Time filter

Source Type

Ingalls Park, IL, United States

Kozloff M.F.,Section of Oncology Hematology | Kozloff M.F.,University of Chicago | Martin L.P.,Chase Medical | Krzakowski M.,Maria Curie Sklodowska University | And 11 more authors.
British Journal of Cancer | Year: 2012

Background: This phase I dose-finding trial evaluated safety, efficacy and pharmacokinetics of axitinib, a potent and selective second-generation inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, combined with platinum doublets in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and other solid tumours. Methods: In all, 49 patients received axitinib 5 mg twice daily (b.i.d.) with paclitaxel/carboplatin or gemcitabine/cisplatin in 3-week cycles. Following determination of the maximum tolerated dose, a squamous cell NSCLC expansion cohort was enroled and received axitinib 5 mg b.i.d. with paclitaxel/carboplatin. Results: Two patients experienced dose-limiting toxicities: febrile neutropenia (n=1) in the paclitaxel/carboplatin cohort and fatigue (n=1) in the gemcitabine/cisplatin cohort. Common nonhaematologic treatment-related adverse events were hypertension (36.7%), diarrhoea (34.7%) and fatigue (28.6%). No grade ≥3 haemoptysis occurred among 12 patients with squamous cell NSCLC. The objective response rate was 37.0% for patients receiving axitinib/paclitaxel/carboplatin (n=27) and 23.8% for patients receiving axitinib/gemcitabine/cisplatin (n=21). Pharmacokinetics of axitinib and chemotherapeutic agents were similar when administered alone or in combination. Conclusion: Axitinib 5 mg b.i.d. may be combined with standard paclitaxel/carboplatin or gemcitabine/cisplatin regimens without evidence of overt drug-drug interactions. Both combinations demonstrated clinical efficacy and were well tolerated. © 2012 Cancer Research UK. Source

Rauh M.J.,Queens University | Rahman F.,Section of Oncology Hematology | Good D.,Sunnybrook Health science Center | Silverman J.,North York General Hospital | And 6 more authors.
Leukemia Research | Year: 2012

The diagnosis of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) can be challenging, owing to the absence of traditional lineage-specific markers, but is facilitated by CD4/CD56 co-expression and frequent skin involvement. Herein, we present our collective experiences with three BPDCN cases lacking cutaneous presentation and the inherent diagnostic pitfalls. Taken in context of similar historical cases, we suggest that BPDCN with "leukemic" presentation (L-BPDCN) otherwise presents no major distinguishing features and is at least as aggressive as its cutaneous-involved BPDCN counterpart. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. Source

Discover hidden collaborations