Potsdam, Germany
Potsdam, Germany

Time filter

Source Type

Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.90M | Year: 2016

The Arctic plays a key role in the Earths climate system and is an area of growing strategic importance for European policy. In this ETN, we will train the next generation of Arctic microbiology and biogeochemistry experts who, through their unique understanding of the Arctic environment and the factors that impact ecosystem and organism response to the warming Arctic, will be able to respond to the need for leadership from public, policy and commercial interests. The training and research programme of MicroArctic is made up of seven interlinked Work Packages (WP). WP1 to WP4 are research work packages at the cutting edge of Arctic microbiology and biogeochemistry and these will be supported by three overarching WPs (WP5-7) associated with the management, training and dissemination of results. WP1 will deliver information about the role of external inputs (e.g., atmospheric) of nutrients and microorganism that drive biogeochemical processes in relation to annual variation in Arctic microbial activity and biogeochemical processes. WP2 will explore ecosystem response on time scales of 100s of years to these inputs using a chrnosequence approach in the already changing Arctic. The effect of time and season and the warming of the Arctic on ecosystem functioning and natural resources will be quantified through geochemical analyses and next generation multi-omics approaches. Complementing WP1 and WP2, WP3 will focus on organism response and adaptation using a range of biochemical, molecular, experimental and culturing approaches. WP4 will address specific applied issues such as colonisation by pathogenic organisms and biotechnological exploitation of Arctic ecosystems. MicroArctic will bring together interdisciplinary experts from both the academic and non-academic sectors across Europe into a network of 20 Institutions across 11 countries.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: ERA-NET-Cofund | Phase: SC5-15-2015 | Award Amount: 52.36M | Year: 2016

In the last decade a significant number of projects and programmes in different domains of environmental monitoring and Earth observation have generated a substantial amount of data and knowledge on different aspects related to environmental quality and sustainability. Big data generated by in-situ or satellite platforms are being collected and archived with a plethora of systems and instruments making difficult the sharing of data and knowledge to stakeholders and policy makers for supporting key economic and societal sectors. The overarching goal of ERA-PLANET is to strengthen the European Research Area in the domain of Earth Observation in coherence with the European participation to Group on Earth Observation (GEO) and the Copernicus. The expected impact is to strengthen the European leadership within the forthcoming GEO 2015-2025 Work Plan. ERA-PLANET will reinforce the interface with user communities, whose needs the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) intends to address. It will provide more accurate, comprehensive and authoritative information to policy and decision-makers in key societal benefit areas, such as Smart cities and Resilient societies; Resource efficiency and Environmental management; Global changes and Environmental treaties; Polar areas and Natural resources. ERA-PLANET will provide advanced decision support tools and technologies aimed to better monitor our global environment and share the information and knowledge in different domain of Earth Observation.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: BG-09-2016 | Award Amount: 15.49M | Year: 2016

The overall objective of INTAROS is to develop an integrated Arctic Observation System (iAOS) by extending, improving and unifying existing systems in the different regions of the Arctic. INTAROS will have a strong multidisciplinary focus, with tools for integration of data from atmosphere, ocean, cryosphere and terrestrial sciences, provided by institutions in Europe, North America and Asia. Satellite earth observation data plays an increasingly important role in such observing systems, because the amount of EO data for observing the global climate and environment grows year by year. In situ observing systems are much more limited due to logistical constraints and cost limitations. The sparseness of in situ data is therefore the largest gap in the overall observing system. INTAROS will assess strengths and weaknesses of existing observing systems and contribute with innovative solutions to fill some of the critical gaps in the in situ observing network. INTAROS will develop a platform, iAOS, to search for and access data from distributed databases. The evolution into a sustainable Arctic observing system requires coordination, mobilization and cooperation between the existing European and international infrastructures (in-situ and remote including space-based), the modeling communities and relevant stakeholder groups. INTAROS will include development of community-based observing systems, where local knowledge is merged with scientific data. An integrated Arctic Observation System will enable better-informed decisions and better-documented processes within key sectors (e.g. local communities, shipping, tourism, fisheries), in order to strengthen the societal and economic role of the Arctic region and support the EU strategy for the Arctic and related maritime and environmental policies.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.91M | Year: 2016

The SUBITOP ETN is a framework for training and career development of young researchers in Geodynamics, Geophysics, Geology and Geomorphology. It has a scientific focus on the dynamics of continental margins where tectonic plates are recycled through subduction. Subduction processes have shaped and govern many aspects of the topography of Europe, and other continents, and they determine the patterns and intensity of geological hazards such as earthquakes, volcanic activity and landsliding. The Training Network will imbue 15 young scientists with the ability to address the links between the geological processes within subduction zones and the processes that impact the Earths surface above, using a comprehensive range of modelling and observation techniques and exploiting the full diversity of active and ancient subduction systems within Europe. SUBITOP fuses research and training at ten leading centres of the Earth Sciences in Europe and forges partnerships with 15 companies for its fellows, with participants in eight countries. It will train Early Stage Researchers (ESR) through a structured programme of cross-disciplinary, collaborative research, and integrated skills and outreach activities. This experience-based training is centred on PhD projects, covering a spectrum of topics from the deep mechanics of subduction zones to the erosion of their uplifted topography. Together the projects probe the functioning of the subduction system in its entirety, and they are welded together by shared techniques, study sites and data sets. Through their projects, the ESRs will acquire skills in modelling and observation of coupled processes in complex geological systems. SUBITOP will also impart essential communication, outreach and career management skills, and first-hand experience of the private sector through project-specific secondments and co-supervision by industry partners, and embed its ESRs in the active TOPO-Europe research community.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: LCE-03-2015 | Award Amount: 25.07M | Year: 2016

