Hematology Clinic

Târgu-Mureş, Romania

Hematology Clinic

Târgu-Mureş, Romania

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Demian S.,Hematology Clinic | Macarie I.,Hematology Clinic | Georgescu D.,University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Targu Mures | Oltean G.,Hematology Clinic | Bataga S.,University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Targu Mures
Journal of Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases | Year: 2012

Acquired haemophilia A is a very rare (1-2 cases per million people) but often life-threatening haemorrhagic disorder characterized by antibodies directed against coagulation factor VIII. We report the case of a 55-year old woman under treatment with Pegylated alpha 2a interferon (IFN) and Ribavirin for chronic viral C hepatitis, who developed a progressive severe haemorrhagic syndrome diagnosed as acquired haemophilia based on supplementary laboratory data (prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time, extremely low factor VIII level - 1%, high titre of factor VIII inhibitor - 30 Bethesda U/ml).The onset was insidious, about three months before presenting to our unit. Antiviral therapy had been stopped three weeks before current admission. Emergency intensive treatment included: haemostatic agents - rFVII (Novoseven), FEIBA (Factor VIII Inhibitor Bypassing Activity), vitamin K, adrenostazin, cryoprecipitate, fresh frozen plasma, as well as immunosuppressive therapy (high dose corticotherapy and cyclophoshamide), immunoglobulins (Humaglobin), prophylactic PPI and antibiotics. The evolution was slowly favourable with the remission of the haemorrhagic syndrome and regression of the iliopsoas muscle haematoma. Clinicians should be aware that acquired forms of haemophilia do exist, representing a rare diagnosis and a therapeutic challenge. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of acquired haemophilia in Romania, in a patient with chronic viral C hepatitis under antiviral treatment.


Zamagni E.,University of Bologna | Nanni C.,University of Bologna | Gay F.,University of Turin | Pezzi A.,University of Bologna | And 25 more authors.
Leukemia | Year: 2016

Identification of patient sub-groups with smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) at high risk of progression to active disease (MM) is an important goal. 18F-FDG PET/CT (positron emission tomography (PET) integrated with computed tomography (PET/CT) using glucose labelled with the positron-emitting radionuclide 18 F) allows for assessing early skeletal involvement. Identification of osteolytic lesions by this technique has recently been incorporated into the updated International Myeloma Working Group criteria for MM diagnosis. However, no data are available regarding the impact of focal lesions (FLs) without underlying osteolysis on time to progression (TTP) to MM. We hence prospectively studied a cohort of 120 SMM patients with PET/CT. PET/CT was positive in 16% of patients (1 FL: 8, 2 FLs: 3, >3 FLs: 6, diffuse bone marrow involvement: 2). With a median follow-up of 2.2 years, 38% of patients progressed to MM, in a median time of 4 years, including 21% with skeletal involvement. The risk of progression of those with positive PET/CT was 3.00 (95% confidence interval 1.58-5.69, P=0.001), with a median TTP of 1.1 versus 4.5 years for PET/CT-negative patients. The probability of progression within 2 years was 58% for positive versus 33% for negative patients. In conclusion, PET/CT positivity significantly increased the risk of progression of SMM to MM. PET/CT could become a new tool to define high-risk SMM. © 2016 Macmillan Publishers Limited.


Messina G.,Centro Unico Regionale Trapianti Alberto Neri | Giaccone L.,University of Turin | Festuccia M.,University of Turin | Irrera G.,Centro Unico Regionale Trapianti Alberto Neri | And 19 more authors.
Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation | Year: 2012

A non myeloablative conditioning with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and antithymocyte globulin (ATG) was shown to protect against graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). To evaluate the effects of TLI-ATG in a multicenter study, 45 heavily pretreated patients, median age 51, with lymphoid (n = 38) and myeloid (n = 7) malignancies were enrolled at 9 centers. Twenty-eight patients (62%) received at least 3 lines of treatment before allografting, and 13 (29%) had refractory/relapsed disease at the time of transplantation. Peripheral blood hematopoietic cells were from HLA identical sibling (n = 30), HLA-matched (n = 9), or 1 antigen HLA-mismatched (n = 6) unrelated donors. A cumulative TLI dose of 8 Gy was administered from day -11 through -1 with ATG at the dose of 1.5 mg/kg/day (from day -11 through -7). GVHD prophylaxis consisted of cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. Donor engraftment was reached in 95% of patients. Grade II to IV acute GVHD (aGVHD) developed in 6 patients (13.3%), and in 2 of these patients, it developed beyond day 100. Incidence of chronic GVHD (cGVHD) was 35.8%. One-year nonrelapse mortality was 9.1%. After a median follow-up of 28 months (range, 3-57 months) from transplantation, median overall survival was not reached, whereas median event-free survival was 20 months. This multicenter experience confirms that TLI-ATG protects against GVHD and maintains graft-vs-tumor effects. © 2012 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.


