Tel Aviv, Israel
Tel Aviv, Israel

Time filter

Source Type

News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Tim Henry, M.D., Director, Division of Cardiology in the Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and Co-Principal Investigator of the ALLSTAR Trial, added, "We are encouraged to see reductions in left ventricular volume measures in the CAP-1002 treated patients, an important indicator of reverse remodeling of the heart. These findings support the biological activity of CAP-1002." Following Capricor's recent report of positive six-month data on clinical measures of skeletal muscle performance and cardiac biomarkers in the ongoing randomized 25-patient Phase I/II HOPE Trial of CAP-1002 in boys and young men with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the Company plans to initiate enrollment into a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, repeat-dose clinical trial of intravenous CAP-1002 in DMD in the second half of 2017, subject to regulatory approval. This anticipated trial will primarily evaluate skeletal (non-cardiac) muscle function. "The lack of a clear difference in the change in scar size from baseline to six months between the active and control groups in the interim observations from ALLSTAR was unexpected. These results diverge from the consistent and extensive record of activity observed with our cell technology in the setting of cardiac fibrosis as demonstrated by both preclinical and clinical studies, and we hope to gain an understanding of the factors that led to these observations through the conduct of further analyses," said Linda Marbán, president and CEO of Capricor. "Although we are disappointed, the favorable safety profile demonstrated by CAP-1002 in ALLSTAR supports the prospect of its chronic, repeat administration in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Also, the potent anti-inflammatory properties of CAP-1002 may be well-suited to mitigate DMD progression, for which chronic inflammation is believed to play a causative role," added Dr. Marbán. Capricor plans to reduce the scope of its operations, including the size of its workforce, in order to focus its financial resources primarily on its DMD program. Capricor management will hold a conference call at 5:00 a.m. PDT / 8:00 a.m. EDT today. The live call may be accessed by dialing (866) 868-1282 (domestic) or (847) 413-2405 (international) and by using the passcode 7330466. Access to the live webcast as well as the link to the replay of the call can be found at http://wsw.com/webcast/cc/capr2. The webcast will be archived for approximately 30 days. As previously announced, on May 15, 2017, Capricor will report its financial results for the first quarter of 2017. Capricor Therapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ: CAPR) is a clinical-stage biotechnology company developing first-in-class biological therapies for cardiac and other medical conditions. Capricor's lead candidate, CAP-1002, is a cell-based candidate currently in clinical development for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, myocardial infarction (heart attack), and heart failure. Capricor is also exploring the potential of CAP-2003, a cell-free, exosome-based candidate, to treat a variety of disorders. For more information, visit www.capricor.com. The ALLSTAR Trial is funded in part by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine. Statements in this press release regarding the efficacy, safety, and intended utilization of Capricor's product candidates; the initiation, conduct, size, timing and results of discovery efforts and clinical trials; the pace of enrollment of clinical trials; plans regarding regulatory filings, future research and clinical trials; plans regarding current and future collaborative activities and the ownership of commercial rights; scope, duration, validity and enforceability of intellectual property rights; future royalty streams, expectations with respect to the expected use of proceeds from the recently completed offerings and the anticipated effects of the offerings, and any other statements about Capricor's management team's future expectations, beliefs, goals, plans or prospects constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Any statements that are not statements of historical fact (including statements containing the words "believes," "plans," "could," "anticipates," "expects," "estimates," "should," "target," "will," "would" and similar expressions) should also be considered to be forward-looking statements. There are a number of important factors that could cause actual results or events to differ materially from those indicated by such forward-looking statements. More information about these and other risks that may impact Capricor's business is set forth in Capricor's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016, as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 16, 2017, and in its Registration Statement on Form S-3, as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 28, 2015, together with prospectus supplements thereto. All forward-looking statements in this press release are based on information available to Capricor as of the date hereof, and Capricor assumes no obligation to update these forward-looking statements. CAP-1002 is an Investigational New Drug and is not approved for any indications. Capricor's exosomes technology, including CAP-2003, has not yet been approved for clinical investigation. For more information, please contact: To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/capricor-therapeutics-provides-update-on-allstar-trial-300456715.html


