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News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Vaisala Press Release May 16, 2017 at 8.00 a.m. Vaisala Measures Air Quality in the First City-Wide System in the World Vaisala instruments will measure the air quality in the Helsinki region in a new measurement network to be built by the Smart & Clean project parties -Vaisala, Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki Region Environmental Services Authority HSY, University of Helsinki, Pegasor, and Helsinki Metropolitan Smart & Clean Foundation - during 2017 and 2018. The network will be the first air quality monitoring system of such accuracy in the world to cover the whole city. The new monitoring network will help compile much more comprehensive information about the air quality in different parts of the Helsinki metropolitan region. The Smart & Clean project aims at improving air quality in the Helsinki region as well as creating new, innovative applications, and piloting solutions suitable for export. Reference measurement stations utilizing traditional methods are very expensive, so their number and regional coverage is highly limited. The measurement instruments launched by Vaisala in the fall of 2016 are based on new technology and can be used to significantly improve local coverage of the measurements at a very reasonable cost. "Actions taken to improve air quality can only be successful when based on measured data which again gives rise to insights. Air quality varies significantly even in very small areas due to e.g. weather, emissions, and traffic flows, so we need local information to improve people's quality of life and to achieve a deep understanding of metropolitan air quality," says Jarkko Sairanen, Vaisala EVP for the Weather Business Area. Air quality is a growing health problem around the world. More than 80% of people living in urban areas are exposed to air pollution levels that exceed WHO limits. According to WHO estimates, approximately 7 million people died prematurely because of air pollution in 2012. While all regions of the world are affected, populations in low-income and densely populated cities are the most impacted. Major cities in Europe, such as Paris or London, also suffer from this problem. In Finland, air quality is generally good, but even here 40% of city dwellers get symptoms from street dust, and air pollution is estimated to cause about 1,600 premature deaths per year. The increase in health problems and premature deaths have a direct impact on the economy through higher medical expenses and loss of productivity. The new air quality monitoring system uses Vaisala's innovative AQT400 series transmitters. They are a low-cost solution to measuring reliably the most important air pollutants: particles, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, ozone and carbon monoxide. The instruments are easy to install and deploy as well as to maintain. They can also be connected to Vaisala's weather measurement equipment as well as different air quality modeling systems. The combination can significantly improve the reliability of real-time air quality measurements in diverse terrain and city environments. The project uses the latest technology and cutting-edge air quality knowhow from Finland. Vaisala Vaisala is a global leader in environmental and industrial measurement. Building on 80 years of experience, Vaisala contributes to a better quality of life by providing a comprehensive range of innovative observation and measurement products and services for chosen weather-related and industrial markets. Headquartered in Finland, Vaisala employs approximately 1,600 professionals worldwide and is listed on the NASDAQ OMX Helsinki stock exchange. www.vaisala.fi


