Hellenic Forest Service

Attiki, Greece

Hellenic Forest Service

Attiki, Greece
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Liordos V.,Hellenic Forest Service | Liordos V.,Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Institute of Technology
Zoology and Ecology | Year: 2014

Knowledge of hunters' behaviour is critical for the proper management of hunting. The preferences and sociodemographic characteristics of a Greek hunting community, the Megara Hunting Club, were therefore investigated through a questionnaire survey. Club members were mostly less than 50 years old with a family, mainly self-employed, farmers or private employees of secondary education and mostly having medium or higher income. All income classes preferred local over national licences, although the lower class did so in higher proportions. Megara hunters pursued the local small game, for which they also searched elsewhere. They were strongly attached to hunting as a sport, except for the poorest who hunted for subsistence. Furthermore, local hunters spent annually on average 58.3 days and € 1764.6, with the middle-aged, highly educated or wealthier hunters being the most dedicated to hunting in terms of both time and money. Considering the ongoing Greek debt crisis, an increase in the demand of local game and a shift towards subsistence hunting is predicted. Research offered important new insights for the practice of hunting and could be used as an aid for the design and application of informed policy and management plans in Greece and also in other comparable countries. © 2014 Nature Research Centre.


Liordos V.,Hellenic Forest Service | Liordos V.,Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Institute of Technology
European Journal of Wildlife Research | Year: 2014

The membership trends and attitudes of a Greek hunting community, the Megara Hunting Club, were determined through the analysis of 408 questionnaires. The number of hunting licences increased from 2003 to 2008, decreasing thereafter, mostly because a proportion of hunters holding a national licence quit hunting. This was in agreement with the onset of the national debt crisis and the concurrent decrease of the gross domestic product. Factor analysis revealed that hunters rather agreed that a ‘systemic’ (mean score 3.48) and rather disagreed that a ‘legal’ (2.59) factor negatively affected the practice of hunting, while they agreed that a ‘game status’ factor (4.06) was important. In particular, they contended that improved hunting administration and stakeholder collaboration are needed (systemic dimension), and game populations have declined due to anthropogenic activities such as illegal hunting, pollution, habitat loss and climate change (game status dimension). Findings suggest that, in the light of the ongoing economic crisis, immediate action should be taken toward the retention of hunters and protection and enhancement of game, through the application of appropriate policy and management measures. © 2014, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Thanou E.,University of Patras | Giokas S.,University of Patras | Goutner V.,Aristotle University of Thessaloniki | Liordos V.,Hellenic Forest Service | Fraguedakis-Tsolis S.,University of Patras
Annales Zoologici Fennici | Year: 2013

The applicability of simple PCR-based approaches for sex discrimination in the three European Phalacrocoracidae species was tested, using 93 individuals of known sex and two sets of primers (1237L/1272R and 2550F/2718R) for the amplification of the avian sex-specific chromo-helicase-DNA-binding protein gene. We evaluated the accuracy of each set of primers in providing the correct sex for each individual. The first primer set did not produce reliable results. The second provided a band pattern for each sex, easily distinguishable with agarose gel electrophoresis, which correctly identified all the individuals, even in samples of low DNA yield. The amplification products were sequenced and aligned revealing important nucleotide diversity among Phalacrocoracidae species. Compared with morphometric discriminant analysis and DNA-fingerprinting techniques previously applied, the PCR-based sexing with the 2550F/2718R primers is more accurate, less invasive and widely applicable to both adults and chicks, using a variety of DNA sources such as blood, tissue, feathers, egg shells and others. © Finnish Zoological and Botanical Publishing Board 2013.