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

SMITHTOWN, NY--(Marketwired - May 8, 2017) - iGambit Inc. ( : IGMB) announced that Dr. Benedict S Maniscalco has joined its Senior Advisory Board. This follows the acquisition of HubCentrix and the CyberCare Health Network Chronic Care Management System. Both companies operate as HealthDatix, Inc. The goal of HealthDatix is to identify the patient's eligibility for Medicare reimbursed doctor visits to access and assist in the well-being and cultivation of a healthy lifestyle. Additionally HealthDatix will be able to provide an FDA approved, Medicare covered platform, for continuous management of chronic care patients. Our continuous care platform will be tailored for individual care and health management of patients susceptible to chronic illness. This will include CyberCare's wearable medical watch. Dr. Benedict S. Maniscalco, M.D. received his medical degree from the Duke University School of Medicine in 1967. He interned at Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta and did his junior and senior residencies at Emory University Affiliated Hospitals, followed by a fellowship in Cardiovascular diseases from 1973-1975. He is licensed to practice in both Florida and Georgia and is certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine and the American Sub-Specialty Board in Cardiovascular disease. From 1976 through early 1979 Dr. Maniscalco was on the faculty of the University of South Florida School of Medicine, division of Cardiology in Tampa, Florida. Later in 1979, Dr. Maniscalco was recruited to establish the cardiac catheterization laboratory at St. Joseph's hospital in Tampa. He subsequently expanded the program and founded the nationally recognized St. Joseph's Heart Institute which served as a model for cardiovascular programs throughout the country. Dr. Maniscalco served as Chief of Cardiology and Director of the cardiac catheterization laboratory until from its founding through 2001. In this capacity, many of the innovative procedures and technology of modern cardiovascular services were implemented. While Director of the Heart Institute, Dr. Maniscalco was an officer and director of a large multi-specialty cardiovascular group practice. Over his distinguished career, Dr. Maniscalco has served as a consultant, opinion leader and speaker for numerous companies in both the pharmaceutical and device industry. He has lectured throughout the country for both medical and industry colleagues. He has been involved and led many research efforts in both clinical and non-clinical areas of investigation. Dr. Maniscalco has been a member of and served many professional medical societies. In the American College of Cardiology, he served in many capacities at the local, state and national levels. He has made significant contributions on numerous committees and in many capacities including his tenure as President and Governor of the Florida Chapter of the American College of Cardiology. His specific contributions in the areas of health policy and socioeconomic issues were numerous. Today, Dr. Maniscalco continues his devotion to patients in a consultative and prevention cardiology practice in Tampa, Florida and on an international basis as CEO and Chairman of Heartbeat International Foundation (HBI)! HBI provides pacemakers, defibrillators and other cardiac services to the less fortunate in developing countries of the world. Over 15,000 patients' lives have been saved or changed by the efforts of Heartbeat International and the many volunteer physicians and colleagues worldwide. John Salerno, Chairman of iGambit: "We are very pleased to have Dr. Maniscalco join us in our new business opportunity. His experience and knowledge together with others that will be joining us will set a standard by which we deliver excellence in services and technology." About iGambit Inc: iGambit ( : IGMB) is a fully reporting publicly-held company. We are a company focused on pursuing specific medical strategies and objectives. These objectives have included, among others, the acquisition of medical technology companies with strong growth potential easily recognized in the public arena. We believe that the back-ground of our management and of our Board of Directors in the technology markets is a valuable resource that makes us a desirable business partner. We expect to work to assume an active role in the development and growth of the new company, providing both strategic guidance and operational support. The management of iGambit believes that it can leverage its collective expertise to help position the combined company to produce high-margin, recurring and predictable earnings and generate long-term value for our stockholders. For more information, please visit www.igambit.com. Information on our web-site does not comprise a part of this press release. Certain statements in this document and elsewhere by iGambit are "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such information includes, without limitation, the business outlook, assessment of market conditions, anticipated financial and operating results, strategies, future plans, contingencies and contemplated transactions of the company. Such forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which may cause or contribute to actual results of company operations, or the performance or achievements of