DESTRESS is aimed at creating EGS (Enhanced geothermal systems) reservoirs with sufficient permeability, fracture orientation and spacing for economic use of underground heat. The concepts are based on experience in previous projects, on scientific progress and developments in other fields, mainly the oil & gas sector. Recently developed stimulation methods will be adapted to geothermal needs, applied to new geothermal sites and prepared for the market uptake. Understanding of risks in each area (whether technological, in business processes, for particular business cases, or otherwise), risk ownership, and possible risk mitigation will be the scope of specific work packages. The DESTRESS concept takes into account the common and specific issues of different sites, representative for large parts of Europe, and will provide a generally applicable workflow for productivity enhancement measures. The main focus will be on stimulation treatments with minimized environmental hazard (soft stimulation), to enhance the reservoir in several geological settings covering granites, sandstones, and other rock types. The business cases will be shown with cost and benefit estimations based on the proven changes of the system performance, and the environmental footprint of treatments and operation of the site will be controlled. In particular, the public debate related to fracking will be addressed by applying specific concepts for the mitigation of damaging seismic effects while constructing a productive reservoir and operating a long-term sustainable system. Industrial participation is particularly pronounced in DESTRESS, including large energy suppliers as well as SMEs in the process of developing their sites. The composition of the consortium involving major knowledge institutes as well as key industry will guarantee the increase in technology performance of EGS as well as an accelerated time to market.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: LCE-02-2015 | Award Amount: 6.14M | Year: 2016

Within the project SURE (Novel Productivity Enhancement Concept for a Sustainable Utilization of a Geothermal Resource) the radial water jet drilling (RJD) technology will be investigated and tested as a method to increase inflow into insufficiently producing geothermal wells. Radial water jet drilling uses the power of a focused jet of fluids, applied to a rock through a coil inserted in an existing well. This technology is likely to provide much better control of the enhanced flow paths around a geothermal well and does not involve the amount of fluid as conventional hydraulic fracturing, reducing the risk of induced seismicity considerably. RJD shall be applied to access and connect high permeable zones within geothermal reservoirs to the main well with a higher degree of control compared to conventional stimulation technologies. A characterization of the parameters controlling the jet-ability of different rock formations, however, has not been performed for the equipment applied so far. SURE will investigate the technology for deep geothermal reservoir rocks at different geological settings such as deep sedimentary basins or magmatic regions at the micro-, meso- and macro-scale. Laboratory tests will include the determination of parameters such as elastic constants, permeability and cohesion of the rocks as well as jetting experiments into large samples in. Samples will be investigated in 3D with micro CT scanners and with standard microscopy approaches. In addition, advanced modelling will help understand the actual mechanism leading to the rock destruction at the tip of the water jet. Last but not least, experimental and modelling results will be validated by controlled experiments in a quarry (mesoscale) which allows precise monitoring of the process, and in two different geothermal wells. The consortium includes the only company in Europe offering the radial drilling service.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: LCE-23-2016 | Award Amount: 10.00M | Year: 2016

The GEMex project is a complementary effort of a European consortium with a corresponding consortium from Mexico, who submitted an equivalent proposal for cooperation. The joint effort is based on three pillars: 1 Resource assessment at two unconventional geothermal sites, for EGS development at Acoculco and for a super-hot resource near Los Humeros. This part will focus on understanding the tectonic evolution, the fracture distribution and hydrogeology of the respective region, and on predicting in-situ stresses and temperatures at depth. 2 Reservoir characterization using techniques and approaches developed at conventional geothermal sites, including novel geophysical and geological methods to be tested and refined for their application at the two project sites: passive seismic data will be used to apply ambient noise correlation methods, and to study anisotropy by coupling surface and volume waves; newly collected electromagnetic data will be used for joint inversion with the seismic data. For the interpretation of these data, high-pressure/ high-temperature laboratory experiments will be performed to derive the parameters determined on rock samples from Mexico or equivalent materials. 3 Concepts for Site Development: all existing and newly collected information will be applied to define drill paths, to recommend a design for well completion including suitable material selection, and to investigate optimum stimulation and operation procedures for safe and economic exploitation with control of undesired side effects. These steps will include appropriate measures and recommendations for public acceptance and outreach as well as for the monitoring and control of environmental impact. The consortium was formed from the EERA joint programme of geothermal energy in regular and long-time communication with the partners from Mexico. That way a close interaction of the two consortia is guaranteed and will continue beyond the duration of the project.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: LCE-02-2015 | Award Amount: 4.70M | Year: 2016