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Vaisala Press Release May 16, 2017 at 8.00 a.m. Vaisala Measures Air Quality in the First City-Wide System in the World Vaisala instruments will measure the air quality in the Helsinki region in a new measurement network to be built by the Smart & Clean project parties -Vaisala, Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki Region Environmental Services Authority HSY, University of Helsinki, Pegasor, and Helsinki Metropolitan Smart & Clean Foundation - during 2017 and 2018. The network will be the first air quality monitoring system of such accuracy in the world to cover the whole city. The new monitoring network will help compile much more comprehensive information about the air quality in different parts of the Helsinki metropolitan region. The Smart & Clean project aims at improving air quality in the Helsinki region as well as creating new, innovative applications, and piloting solutions suitable for export. Reference measurement stations utilizing traditional methods are very expensive, so their number and regional coverage is highly limited. The measurement instruments launched by Vaisala in the fall of 2016 are based on new technology and can be used to significantly improve local coverage of the measurements at a very reasonable cost. "Actions taken to improve air quality can only be successful when based on measured data which again gives rise to insights. Air quality varies significantly even in very small areas due to e.g. weather, emissions, and traffic flows, so we need local information to improve people's quality of life and to achieve a deep understanding of metropolitan air quality," says Jarkko Sairanen, Vaisala EVP for the Weather Business Area. Air quality is a growing health problem around the world. More than 80% of people living in urban areas are exposed to air pollution levels that exceed WHO limits. According to WHO estimates, approximately 7 million people died prematurely because of air pollution in 2012. While all regions of the world are affected, populations in low-income and densely populated cities are the most impacted. Major cities in Europe, such as Paris or London, also suffer from this problem. In Finland, air quality is generally good, but even here 40% of city dwellers get symptoms from street dust, and air pollution is estimated to cause about 1,600 premature deaths per year. The increase in health problems and premature deaths have a direct impact on the economy through higher medical expenses and loss of productivity. The new air quality monitoring system uses Vaisala's innovative AQT400 series transmitters. They are a low-cost solution to measuring reliably the most important air pollutants: particles, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, ozone and carbon monoxide. The instruments are easy to install and deploy as well as to maintain. They can also be connected to Vaisala's weather measurement equipment as well as different air quality modeling systems. The combination can significantly improve the reliability of real-time air quality measurements in diverse terrain and city environments. The project uses the latest technology and cutting-edge air quality knowhow from Finland. Vaisala Vaisala is a global leader in environmental and industrial measurement. Building on 80 years of experience, Vaisala contributes to a better quality of life by providing a comprehensive range of innovative observation and measurement products and services for chosen weather-related and industrial markets. Headquartered in Finland, Vaisala employs approximately 1,600 professionals worldwide and is listed on the NASDAQ OMX Helsinki stock exchange. www.vaisala.fi


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Vaisala Press Release May 16, 2017 at 8.00 a.m. Vaisala Measures Air Quality in the First City-Wide System in the World Vaisala instruments will measure the air quality in the Helsinki region in a new measurement network to be built by the Smart & Clean project parties -Vaisala, Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki Region Environmental Services Authority HSY, University of Helsinki, Pegasor, and Helsinki Metropolitan Smart & Clean Foundation - during 2017 and 2018. The network will be the first air quality monitoring system of such accuracy in the world to cover the whole city. The new monitoring network will help compile much more comprehensive information about the air quality in different parts of the Helsinki metropolitan region. The Smart & Clean project aims at improving air quality in the Helsinki region as well as creating new, innovative applications, and piloting solutions suitable for export. Reference measurement stations utilizing traditional methods are very expensive, so their number and regional coverage is highly limited. The measurement instruments launched by Vaisala in the fall of 2016 are based on new technology and can be used to significantly improve local coverage of the measurements at a very reasonable cost. "Actions taken to improve air quality can only be successful when based on measured data which again gives rise to insights. Air quality varies significantly even in very small areas due to e.g. weather, emissions, and traffic flows, so we need local information to improve people's quality of life and to achieve a deep understanding of metropolitan air quality," says Jarkko Sairanen, Vaisala EVP for the Weather Business Area. Air quality is a growing health problem around the world. More than 80% of people living in urban areas are exposed to air pollution levels that exceed WHO limits. According to WHO estimates, approximately 7 million people died prematurely because of air pollution in 2012. While all regions of the world are affected, populations in low-income and densely populated cities are the most impacted. Major cities in Europe, such as Paris or London, also suffer from this problem. In Finland, air quality is generally good, but even here 40% of city dwellers get symptoms from street dust, and air pollution is estimated to cause about 1,600 premature deaths per year. The increase in health problems and premature deaths have a direct impact on the economy through higher medical expenses and loss of productivity. The new air quality monitoring system uses Vaisala's innovative AQT400 series transmitters. They are a low-cost solution to measuring reliably the most important air pollutants: particles, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, ozone and carbon monoxide. The instruments are easy to install and deploy as well as to maintain. They can also be connected to Vaisala's weather measurement equipment as well as different air quality modeling systems. The combination can significantly improve the reliability of real-time air quality measurements in diverse terrain and city environments. The project uses the latest technology and cutting-edge air quality knowhow from Finland. Vaisala Vaisala is a global leader in environmental and industrial measurement. Building on 80 years of experience, Vaisala contributes to a better quality of life by providing a comprehensive range of innovative observation and measurement products and services for chosen weather-related and industrial markets. Headquartered in Finland, Vaisala employs approximately 1,600 professionals worldwide and is listed on the NASDAQ OMX Helsinki stock exchange. www.vaisala.fi