the company or industry results, to differ materially from those expressed, or implied by the forward-looking statements. In addition to any such risks, uncertainties and other factors discussed elsewhere herein, risks, uncertainties and other factors that could cause or contribute to actual results differing materially from those expressed or implied for the forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to fluctuations in demand; changes to economic growth in the U.S. and U.S. government policies and regulations, including, but not limited to those affecting the medical fertility clinic industry. iGambit undertakes no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. Actual results, performance or achievements could differ materially from those anticipated in such forward-looking statements as a result of certain factors, including those set forth in iGambit Inc.'s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Researchers have identified a microRNA biomarker that demonstrates a strong association with the incidence of atrial fibrillation, the most common abnormal heart rhythm that affects more than 2.7 million Americans. The researchers from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City have been seeking microRNA biomarkers to guide the diagnosis and potential treatment of troublesome heart conditions including atrial fibrillation and heart failure. For the study, the researchers sought biomarkers that could specifically predict the occurrence and severity of atrial fibrillation, said the study's lead author, Oxana Galenko, PhD, clinical research senior scientist in cardiovascular research at Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute. "We wanted to generate specific profiles of the molecules and see if they could be used to distinguish between the risk of atrial fibrillation in different groups of patients," Galenko said. The research team identified microRNAs, small, stable, noncoding RNA molecules that negatively control gene expression at a stage called the post-transcriptional level. These markers could potentially indicate which atrial fibrillation patients are most likely to benefit from ablation - a procedure that creates tissue scarring around the pulmonary veins and prevents electrical impulses from being misdirected, which can cause atrial fibrillation. Researchers will present results of the study at Heart Rhythm 2017, the Heart Rhythm Society's 38th Annual Scientific Sessions, in Chicago on Thursday, May 11, 2017. Atrial fibrillation is characterized by a rapid and irregular heartbeat caused when the top chambers of the heart quiver erratically, sometimes faster than 200 times per minute. The condition can have a significant negative impact on an individual's quality of life, causing heart palpitations, chronic fatigue, debilitating pain and can increase the risk of stroke fivefold. "From the research, we knew certain markers that were cited mostly for heart failure patients, so we knew which microRNAs we were going to look at, because we've looked at them before," said Victoria Jacobs, NP, PhD, a member of the research team. Atrial fibrillation has four subtypes, with two most common: Paroxysmal AF is episodic, while persistent AF lasts and has different degrees of severity. The researchers hoped to identify specific microRNAs involved in atrial fibrillation, with an eye toward using them to discriminate between the two subtypes. The Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute maintains an extensive bio bank that contains a large amount of biological and medical data that's collected by taking a small amount of blood from consenting patients, then banking those samples for future research. For the study, researchers used very small amounts of plasma from the bio bank. Because microRNAs are so small and stable, they can be detected in circulating biological fluids like saliva and blood. The researchers examined samples from 140 atrial fibrillation patients -- 93 paroxysmal and 47 persistent-- and 50 people with no identified heart disease who served as a control group. Researchers then examined several miRs that had been associated with atrial fibrillation, including 21, 291, 133a, 133b, 150 and 328. They were able to narrow it to miR 21. Researchers looked specifically at the concentration of microRNAs in the patients' circulating blood and found that risk of atrial fibrillation increased as levels of miR 21 decreased. While having low levels of the microRNA appears to be strongly associated with the development of atrial fibrillation, it wasn't associated with any differences between paroxysmal and persistent AF. The researchers believe that means the mechanism of how the disease occurs and its progression are different. In future studies, they hope to find out what initiates the disease. "As atrial fibrillation progresses, we know there's more fibrosis in the left atrium," said Dr. Jacobs. "We have theories of what causes the harmful fibrosis, including which pathways are activated to causes fibrosis. But we really don't know the cause yet. It's unclear if the microRNA carries the signals then it progresses to fibrosis or vice versa." Other researchers involved in the study include Madisyn Taylor; Matt Grover; Stacey Knight, PhD; Michael Cutler, DO, PhD; Brent Muhlstein, MD; John Carlquist, PhD; Kirk Knowlton, MD; and Jared Bunch, MD. The Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute is part of the Intermountain Healthcare system, which is based in Salt Lake City.


