Section on Hematology & Oncology

Wake Forest, NC, United States

Section on Hematology & Oncology

Wake Forest, NC, United States

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Lucas J.T.,Jr. | Lucas J.T.,Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center | Lesser G.J.,Section on Hematology & Oncology
Journal of Neuro-Oncology | Year: 2015

Gangliogliomas are rare tumors of the central nervous system that are thought to arise from a glioneuronal precursor and consist of both neuronal and glial elements. Grade III, or anaplastic ganglioglioma (AGG), most commonly affects children and young adults, generally arises in a supratentorial location, is highly epileptogenic, and often results in diffuse local and distant failure within the craniospinal axis. Pathologically, these tumors are graded by the degree of malignancy in their glial portion and radiologic diagnosis is difficult due to the wide variation in its degree of solid and cystic components, contrast uptake, and calcification patterns. This report presents three cases of AGG, with initial treatment including subtotal resection followed by conformal radiotherapy. In the case where the AGG developed in the setting of an existent low-grade astrocytoma, the patient received no chemotherapy. Both of the other de novo cases were managed with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy with temozolomide. Recurrence occurred at 6, 16, and 20 months following therapy. Two of the three patients experienced symptomatic decline at recurrence, but experienced Karnofsky performance status (KPS) improvement after salvage therapy, including the reduction of cranial neuropathy and balance. All patients had a significant reduction in presenting symptoms following salvage therapy. Patients died at 23, 20, and 22 months following initial surgical management, respectively. A review of anaplastic and malignant gangliogliomas is presented in the context of these three cases. © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York.


Whitlock M.C.,Section on Cardiovascular Medicine | Yeboah J.,Section on Cardiovascular Medicine | Klepin H.D.,Section on Hematology Oncology | Hundley W.G.,Section on Cardiovascular Medicine
Journal of the American Heart Association | Year: 2015

Background-Although cancer and its corresponding therapies are associated with increased ischemic heart disease, the temporal relationship between cancer and the development of coronary artery calcium (CAC), a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis, is unknown. Methods and Results-Among 3122 men and women free of cardiovascular disease and cancer in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis trial, CAC scoring was performed at baseline (2000-2002) and at follow-up (2010-2012). Over this 10-year period, 85 men (age 63.6±8.3 years) and 50 women (age 62.1±9.8 years) were diagnosed with cancer (predominantly breast, lung, or uterine [52%] in women and prostate or colorectal [78%] in men). The other 2987 subjects (age 59.6±9.2 years for men, 59.7±9.4 years for women) remained cancer free. The incidence of new CAC (baseline Agatston score of zero converting to detectable CAC) was modeled with relative risk regression and compared for cancer versus no cancer. Increase in pre-existing CAC was compared in these groups using linear regression of log transformed CAC. The incidence of CAC was independently associated with cancer history (relative risk 1.32 [P=0.04] and 1.29 [P=0.01] for women and men, respectively). In participants with CAC at baseline, a clear difference of CAC progression was not observed between cancer and noncancer participants (P=0.6 for women, P=0.2 for men). Conclusions-A diagnosis of cancer is associated with the development of CAC even after accounting for atherosclerotic risk factors. However, in individuals with pre-existing CAC, it is not clear whether the presence of cancer accelerates CAC over time. © 2015 The Authors.


PubMed | Section on Cardiovascular Medicine and Section on Hematology Oncology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of the American Heart Association | Year: 2015

Although cancer and its corresponding therapies are associated with increased ischemic heart disease, the temporal relationship between cancer and the development of coronary artery calcium (CAC), a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis, is unknown.Among 3122 men and women free of cardiovascular disease and cancer in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis trial, CAC scoring was performed at baseline (2000-2002) and at follow-up (2010-2012). Over this 10-year period, 85 men (age 63.68.3 years) and 50 women (age 62.19.8 years) were diagnosed with cancer (predominantly breast, lung, or uterine [52%] in women and prostate or colorectal [78%] in men). The other 2987 subjects (age 59.69.2 years for men, 59.79.4 years for women) remained cancer free. The incidence of new CAC (baseline Agatston score of zero converting to detectable CAC) was modeled with relative risk regression and compared for cancer versus no cancer. Increase in pre-existing CAC was compared in these groups using linear regression of log transformed CAC. The incidence of CAC was independently associated with cancer history (relative risk 1.32 [P=0.04] and 1.29 [P=0.01] for women and men, respectively). In participants with CAC at baseline, a clear difference of CAC progression was not observed between cancer and noncancer participants (P=0.6 for women, P=0.2 for men).A diagnosis of cancer is associated with the development of CAC even after accounting for atherosclerotic risk factors. However, in individuals with pre-existing CAC, it is not clear whether the presence of cancer accelerates CAC over time.


PubMed | University of California at San Francisco and Section on Hematology & Oncology
Type: | Journal: Clinical neurology and neurosurgery | Year: 2016

To further evaluate if a delay in the start of radiation therapy (RT) affects patient outcomes for glioblastoma (GBM).From May 1999 to May 2010, a total of 161 patients underwent surgery followed by RT for GBM. We assessed overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS), stratified by extent of surgical resection. Included in the analysis were genomic predictors of progression.Median time from surgery to start of RT was 20days for biopsy alone, 28days for subtotal resection (STR) and 28days for gross total resection (GTR). For all patients, a delay >28days did not result in a difference in PFS when compared to no delay (6.7 vs. 6.9 months, p=0.07). PFS was improved in biopsy or STR patients with a >28day delay to start of RT (4.2 vs. 6.7 months, p=0.006). OS was also improved in patients receiving biopsy or STR with a >28day delay to start of RT (12.3 vs. 7.8 months, p=0.005). Multivariable analysis (MVA) demonstrated an improvement in OS and PFS with time to RT >28days for biopsy or STR patients (HR 0.52 p=0.008 and HR 0.48 p=0.02, respectively).In this retrospective review of GBM patients treated at a single institution, OS and PFS were not different between time to RT >28days compared to <28 days. There was a modest improvement in both PFS and OS in patients who received biopsy or STR with time to RT >28 days.

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