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Vaisala Press Release May 16, 2017 at 8.00 a.m. Vaisala Measures Air Quality in the First City-Wide System in the World Vaisala instruments will measure the air quality in the Helsinki region in a new measurement network to be built by the Smart & Clean project parties -Vaisala, Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki Region Environmental Services Authority HSY, University of Helsinki, Pegasor, and Helsinki Metropolitan Smart & Clean Foundation - during 2017 and 2018. The network will be the first air quality monitoring system of such accuracy in the world to cover the whole city. The new monitoring network will help compile much more comprehensive information about the air quality in different parts of the Helsinki metropolitan region. The Smart & Clean project aims at improving air quality in the Helsinki region as well as creating new, innovative applications, and piloting solutions suitable for export. Reference measurement stations utilizing traditional methods are very expensive, so their number and regional coverage is highly limited. The measurement instruments launched by Vaisala in the fall of 2016 are based on new technology and can be used to significantly improve local coverage of the measurements at a very reasonable cost. "Actions taken to improve air quality can only be successful when based on measured data which again gives rise to insights. Air quality varies significantly even in very small areas due to e.g. weather, emissions, and traffic flows, so we need local information to improve people's quality of life and to achieve a deep understanding of metropolitan air quality," says Jarkko Sairanen, Vaisala EVP for the Weather Business Area. Air quality is a growing health problem around the world. More than 80% of people living in urban areas are exposed to air pollution levels that exceed WHO limits. According to WHO estimates, approximately 7 million people died prematurely because of air pollution in 2012. While all regions of the world are affected, populations in low-income and densely populated cities are the most impacted. Major cities in Europe, such as Paris or London, also suffer from this problem. In Finland, air quality is generally good, but even here 40% of city dwellers get symptoms from street dust, and air pollution is estimated to cause about 1,600 premature deaths per year. The increase in health problems and premature deaths have a direct impact on the economy through higher medical expenses and loss of productivity. The new air quality monitoring system uses Vaisala's innovative AQT400 series transmitters. They are a low-cost solution to measuring reliably the most important air pollutants: particles, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, ozone and carbon monoxide. The instruments are easy to install and deploy as well as to maintain. They can also be connected to Vaisala's weather measurement equipment as well as different air quality modeling systems. The combination can significantly improve the reliability of real-time air quality measurements in diverse terrain and city environments. The project uses the latest technology and cutting-edge air quality knowhow from Finland. Vaisala Vaisala is a global leader in environmental and industrial measurement. Building on 80 years of experience, Vaisala contributes to a better quality of life by providing a comprehensive range of innovative observation and measurement products and services for chosen weather-related and industrial markets. Headquartered in Finland, Vaisala employs approximately 1,600 professionals worldwide and is listed on the NASDAQ OMX Helsinki stock exchange. www.vaisala.fi


Kauhaniemi M.,Finnish Meteorological Institute | Kukkonen J.,Finnish Meteorological Institute | Harkonen J.,Finnish Meteorological Institute | Nikmo J.,Finnish Meteorological Institute | And 6 more authors.
Atmospheric Environment | Year: 2011

We have slightly refined, evaluated and tested a mathematical model for predicting the vehicular suspension emissions of PM10. The model describes particulate matter generated by the wear of road pavement, traction sand, and the processes that control the suspension of road dust particles into the air. However, the model does not address the emissions from the wear of vehicle components. The performance of this suspension emission model has been evaluated in combination with the street canyon dispersion model OSPM. We used data from a measurement campaign that was conducted in the street canyon Runeberg Street in Helsinki from 8 January to 2 May, 2004. The model reproduced fairly well the seasonal variation of the PM10 concentrations, also during the time periods, when studded tyres and anti-skid treatments were commonly in use. For instance, the index of agreement (IA) was 0.83 for the time series of the hourly predicted and observed concentrations of PM10. The predictions of the model were found to be sensitive to precipitation and street traction sanding. The main uncertainties in the predictions are probably caused by (i) the cleaning processes of the streets, which are currently not included in the model, (ii) the uncertainties in the estimation of the sanding days, and (iii) the uncertainties in the evaluation of precipitation. This study provides more confidence that this model could potentially be a valuable tool of assessment to evaluate and forecast the suspension PM10 emissions worldwide. However, a further evaluation of the model is needed against other datasets in various vehicle fleet, speed and climatic conditions. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Pirjola L.,Helsinki Metropolia University of Applied Sciences | Pirjola L.,University of Helsinki | Lahde T.,Helsinki Metropolia University of Applied Sciences | Niemi J.V.,Helsinki Region Environmental Services Authority HSY | And 7 more authors.
Atmospheric Environment | Year: 2012