NORWALK, Conn.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation (MMRF) today announced that Ronald O. Perelman and Dr. Anna Chapman, through the Perelman Family Foundation, have committed more than $4 million in funding to launch the first ever research program solely dedicated to the early detection and prevention of multiple myeloma. This generous donation will seed the launch of the groundbreaking Perelman Family Foundation Early Disease Translational Research Program, part of the MMRF Prevention Project, to speed efforts toward early detection, delayed disease progression, and eventually, ultimately, prevention of this incurable disease. “The goal of this initiative is to develop a completely new paradigm for research in multiple myeloma, focusing on early detection and ultimately, prevention. Right now, detection of this terrible disease often comes too late. Unlike most cancers, early detection of multiple myeloma doesn't increase a person’s chance of survival under current treatment options. The Perelman Family Foundation Early Disease Translational Research Program will support research focused on improving outcomes after early detection. With the MMRF and our university partners, we are confident that we will be able to make breakthroughs for multiple myeloma patients, and that the program will serve as a model for future initiatives,” said Dr. Anna Chapman. The gift from the Perelman Family Foundation provides a catalyst for essential research focused on: better understanding genomic determinants of early disease progression; how microenvironment factors influence early disease progression; and enhancing patient tumor immunity. Perelman Family Foundation Early Disease Translational Research Program brings together six leading cancer research centers: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Rockefeller University, University of Arkansas for Medical Science, Yale University, as well as the MMRF. The studies conducted by these teams will identify novel targets and biomarkers of disease progression and enable the development of therapeutic approaches to delay or even stop progression to myeloma. “We are so thankful to Ronald and Anna for supporting our vision for a bold program that will take us one step closer to a future where our children and grandchildren will never need to worry about incurable cancers,” said the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation Founder Kathy Giusti. “Not only does the MMRF answer the questions of patients today and urgently deliver them the precise information and treatment they need to fight their multiple myeloma, but, with this generous donation, we will now also be able to focus on the patients of tomorrow.” Inspired by the dedication and vision of its Chairman and CEO Ronald O. Perelman and his family, the Perelman Family Foundation is firmly committed to philanthropy, focusing on women’s health, education and the arts. Ranked among the top philanthropists in the United States, Mr. Perelman is the founder of the Revlon/UCLA Women’s Cancer Research Program, which analyzes the causes of and develops groundbreaking treatment for breast and ovarian cancer. Launched in 1994, the program was responsible for the development of Herceptin, the first genetically-based treatment for a major cancer to be approved by the FDA, which currently cures more than thirty percent of breast cancer cases in women. In 2014, he co-founded, along with Barbra Streisand, the Women’s Heart Alliance to raise awareness, encourage action and drive new research to fight heart disease in women. Through the Perelman Family Foundation, Mr. Perelman supports the Ronald O. Perelman Center for Emergency Services and the Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology at NYU Langone Medical Center; the Ronald O. Perelman Heart Institute at New York Presbyterian Hospital, an internationally-recognized center offering comprehensive, innovative, and world-class cardiovascular care and heart health education; and the Ronald O. Perelman and Claudia Cohen Center for Reproductive Medicine at Weill Cornell Medicine. Multiple myeloma is a cancer of the plasma cell. It is the second most common blood cancer. An estimated 30,280 adults will be diagnosed this year and 12,590 people are predicted to die from the disease. The mission of the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation (MMRF) is to find a cure for multiple myeloma by relentless pursuing innovation that accelerates the development of next-generation treatments to extend the lives of patients. Founded in 1998 by Kathy Giusti, a multiple myeloma patient, and her twin sister Karen Andrews as a 501 (c) (3) nonprofit organization, the MMRF is a world-recognized leader in cancer research. Together with its partners, the MMRF has created the only end-to-end solution in precision medicine and the single largest genomic dataset in all cancers. The MMRF continues to disrupt the industry today, as a pioneer and leader at the helm of new research efforts. Since its inception, the organization has raised over $350 million and directs nearly 90% of the total funds to research and related programs. As a result, the MMRF has been awarded by Charity Navigator’s coveted four-star rating for 12 years, the highest designation for outstanding fiscal responsibility and exceptional efficiency.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

DALLAS, May 3, 2017 -- Nearly one in five people who reported the greatest number of cardiac risk factors did not believe they needed to improve their health, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. While most people in the study at the highest risk for a heart attack were more likely to agree on needed health improvements, more than half of those perceiving this need identified barriers to change, which were most commonly lack of self-discipline, work schedule and family responsibilities. "Understanding what motivates changes in behavior is key to improving the health of individuals and communities," said F. Daniel Ramirez, M.D, lead study author and a research fellow at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. "Our study sheds light on how knowledge of personally modifiable risk factors for heart attack, such as quitting smoking and exercising, affects people's perception of the need to improve their health." Researchers analyzed 45,443 responses from adults participating in the 2011-12 Canadian Community Health Survey. The survey gathered information about eight established risk factors for heart attack that people can change, including smoking, high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, stress, excessive alcohol consumption, lack of physical activity and poor diet. Along with high cholesterol, which was not included in the survey, researchers noted these factors account for 90 percent of heart attack risk. The survey also asked participants if they thought "there is anything you should do to improve your physical health?" Respondents who reported that they had high blood pressure or diabetes also weren't more likely to perceive the need to improve their health than those without those conditions. The survey did not include information about whether this group took medications to control these health problems, which may have affected their perceptions about the need to improve their health. Still, "lifestyle modifications are very important for these conditions, particularly diabetes, even for those on medications," said Benjamin Hibbert, M.D., Ph.D. senior study author and an interventional cardiologist and assistant professor at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute. The study also looked at factors that might bias results, including age, education, income and whether respondents had a regular healthcare provider. After adjusting for these factors, researchers found that older and white participants were more likely than younger and minority group members to express a desire to improve their health. Hibbert said the study's take-home message is that recognizing the risk factors for heart attack is effective for motivating some, but not all people to improve their physical health. Effectively convincing people to adopt and sustain healthy lifestyle changes requires a better understanding of what makes them tick, he said. Despite many similarities between Canada and the United States, researchers said they couldn't say whether differences in healthcare systems and culture would limit generalizing study findings to the United States. Co-authors are Yue Chen, Ph.D.; Pietro Di Santo, M.D.; Trevor Simard, M.D.; and Pouya Motazedian, B.Sc. Author disclosures are on the manuscript. Statements and conclusions of study authors published in American Heart Association scientific journals are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the association's policy or position. The association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations and health insurance providers are available at http://www. .