New concepts for high-temperature geothermal well technologies are strongly needed to accelerate the development of geothermal resources for power generation in Europe and worldwide in a cost effective and environmentally friendly way. The GeoWell project will address the major bottlenecks like high investment and maintenance costs by developing innovative materials and designs that are superior to the state of the art concepts. The lifetime of a well often determines the economic viability of a geothermal project. Therefore, keeping the geothermal system in operation for several decades is key to the economic success. The objective of GeoWell is to develop reliable, cost effective and environmentally safe well completion and monitoring technologies. This includes: - Reducing down time by optimised well design involving corrosion resistant materials. - Optimisation of cementing procedures that require less time for curing. - Compensate thermal strains between the casing and the well. - Provide a comprehensive database with selective ranking of materials to prevent corrosion, based on environmental conditions for liners, casings and wellhead equipment, up to very high temperatures. - To develop methods to increase the lifetime of the well by analysing the wellbore integrity using novel distributed fiber optic monitoring techniques. - To develop advanced risk analysis tools and risk management procedures for geothermal wells. The proposed work will significantly enhance the current technology position of constructing and operating a geothermal well. GeoWell aims to put Europe in the lead regarding development of deep geothermal energy. The consortium behind GeoWell constitutes a combination of experienced geothermal developers, leading academic institutions, major oil&gas research institutions and an SME. These have access to world-class research facilities including test wells for validation of innovative technologies and laboratories for material testing.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.72M | Year: 2016

Thousands of sites across Europe are polluted with toxic metals and organic solvents; many more exist worldwide. As EU population grows, clean water will determine the quality of life and economic stability. Most sites remain contaminated because existing technology is costly and disruptive. Society needs an innovative way to decontaminate soil and groundwater directly underground. In METAL-AID, we will develop new technologies through fundamental knowledge. We are a consortium of experts in natural materials, contaminant reactivity, groundwater treatment and environment policy, spread over 4 consulting firms, 6 universities and a government agency. We will train 14 early stage researchers (ESRs) through integrated, intersectoral research, using advanced technology, ranging from nanometre to field scale. ESRs will gain technical, business and personal skills, as they push a promising soil and groundwater remediation technology toward commercialisation. To meet the METAL-AID goals, the ESRs will: 1) Test known layered double hydroxide (LDH) and redox active green rust (GR) reactants that show promise for remediating toxic metals and chlorinated compounds and invent new ones; 2) Derive thermodynamic and kinetic data, essential for safety assessment modelling; 3) Quantify reactant effectiveness and reacted phase stability and compare these with natural analogues; 4) Inject the new reactants at field sites operated by our beneficiaries. METAL-AID begins at technology readiness level, TRL 1 and runs to TRL 6, implementation. The government agency will provide guidance so our new technology complies with regulations and has promised R&D funding after the ETN ends, to carry it into full commercialisation. The ESRs will be trained to tackle challenges of concern to society, to communicate across sector boundaries and with the public, in a network that will last long after the project ends. We will provide a pool of scientists for roles in EUs knowledge based economy.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.88M | Year: 2016

Flood risk systems are characterised by physical and socio-economic processes acting at different space-time scales, by non-stationary and non-linear behaviour, and by a significant degree of interdependence between processes. This may lead to surprising developments and unanticipated side effects of risk reduction measures. A novel systems approach is needed that captures this dynamics and accounts for the interactions of the system components. We propose the ETN SYSTEM-RISK which aims at developing this systems approach for large spatial scales, from large river basins to the European scale. The research concept of SYSTEM-RISK builds upon the entire risk chain, from the source of hazard to consequences, and analyses the interactions and temporal dynamics in flood risk systems. In this way, the linear risk chain is replaced by a more realistic approach with interdependent links. SYSTEM-RISK exposes early-stage researchers (ESR) to all knowledge domains along the risk chain, and gives them, at the same time, the opportunity to build specific research profiles. The interdisciplinary setting and the focus on interactions and spatio-temporal dynamics of risk system will expand the mental models and lead to a new generation of creative scientists, able to transfer their systems perspective from flood risk systems to other fields. We bring together internationally leading groups in flood research with institutions from the non-academic main sectors exploiting flood research consultancy, insurance industry and governmental sector. Close interaction will support the ESRs in developing trans-disciplinary skills with an understanding of both fundamental science and application. SYSTEM-RISK will deliver a suite of methods and tools for assessing and managing flood risk across large regions. This will be of highest importance for the EU Flood Directive and Strategy on Adaptation for Climate Change due to the EUs key role in dealing with risks transcending national borders.

Loading Helmholtz Center Potsdam collaborators
Loading Helmholtz Center Potsdam collaborators