PubMed | Hematology Unit, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University of Udine, University of Bologna and 6 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Leukemia | Year: 2016

Identification of patient sub-groups with smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) at high risk of progression to active disease (MM) is an important goal. 18F-FDG PET/CT (positron emission tomography (PET) integrated with computed tomography (PET/CT) using glucose labelled with the positron-emitting radionuclide (18)F) allows for assessing early skeletal involvement. Identification of osteolytic lesions by this technique has recently been incorporated into the updated International Myeloma Working Group criteria for MM diagnosis. However, no data are available regarding the impact of focal lesions (FLs) without underlying osteolysis on time to progression (TTP) to MM. We hence prospectively studied a cohort of 120 SMM patients with PET/CT. PET/CT was positive in 16% of patients (1 FL: 8, 2 FLs: 3, >3 FLs: 6, diffuse bone marrow involvement: 2). With a median follow-up of 2.2 years, 38% of patients progressed to MM, in a median time of 4 years, including 21% with skeletal involvement. The risk of progression of those with positive PET/CT was 3.00 (95% confidence interval 1.58-5.69, P=0.001), with a median TTP of 1.1 versus 4.5 years for PET/CT-negative patients. The probability of progression within 2 years was 58% for positive versus 33% for negative patients. In conclusion, PET/CT positivity significantly increased the risk of progression of SMM to MM. PET/CT could become a new tool to define high-risk SMM.


PubMed | New York University, University of Nantes, Tufts Medical Center, Cedars Sinai Medical Center and 25 more.
Type: | Journal: Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology | Year: 2016

Therapeutic advancements following the introduction of autologous stem cell transplantation and novel agents have significantly improved clinical outcomes for patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Increased life expectancy, however, has led to renewed concerns about the long-term risk of second primary malignancies (SPMs). This review outlines the most up-to-date knowledge of possible host-, disease-, and treatment-related risk factors for the development of SPMs in patients with MM, and provides practical recommendations to assist physicians.A Panel of International Myeloma Working Group members reviewed the most relevant data published in the literature as full papers, or presented at meetings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society of Hematology, European Hematology Association, or International Myeloma Workshops, up to June 2016. Here, we present the recommendations of the Panel, based on this literature review.Overall, the risk of SPMs in MM is low, multifactorial, and partially related to the length of patients survival and MM intrinsic susceptibility. Studies suggest a significantly increased incidence of SPMs when lenalidomide is administered either following, or concurrently with, oral melphalan. Increased SPM incidence has also been reported with lenalidomide maintenance following high-dose melphalan, albeit to a lesser degree. In both cases, the risk of death from MM was significantly higher than the risk of death from SPMs, with lenalidomide possibly providing a survival benefit. No increase in SPM incidence was reported with lenalidomide plus dexamethasone (without melphalan), or with bortezomib plus oral melphalan, dexamethasone, or thalidomide.In general, the risk of SPMs should not alter the current therapeutic decision-making process in MM. However, regimens such as lenalidomide plus dexamethasone should be preferred to prolonged exposure to lenalidomide plus oral melphalan. SPM risk should be carefully discussed with the patient in the context of benefits and risks of different treatment options.


Gadomska G.,Hematology Clinic | Rosc D.,Nicolaus Copernicus University | Stankowska K.,Nicolaus Copernicus University | Boinska J.,Nicolaus Copernicus University | And 2 more authors.
Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis | Year: 2014

Hemostatic disorders are a major clinical problem in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) and they are the second most common cause of death in MPN patients, after infections. The aim of this study was to assess the fibrinolytic potential of the blood of patients with MPNs. The study involved 112 patients with MPNs diagnosed at the Hematology Clinic Dr J. Biziel University Hospital No. 2 in Bydgoszcz, Poland. The study group included 63 patients with essential thrombocythemia, 29 with polycythemia vera, 11 with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and nine with primary myelofibrosis. The control group consisted of 25 healthy volunteers who were age and sex-matched. The following parameters were determined: concentration of tissue plasminogen activator antigen (t-PA:Ag), plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 antigen concentration (PAI-1:Ag), D-dimer, thrombin-antithrombin complexes, fibrinogen, activated partial thromboplastin time and international normalized ratio. The study showed significantly increased t-PA:Ag, PAI-1:Ag and D-dimer levels in patients with MPNs. Moreover, we found increased concentrations of thrombin-antithrombin complexes and fibrinogen, as well as elevated platelet counts. Detailed analysis revealed that t-PA:Ag concentration was elevated in patients with essential thrombocythemia, CML and polycythemia vera. Concentration of PAI-1:Ag was increased in patients with essential thrombocythemia and polycythemia vera; D-dimer was significantly higher in essential thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera, CML and primary myelofibrosis patients. Increased concentrations of t-PA:Ag and D-dimer indicate secondary activation of the fibrinolytic system in patients with MPNs. Elevated levels of PAI-1 in MPN patients may result from its increased production by elevated number of activated platelets and vascular endothelial damage. PAI-1 by having an inhibitory effect on fibrinolysis manifests its procoagulant activity. Copyright © 2014 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

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