The International Nurses Association is pleased to welcome Jenean K. Ehlers, RN, CLNC, to their prestigious organization with her upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare. Jenean K. Ehlers is a Registered Nurse and Nurse Manager currently serving patients within Cedar County Memorial Hospital/ Cedar County Health Department in El Dorado Springs, Missouri. With over 35 years of experience in nursing, she has worked in the emergency room, OB, medical/surgical, Cardiac Rehab, In Home Services and County Health as well as a Certified Legal Nurse Consultant. Jenean K. Ehlers gained her Nursing Degree in 1981 from the Burge School of Nursing in Springfield, Missouri. Since graduating she has completed a number of advanced training courses, and is certified in Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation by Hammons Heart Institute in Springfield. Jenean has a wealth of experience as a Registered Nurse and looks forward to using this experience as a Certified Legal Nurse Consultant. She stays current in her field by maintaining a professional membership with the National Association of Certified Legal Nurse Consultants, and has been awarded the 35 Year Pin by Cedar County Memorial Hospital marking three and a half decades of continuous and exceptional service. She attributes her success to her love of nursing, and when she is not working, Jenean enjoys quilting, sewing, gardening/ farming, cooking, and is also a beekeeper. Learn more about Jenean K. Ehlers here: http://inanurse.org/network/index.php?do=/4136261/info/ and be sure to read her upcoming publication in Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare.


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

Ten million people in Europe alone suffer from cardiac insufficiency, or a weak heart. One day, many of them may require a heart transplant. Artificial heart pumps are frequently used to bridge the wait for the transplant. However, these pumps also have their drawbacks. A project involving Empa offers a possible solution. Artificial heart pumps can be tricky: blood clots may develop, causing a stroke, and the immune system may attack what it recognizes as foreign. In order to tackle this and other problems with artificial hearts, in 2011 University Medicine Zurich launched the Zurich Heart project in collaboration with the University Hospital Zurich, the University of Zurich and the ETH Zurich. Meanwhile, the consortium boasts more than 75 MDs, engineers, biologists and materials scientists. Zurich Heart aims to refine current heart pumps and find completely new, original solutions. The goal of the project is to develop a fully implantable artificial heart. Around 20 research groups in Switzerland and at the German Heart Institute in Berlin have pooled their outstanding expertise to realize this ambitious goal. As a materials research institute, Empa was a logical partner to contribute innovative solutions. “We’d like to make an artificial heart pump that works in a similar way to the human heart and has its inner surface covered with the patient’s own cells,” explains Edoardo Mazza, Head of Empa’s Mechanical Integrity of Energy Systems lab, professor at ETH Zurich and co-leader of Zurich Heart. Two teams from Empa, one from the field of biotechnology/biointerfaces, the other from the textiles sector, are working on this heart pump, which is “invisible” to the body’s blood clotting and immune system. But what have textiles got to do with human organs? More than you might think: after all, aren’t we talking about human tissue, about muscle fibers that can tear? And aren’t veins and arteries essentially nothing more than hollow fibers, through which our blood flows? “These days, textile development has nothing anymore to do with cotton T-shirts and the like,” says René Rossi, Head of Empa’s Biomimetic Membranes and Textiles lab. For him, a textile is when a one-dimensional material – a fiber – is turned into a two-dimensional entity. This might be fabric or tissue. “Theoretically, there are no bounds to the materials and properties,” explains Rossi. “The fibers can be made of metal, wood or synthetic material, and used to produce textiles or entities that are malleable, elastic, lightweight etc.” One of the main problems of current heart pumps is the fact that blood can start coagulating when it comes into