Cincinnati, OH, United States
Cincinnati, OH, United States

Time filter

Source Type

Visscher M.O.,Cincinnati Childrens Hospital Medical Center | Burkes S.A.,Cincinnati Childrens Hospital Medical Center | Burkes S.A.,University of Cincinnati | Adams D.M.,Cincinnati Childrens Hospital Medical Center | And 4 more authors.
Skin Research and Technology | Year: 2016

Background: Infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are benign vascular neoplasms with rapid capillary proliferation shortly after birth and slow involution with diminishing capillary proliferative activity, fibrosis, and fatty replacement over 7–10 years. Methods: Hemangiomas and contralateral control sites in 88 subjects were measured using a suction device, 6-mm probe and 200 mbar negative pressure. Mechanical properties were assessed vs. controls and effects of body site, depth, clinical stage, histology diagnosis, and time. Results: Biological elasticity, overall elasticity, net elasticity, total recovery, and elastic recovery were lower for IH vs. controls (P < 0.001). IH total deformation, elastic deformation, viscoelastic creep, and residual deformation were higher than controls (P < 0.001). Involuting IHs had lower viscoelasticity than proliferating and stable lesions (P < 0.001) and lower viscoelastic creep than stable IHs (P = 0.04). IH viscoelasticity was higher at 2.3 than 12.9, 23.7, and 61.0 months and at 4.9 and 8.1 than 61.0 months. IH elastic recovery varied by body site with larger differences vs. control for abdomen and leg. Elastic recovery differences from control were smaller at younger vs. older ages. Conclusions: Measurement of biomechanical properties may be useful to characterize IH progression and treatment response in clinical settings. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd


Burkes S.A.,University of Cincinnati | Burkes S.A.,Cincinnati Childrens Hospital Medical Center | Patel M.,Hemangioma and Vascular Malformation Center | Patel M.,Cincinnati Childrens Hospital Medical Center | And 9 more authors.
International Journal of Dermatology | Year: 2016

Background: Infantile hemangiomas (IH) are initially warm due to increased proliferation and perfusion then involute with apoptosis and reduced perfusion. Objective quantitative evaluation of IH treatment response is essential for improving outcomes. We applied a functional imaging method, dynamic infrared (IR) thermography, to investigate IH status versus control skin and over time. Materials and methods: A preliminary prospective observational study was conducted among 25 subjects with superficial or mixed IHs (< 19 months) over 59 clinic visits. Infrared images of IHs and control sites, standardized color images, and three-dimensional images were obtained. Tissue responses following application and removal of a cold stress were recorded with video IR thermography. Outcomes included areas under the curve during cooling (AUCcool) and rewarming (AUCrw) and thermal intensity distribution maps. Results: AUCcool and AUCrw were significantly higher and cooling rate slower for IHs versus uninvolved tissue indicating greater heat, presumably due to greater perfusion and metabolism for the IH. IR distribution maps showed specific areas of high and low temperature. Significant changes in IH thermal activity were reflected in the difference (AUCcool – AUCrw), with 6.2 at 2.2 months increasing to 37.6 at 12.8 months. IH cooling rate increased with age, indicating slower recovery, and interpreted as reduced proliferation and/or involution. Conclusions: Dynamic IR thermography was a well-tolerated, quantitative functional imaging modality appropriate for the clinic, particularly when structural changes, i.e., height, volume, color, were not readily observed. It may assist in monitoring progress, individualizing treatment, and evaluating therapies. Clinical Trial Registration: www.clinicaltrials.gov (Identifier NCT02061735). © 2016 The International Society of Dermatology


PubMed | Hemangioma and Vascular Malformation Center, University of Cincinnati and Imaging Research Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of dermatology | Year: 2016

Infantile hemangiomas (IH) are initially warm due to increased proliferation and perfusion then involute with apoptosis and reduced perfusion. Objective quantitative evaluation of IH treatment response is essential for improving outcomes. We applied a functional imaging method, dynamic infrared (IR) thermography, to investigate IH status versus control skin and over time.A preliminary prospective observational study was conducted among 25 subjects with superficial or mixed IHs (< 19 months) over 59 clinic visits. Infrared images of IHs and control sites, standardized color images, and three-dimensional images were obtained. Tissue responses following application and removal of a cold stress were recorded with video IR thermography. Outcomes included areas under the curve during cooling (AUCcool ) and rewarming (AUCrw ) and thermal intensity distribution maps.AUCcool and AUCrw were significantly higher and cooling rate slower for IHs versus uninvolved tissue indicating greater heat, presumably due to greater perfusion and metabolism for the IH. IR distribution maps showed specific areas of high and low temperature. Significant changes in IH thermal activity were reflected in the difference (AUCcool - AUCrw ), with 6.2 at 2.2 months increasing to 37.6 at 12.8 months. IH cooling rate increased with age, indicating slower recovery, and interpreted as reduced proliferation and/or involution.Dynamic IR thermography was a well-tolerated, quantitative functional imaging modality appropriate for the clinic, particularly when structural changes, i.e., height, volume, color, were not readily observed. It may assist in monitoring progress, individualizing treatment, and evaluating therapies.www.clinicaltrials.gov (Identifier NCT02061735).

Loading Hemangioma and Vascular Malformation Center collaborators
Loading Hemangioma and Vascular Malformation Center collaborators