Liordos V.,Hellenic Forest Service
Acta Ethologica | Year: 2012

The population dynamics and behaviour of the larid assemblage of a Mediterranean coastal wetland, the Vourkari inlet in Greece, were studied during the winter of 2008-2009. More black-headed gulls (Larus ridibundus) were seen in the inlet in December, more Mediterranean gulls (Larus melanocephalus) were present from mid-January to mid-February, while little variation was observed in yellow-legged gull (Larus michahellis) numbers throughout winter. Bird numbers remained stable through the day for the yellow-legged gull, but fewer black-headed and Mediterranean gulls were present in the late morning than the other periods. Diurnal activity patterns showed that feeding was the primary behaviour for yellow-legged gulls and resting and sleeping for black-headed and Mediterranean gulls, with locomotion being equally important for all species. All larids were primarily feeding in the late morning period, but yellow-legged gulls were doing so in much higher proportions. These contrasting patterns suggested that the Vourkari inlet was more important as a day roost for black-headed and Mediterranean gulls and a preferred feeding ground for yellow-legged gulls. Furthermore, results suggested that resting and sleeping were interchangeable activities and all other activities had more or less the same time demands on a daily basis, and also a consistent pattern across species in sleeping proportions that might indicate cross-species synchrony in sleep patterns; however future research is needed to resolve these issues. This study provided important new information on the winter ecology of three larids and revealed patterns of wetland use by these species that could help assess the importance of certain areas and improve coastal habitat management strategies to benefit birds. © 2011 Springer-Verlag and ISPA.


Liordos V.,Hellenic Forest Service
Zoological Studies | Year: 2010

The foraging behavior of the waterbird assemblage of a small Mediterranean coastal wetland at Vourkari inlet, Saronikos Gulf, Greece, was studied during the wintering season of 2007-2008. The foraging habitat types and feeding techniques used by each individual of 14 species were recorded during 30 sessions, each involving 4 observation points from which the entire wetland could be scanned. Seven habitat types and 11 feeding techniques were used by waterbirds during the study period. The waterbird assemblage was classified into 5 foraging guilds: stalking ardeids (1 egret and 1 heron), shallow-water divers (1 cormorant and 1 grebe), shallow-water generalists (2 ducks and 4 gulls), shallow-water plunge-divers (1 tern), and mudpeckers (3 small shorebirds). The low bidimensional niche breadth of most species, except gulls, and the low niche overlap among species of different guilds suggested a relatively high degree of specialization within this waterbird assemblage. In contrast, the overlap between species of the same guild was high, although variations in the use of habitats and mainly feeding techniques did occur. Intra-guild habitat partitioning was also observed, with diving and gull species using different zones of shallow-water areas. The 2 main habitats, shallow waters and intertidal mudflats, were the most important for waterbirds, with halophytic vegetation being important only for Little Egrets Egretta garzetta. The information provided herein is useful for a better understanding of birds' habitat requirements and the future management and conservation of coastal wetlands.


Liordos V.,Hellenic Forest Service
Journal of Biological Research | Year: 2011

The waterbird assemblage of a small shallow coastal wetland, the Vourkari inlet, western Attiki, Greece, was studied in 2008. Weekly counts revealed distinctive seasonal patterns of occurrence and abundance. A total of 54 species of waterbirds were recorded, 22 of which were regular visitors and 32 scarce vagrants and were classified as residents, winter and early spring migrants, autumn migrants, and spring migrants. The highest total numbers of individuals were observed in winter and early spring migration. The monthly number of species varied from 6 in June to 29 in October and was not correlated with the monthly total population size (rs=0.420, n=12, ns). The yellow-legged gull (Larus michahellis), little egret (Egretta garzetta), grey heron (Ardea cinerea), common redshank (Tringa totanus) and dunlin (Calidris alpina) were regularly observed in most of the months, whilst the black-headed gull (Larus ridibundus), Mediterranean gull (Larus melanocephalus), yellow-legged gull, sandwich tern (Sterna sandvicensis), great cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo), common redshank and little egret were the most abundant. The inlet holds nationally important wintering populations of the common shelduck (Tadorna tadorna), little egret, common redshank and sandwich tern. At least 13 of the regularly occurring species have an unfavourable conservation status on the national and/or international level. The Vourkari inlet hosts a diverse waterbird assemblage and its value lies more in its use as a feeding, roosting and staging site for wintering and migrating waterbirds. The inlet is currently threatened by overexploitation and conservation efforts should focus therefore on its protection and improvement through the designation of a wildlife refuge and with appropriate habitat management interventions.

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