contact with them. Blood clots can form, which roam around the body and can cause strokes or embolisms. If the surface of the artificial heart pump is given a kind of coating that the body perceives as a “natural” environment, however, blood clots could – at least in theory – be prevented. The inner surface of natural blood vessels is lined with a layer of endothelial cells, which control the exchange between the blood and body’s tissues. Therefore, Empa scientists are now working on an ultra-thin lining made of sticky polymer fibers that are less than a micrometer thick. Living endothelial cells are placed on this “fabric”, where they form a monolayer – as they do in all lymphatic and blood vessels. This kind of tissue surface could trick blood cells into thinking the pump is one of the body’s own organs. For the endothelial cells to feel at home in the artificial tissue, however, they need to be able to effectively “cling onto” the lining. A simple lining made of polymer fibers is ill-suited. This is where Empa’s electrospinning unit comes in. The technique is used to produce polymers, i.e. purely or-ganic and hybrid fibers measuring less than a micrometer in diameter, which makes novel membranes for use in medical engineering, catalysis and filter technology possible. An electric current is applied between a cannula, from which a polymer solution is squeezed, and a counter electrode – and this pulls threads. Thanks to the electric field, the threads twirl until they form a tissue-like membrane. Holding it in your hand, it feels like a wafer-thin, elastic cloth. “The membrane for the heart pump needs to be stable, firm and stretchable in all directions,” says Giuseppino Fortunato from the Biomimetic Membranes and Textiles lab. “It really has to withstand a lot.” After all, the heart beats around 100,000 times a day. This mixed tissue made of fibers and cells can also be produced in the incubator. The Biointerface lab headed by Katharina Maniura is in charge of the cells, using smooth muscle cells that form a cellular structure on the hybrid membrane – as found in natural blood vessels. Endothelial cells are then supposed to settle on this “substructure”. The cells feel particularly at home if they find a substructure that reminds them of the body’s own structures – more specifically, collagenous fibers such as from connective tissue. “We have to get muscle cells to produce collagen so the endothelial cells stick to it permanently,” explains Maniura. “If the tissue is composed of two types of cells, they emit signals and thus communicate with each other. This also has the effect that the endothelial cells are stabilized on the surface and readily perform their natural functions.” In order to render the electrospun fibers particularly attractive for the cells, the polymer fibers should be functionalized with cell adhesion peptides. The idea is for both the endothelial and the muscle fiber cells to be “presented” with their typical natural environment so the multi-layered structure lives as long as possible. Whether this also works in practice is being examined in a bioreactor. The material system, i.e. the synthetic elastomer pump wall developed by the Zurich Heart consortium, is exposed to “real” conditions together with Empa’s cell-textile mixture. The reactor recreates the situation in the human body, allows a cell culture liquid instead of blood to flow by, and simulates pulsations that mimic the movement of the heart muscle. This should show the researchers whether the “camouflaged” materials can withstand the heavy strain in the human body. “We will conduct a study using the first prototypes of the biomimetic heart pumps before the end of the year. But it will be many years before they can be used clinically,” says Mazza. The pumps each have to be “grown” individually using the patient’s own cells. Eventually, this will involve taking cells from the patients’ blood, vessels or fatty tissue. These will then be grown in the lab for two to three weeks before the heart pump with the endothelial layer can be implanted. “The concept would be too slow for emergency operations,” explains Mazza. Nonetheless, patients with a cardiac insufficiency could use the biomimetic pump to relieve the strain to such an extent that the heart is able to regenerate under its own steam – help it to help itself, as it were.