A measurement campaign by a mobile laboratory van was performed in urban microenvironments bounded by a busy street Mannerheimintie in the city center of Helsinki, Finland. The characteristics of spatiotemporally high-resolution pollutant concentrations were studied such as ultrafine particles in the size range of 3-414 nm, black carbon BC, fine particle mass PM 2.5, as well as nitrogen oxides NO and NO 2. In addition, the effects of street geometry and roadside structure on the local dispersion of traffic emissions were analyzed as well. Meteorological conditions stayed stable and the wind direction was perpendicular to Mannerheimintie during the campaign. The highest particle concentrations were ∼8 × 10 5 cm -3, of which around 94% was smaller than 40 nm. At the pavement, the average concentration was in maximum 5 × 10 4 cm -3; around 80% of the particles was smaller than 40 nm. The volatility fraction was 75% by number. Due to the street canyon effect by the surrounding buildings, the downwind concentrations were around 24% of the upwind concentrations for particle number, 28% of NO, 39% of BC and 70% of NO 2 concentrations. Furthermore, the upwind concentrations were higher than the simultaneously measured concentrations within the traffic flow. In fact, the particle count was around 3-fold, BC 2.5-fold, PM 2.5 and NO 2 1.5-fold compared to the concentrations while driving. Thus, for this measurement site and under these meteorological conditions, the exposure to pedestrians and cyclist on the upwind pavement is even higher than the driver's exposure. If the downwind buildings were parallel to Mannerheimintie, the concentrations dropped significantly at the pavement and continued decreasing slightly in the courtyards. When the downwind buildings were perpendicular to Mannerheimintie, a gradual reduction in the concentrations between the buildings was observed. However, at a distance of approximately a hundred meters a parallel side street which was a street canyon, started to affect the concentrations resulting in an increased exposure risk for pedestrians and cyclists. Understanding the local transport and the dispersion of traffic emissions are important for city planning and air quality assessment. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Pirjola L.,Helsinki Metropolia University of Applied Sciences | Pirjola L.,University of Helsinki | Pajunoja A.,Tampere University of Technology | Pajunoja A.,University of Eastern Finland | And 5 more authors.
Atmospheric Measurement Techniques | Year: 2014

Four measurement campaigns were performed in two different environments - inside the harbour areas in the city centre of Helsinki, and along the narrow shipping channel near the city of Turku, Finland - using a mobile laboratory van during winter and summer conditions in 2010-2011. The characteristics of gaseous (CO, CO2, SO2, NO, NO2, NOx) and particulate (number and volume size distributions as well as PM2.5) emissions for 11 ships regularly operating on the Baltic Sea were studied to determine the emission parameters. The highest particle concentrations were 1.5 × 106 and 1.6 × 105 cm-3 in Helsinki and Turku, respectively, and the particle number size distributions had two modes. The dominating mode peaked at 20-30 nm, and the accumulation mode at 80-100 nm. The majority of the particle mass was volatile, since after heating the sample to 265 C, the particle volume of the studied ship decreased by around 70%. The emission factors for NOx varied in the range of 25-100 g (kg fuel)-1, for SO2 in the range of 2.5-17.0 g (kg fuel)-1, for particle number in the range of (0.32-2.26) × 1016 # (kg fuel)-1, and for PM2.5 between 1.0-4.9 g (kg fuel)-1. The ships equipped with SCR (selective catalytic reduction) had the lowest NOx emissions, whereas the ships with DWI (direct water injection) and HAMs (humid air motors) had the lowest SO2 emissions but the highest particulate emissions. For all ships, the averaged fuel sulphur contents (FSCs) were less than 1% (by mass) but none of them was below 0.1% which will be the new EU directive starting 1 January 2015 in the SOx emission control areas; this indicates that ships operating on the Baltic Sea will face large challenges. © Author(s) 2014.


