Hei Longjiang Province Key Laboratory of Research on Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine

Harbin, China

Hei Longjiang Province Key Laboratory of Research on Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine

Harbin, China
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Meng C.,Harbin Medical University | Meng C.,Hei Longjiang Province Key Laboratory of Research on Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine | Ma L.,Harbin Medical University | Liu J.,Harbin Medical University | And 9 more authors.
Experimental Biology and Medicine | Year: 2016

Carbon monoxide (CO) attenuates lung ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) via inhalation, and as an additive dissolved in flush/preservation solution. This study observed the effects of lung inflation with CO on lung graft function in the setting of cold ischemia. Donor lungs were inflated with 40% oxygen+60% nitrogen (control group) or with 500ppm CO+40% oxygen+nitrogen (CO group) during the cold ischemia phase and were kept at 4℃ for 180min. Recipients were sacrificed by exsanguinations at 180min after reperfusion. Rats in the sham group had no transplantation and were performed as the recipients. Compared with the sham group, the oxygenation determined by blood gas analysis and the pressure–volume curves of the lung grafts decreased significantly, while the wet weight/dry weight (W/D) ratio, inflammatory reaction, oxidative stress, and cell apoptosis increased markedly (P<0.05). However, compared to the control group, CO treatment improved the oxygenation (381±58 vs. 308±78mm Hg) and the pressure–volume curves (15.8±2.4 vs. 11.6±1.7mL/kg) (P<0.05). The W/D ratio (4.6±0.6) and the serum levels of interleukin-8 (279±46pg/mL) and tumor necrosis factor-α (377±59pg/mL) in the CO group decreased significantly compared to the control group (5.8±0.8, 456±63pg/mL, and 520±91pg/mL) (P<0.05). In addition, CO inflation also significantly decreased malondialdehyde activity and apoptotic cells in grafts, and increased the superoxide dismutase content. Briefly, CO inflation in donor lungs in the setting of cold ischemia attenuated lung IRI and improved the graft function compared with oxygen. © 2015, © 2015 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.


Meng C.,Harbin Medical University | Meng C.,Hei Longjiang Province Key Laboratory of Research on Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine | Ma L.,Harbin Medical University | Niu L.,Chinese People's Liberation Army | And 11 more authors.
Life Sciences | Year: 2016

Aims Lung ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) may be attenuated through carbon monoxide (CO)'s anti-inflammatory effect or hydrogen (H2)'s anti-oxidant effect. In this study, the effects of lung inflation with CO, H2, or both during the cold ischemia phase on graft function were observed. Materials and methods Rat donor lungs, inflated with 40% oxygen (control group), 500 ppm CO (CO group), 3% H2 (H2 group) or 500 ppm CO + 3% H2 (COH group), were kept at 4 °C for 180 min. After transplantation, the recipients' artery blood gas and pressure-volume (P-V) curves were analyzed. The inflammatory response, oxidative stress and apoptosis in the recipients were assessed at 180 min after reperfusion. Key findings Oxygenation in the CO and H2 groups were improved compared with the control group. The CO and H2 groups also exhibited significantly improved P-V curves, reduced lung injury, and decreased inflammatory response, malonaldehyde content, and cell apoptosis in the grafts. Furthermore, the COH group experienced enhanced improvements in oxygenation, P-V curves, inflammatory response, lipid peroxidation, and graft apoptosis compared to the CO and H2 groups. Significance Lung inflation with CO or H2 protected against IRI via anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-apoptotic mechanisms in a model of lung transplantation in rats, which was enhanced by combined treatment with CO and H2. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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