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

Ten million people in Europe alone suffer from cardiac insufficiency, or a weak heart. One day, many of them may require a heart transplant. Artificial heart pumps are frequently used to bridge the wait for the transplant. However, these pumps also have their drawbacks. A project involving Empa offers a possible solution. Artificial heart pumps can be tricky: blood clots may develop, causing a stroke, and the immune system may attack what it recognizes as foreign. In order to tackle this and other problems with artificial hearts, in 2011 University Medicine Zurich launched the Zurich Heart project in collaboration with the University Hospital Zurich, the University of Zurich and the ETH Zurich. Meanwhile, the consortium boasts more than 75 MDs, engineers, biologists and materials scientists. Zurich Heart aims to refine current heart pumps and find completely new, original solutions. The goal of the project is to develop a fully implantable artificial heart. Around 20 research groups in Switzerland and at the German Heart Institute in Berlin have pooled their outstanding expertise to realize this ambitious goal. As a materials research institute, Empa was a logical partner to contribute innovative solutions. “We’d like to make an artificial heart pump that works in a similar way to the human heart and has its inner surface covered with the patient’s own cells,” explains Edoardo Mazza, Head of Empa’s Mechanical Integrity of Energy Systems lab, professor at ETH Zurich and co-leader of Zurich Heart. Two teams from Empa, one from the field of biotechnology/biointerfaces, the other from the textiles sector, are working on this heart pump, which is “invisible” to the body’s blood clotting and immune system. But what have textiles got to do with human organs? More than you might think: after all, aren’t we talking about human tissue, about muscle fibers that can tear? And aren’t veins and arteries essentially nothing more than hollow fibers, through which our blood flows? “These days, textile development has nothing anymore to do with cotton T-shirts and the like,” says René Rossi, Head of Empa’s Biomimetic Membranes and Textiles lab. For him, a textile is when a one-dimensional material – a fiber – is turned into a two-dimensional entity. This might be fabric or tissue. “Theoretically, there are no bounds to the materials and properties,” explains Rossi. “The fibers can be made of metal, wood or synthetic material, and used to produce textiles or entities that are malleable, elastic, lightweight etc.” One of the main problems of current heart pumps is the fact that blood can start coagulating when it comes into contact with them. Blood clots can form, which roam around the body and can cause strokes or embolisms. If the surface of the artificial heart pump is given a kind of coating that the body perceives as a “natural” environment, however, blood clots could – at least in theory – be prevented. The inner surface of natural blood vessels is lined with a layer of endothelial cells, which control the exchange between the blood and body’s tissues. Therefore, Empa scientists are now working on an ultra-thin lining made of sticky polymer fibers that are less than a micrometer thick. Living endothelial cells are placed on this “fabric”, where they form a monolayer – as they do in all lymphatic and blood vessels. This kind of tissue surface could trick blood cells into thinking the pump is one of the body’s own organs. For the endothelial cells to feel at home in the artificial tissue, however, they need to be able to effectively “cling onto” the lining. A simple lining made of polymer fibers is ill-suited. This is where Empa’s electrospinning unit comes in. The technique is used to produce polymers, i.e. purely or-ganic and hybrid fibers measuring less than a micrometer in diameter, which makes novel membranes for use in medical engineering, catalysis and filter technology possible. An electric current is applied between a cannula, from which a polymer solution is squeezed, and a counter electrode – and this pulls threads. Thanks to the electric field, the threads twirl until they form a tissue-like membrane. Holding it in your hand, it feels like a wafer-thin, elastic cloth. “The membrane for the heart pump needs to be stable, firm and stretchable in all directions,” says Giuseppino Fortunato from the Biomimetic Membranes and Textiles lab. “It really has to withstand a lot.” After all, the heart beats around 100,000 times a day. This mixed tissue made of fibers and cells can also be produced in the incubator. The Biointerface lab headed by Katharina Maniura is in charge of the cells, using smooth muscle cells that form a cellular structure on the hybrid membrane – as found in natural blood vessels. Endothelial cells are then supposed to settle on this “substructure”. The cells feel particularly at home if they find a substructure that reminds them of the body’s own structures – more specifically, collagenous fibers such as from connective tissue. “We have to get muscle cells to produce collagen so the endothelial cells stick to it permanently,” explains Maniura. “If the tissue is composed of two types of cells, they emit signals and thus communicate with each other. This also has the effect that the endothelial cells are stabilized on the surface and readily perform their natural functions.” In order to render the electrospun fibers particularly attractive for the cells, the polymer fibers should be functionalized with cell adhesion peptides. The idea is for both the endothelial and the muscle fiber cells to be “presented” with their typical natural environment so the multi-layered structure lives as long as possible. Whether this also works in practice is being examined in a bioreactor. The material system, i.e. the synthetic elastomer pump wall developed by the Zurich Heart consortium, is exposed to “real” conditions together with Empa’s cell-textile mixture. The reactor recreates the situation in the human body, allows a cell culture liquid instead of blood to flow by, and simulates pulsations that mimic the movement of the heart muscle. This should show the researchers whether the “camouflaged” materials can withstand the heavy strain in the human body. “We will conduct a study using the first prototypes of the biomimetic heart pumps before the end of the year. But it will be many years before they can be used clinically,” says Mazza. The pumps each have to be “grown” individually using the patient’s own cells. Eventually, this will involve taking cells from the patients’ blood, vessels or fatty tissue. These will then be grown in the lab for two to three weeks before the heart pump with the endothelial layer can be implanted. “The concept would be too slow for emergency operations,” explains Mazza. Nonetheless, patients with a cardiac insufficiency could use the biomimetic pump to relieve the strain to such an extent that the heart is able to regenerate under its own steam – help it to help itself, as it were.