Dos Santos-Juusela V.,University of Helsinki | Petaja T.,University of Helsinki | Kousa A.,Helsinki Region Environmental Services Authority HSY | Hameri K.,University of Helsinki | Hameri K.,Finnish Institute of Occupational Health
Atmospheric Environment | Year: 2013

To estimate spatial-temporal variations of ultrafine particles (UFP) in Helsinki, we measured particle total number concentrations (PNC) continuously in a busy street and an urban background site for six months, using condensation particle counters (CPC). We also evaluated the effects of temperature, wind speed and wind direction on PNC, as well as the correlation between PNC and PM2.5, PM10 and black carbon (BC) at the street. We found that on weekdays, hourly median PNC were highly correlated with BC (r=0.88), moderately correlated with PM2.5 (r=0.59) and weakly correlated with PM10 (r=0.22). Number concentrations at the street were inversely proportional to temperature and wind speed, and highly dependent on wind direction. The highest PNC occurred during northeastern winds while the lowest occurred during southwestern winds. As these wind directions are nearly perpendicular to the street axis, the formation of wind vortices may have influenced the dispersion of UFP in the site. Although the temporal correlation for PNC was moderately high between the sites (r=0.71), the median concentration at the street was 3 times higher than the urban background levels. The results indicate that people living or passing by the busy street are exposed to UFP concentrations well above the urban background levels. Thus, the study suggests that urban microenvironments should be considered in epidemiological studies. In addition the results emphasize that regulations based solely on PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations may be insufficient for preventing the adverse health effects of airborne particles. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Helsinki Region Environmental Services Authority HSY, Salon Vesi, Tampere University of Technology, University of Helsinki and University of Jyväskylä
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of industrial microbiology & biotechnology | Year: 2016

Molecular monitoring of bacterial communities can explain and predict the stability of bioprocesses in varying physicochemical conditions. To study methanol-fed denitrification biofilters of municipal wastewater treatment plants, bacterial communities of two full-scale biofilters were compared through fingerprinting and sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes. Additionally, 16S rRNA gene fingerprinting was used for 10-week temporal monitoring of the bacterial community in one of the biofilters. Combining the data with previous study results, the family Methylophilaceae and genus Hyphomicrobium were determined as suitable target groups for monitoring. An increase in the relative abundance of Hyphomicrobium-related biomarkers occurred simultaneously with increases in water flow, NO


PubMed | Helsinki Region Environmental Services Authority HSY, University of Eastern Finland, Finnish Environment Institute and Aalto University
Type: | Journal: Water research | Year: 2016

Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) can offer a solution to reduce the point source input of microlitter and microplastics into the environment. To evaluate the contributing processes for microlitter removal, the removal of microlitter from wastewater during different treatment steps of mechanical, chemical and biological treatment (activated sludge) and biologically active filter (BAF) in a large (population equivalent 800000) advanced WWTP was examined. Most of the microlitter was removed already during the pre-treatment and activated sludge treatment further decreased the microlitter concentration. The overall retention capacity of studied WWTP was over 99% and was achieved after secondary treatment. However, despite of the high removal performance, even an advanced WWTP may constitute a considerable source of microlitter and microplastics into the aquatic environment given the large volumes of effluent discharged constantly. The microlitter content of excess sludge, dried sludge and reject water were also examined. According to the balance analyses, approximately 20% of the microlitter removed from the process is recycled back with the reject water, whereas 80% of the microlitter is contained in the dried sludge. The study also looked at easy microlitter sampling protocol with automated composite samplers for possible future monitoring purposes.

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Loading Helsinki Region Environmental Services Authority HSY collaborators