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College Station, TX, United States

Shilling R.L.,Heat Transfer Research Inc.
Heat Transfer Engineering | Year: 2012

Fouling is a costly problem in heat exchanger design and operation. Over the past 20-30 years, design capabilities have advanced such that most fouling can be mitigated through effective design techniques. A design margin is added to the initial clean design in order to handle uncertainties in design and any deterioration in performance due to the reduced fouling that occurs in spite of good design practice. This article explains the advantages and disadvantages of three common methods for adding design margin to heat exchangers. It then introduces a new design margin method that combines the strengths of the previous three while avoiding their weaknesses. © 2012 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC. Source


Shilling R.L.,Heat Transfer Research Inc.
Chemical Engineering Progress | Year: 2012

Tube inserts are useful tools that improve tubeside performance in heat exchangers. The best insert type and design for a particular application depends on flow conditions and fluid properties. Inserts that augment single-phase heat transfer use one or more of the four distinct mechanisms to compensate for boundary layer effects, static mixing, boundary layer interruption, swirl flow, and displaced flow. Static mixing is the physical interchange of fluid particles to different locations in the flow stream by mechanical means. At higher Graetz numbers, the thickness of the laminar boundary layer can easily be reduced by boundary layer interruption inserts. It trips the boundary layer, causing it to thin to its minimum thickness, which enhances heat transfer. Displaced flow inserts increase heat transfer by blocking the flow area farthest from the tube wall, which creates higher velocities along the tube wall heat transfer surface. Source


Bouhairie S.,Heat Transfer Research Inc.
Chemical Engineering Progress | Year: 2012

Some of the steps that need to be followed to select the appropriate baffle for shell-and-tube heat exchangers are discussed. Baffles play a crucial role in regulating shellside fluid flow and improving heat transfer between shellside and tubeside process fluids. It is essential to remember that baffles are available in a range of shapes and sizes, and the most common among these is the segmental baffle. The Tubular Exchanger Manufacturers Association, Inc., (TEMA) provides design guidelines for segmental baffles. TEMA baffles can be single- or multi-segmental, or tube support plates, while tube support plates are used in the no-tubesin-window (NTIW) design to ensure that all baffles support every tube, eliminating tubes with long unsupported spans. TEMA standards also specify that the minimum spacing between segmental baffles need to be the larger of one-fifth of the shell inside diameter or 51 mm. Source


Trademark
Heat Transfer Research Inc. | Date: 2016-05-18

Computer software for the design and performance evaluation of heat transfer equipment.


Trademark
Heat Transfer Research Inc. | Date: 2010-01-12

Computer software for the design and performance evaluation of heat transfer equipment.

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