Annual Cardiologists Conference Series in a Mission to Fight Against Cardiac Diseases The three day event is expected to implant firm strategies in the field of Cardiology & Cardiovascular Treatment. The conceptual and applicable knowledge shared will also foster organizational collaborations to nurture scientific accelerations. The Cardiology Conference series brings together world-eminent speakers, most recent researches, latest treatment techniques and the advanced updates in Cardiology, Treatment and Management to highlight the principal features of this conference. Paris, France, May 03, 2017 --( The 18th Annual Cardiologists Conference is going to be held in Paris, France during June 19-21, 2017, revolving around the theme: “Building and Beating to the Future of the Heart.” This meeting has been CME Certified by the Spanish Society of Cardiology Accreditation Committee (CASEC) and they are providing 16 CME Credits to all the participants of this event. As we all know, Paris is known as the “City of Love,” therefore this meeting will also provide an opportunity to the attendees for exploring the city with exciting tourist attractions. This meeting will be fulfilled by the participation of eminent cardiologists, cardiac surgeons, cardio-thoracic surgeons, cardiac nurses, scientists, professors, medical students and business professionals from pharmaceutical companies from every corner of the world so that they can discuss their ideas and deliver their respective research works amongst others. Cardiologists 2017 will provide exposure to the on-going researches in Cardiology and related science fields. It will also provide insight to the novel inventions and techniques. It is very beneficial for the student Cardiologists and fellowship owners because it provides 16 CME credits which encourage discussions, provide networking opportunities, offer practical experience, explain new or modified regulations and give chance to introduce new ideas and approaches. It also gives opportunities to the companies to showcase their products and have face to face meetings with scientists which help them to increase their business opportunities. Cardiologists 2017 also gives companies to know about their market competitors. Cardiovascular disorder is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, cerebrovascular events and ischemic heart diseases, therefore one of the most important preventable causes of premature morbidity and mortality in developed and developing countries. It is often symptomless, so screening is vital before damage is done. Many surveys continue to show that Cardiac Disorder remains underdiagnosed, undertreated and poorly controlled. Blood Pressure has a skewed normal distribution within the population and the currently accepted model assumes risk is continuously related to BP. The few main topics of the event are- Heart Diseases, Hypertension, Electrocardiography, Pediatric & Geriatric Cardiology, Interventional Cardiology, Cardio-oncology, Diabetes & Heart, Cardio-thoracic Surgery, Cardiac Nursing and many more. For further details, please go through: http://annualmeeting.conferenceseries.com/cardiologists/ The Organizing Committee Members of this esteem event comprises- Prof. Guy Hugues Fontaine of La Salpêtrière Hospital, France, Dr. Roland Hetzer, Former Medical Director of German Heart Institute, Germany, Dr. Heinz-Peter Schultheiss, CEO of IKDT, Germany and many more. Contact us: Raul Wilson Program Manager Cardiologists 2017 Email: cardiologists@cardiologyconference.org; cardiologists@cardiologymeeting.com Paris, France, May 03, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Cardiology is the field of science which is related to heart. It deals with functions and disorders connected with blood, arteries and veins. The global cardiology market constitutes cardiac biomarkers, interventional cardiology and cardiovascular devices. It found that the global market for in vitro diagnostic tests for cardiac biomarkers was estimated at $3.1 billion in 2012 and nearly $4 billion in 2013. This market is predicted to reach $7.2 billion by 2018, at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 12.8% over the five-year period from 2013 to 2018. And the global market for emerging medical device technologies should reach $90.8 billion by 2021 from $55.9 billion in 2016 at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 10.2%, from 2016 to 2021.The 18th Annual Cardiologists Conference is going to be held in Paris, France during June 19-21, 2017, revolving around the theme: “Building and Beating to the Future of the Heart.” This meeting has been CME Certified by the Spanish Society of Cardiology Accreditation Committee (CASEC) and they are providing 16 CME Credits to all the participants of this event. As we all know, Paris is known as the “City of Love,” therefore this meeting will also provide an opportunity to the attendees for exploring the city with exciting tourist attractions. This meeting will be fulfilled by the participation of eminent cardiologists, cardiac surgeons, cardio-thoracic surgeons, cardiac nurses, scientists, professors, medical students and business professionals from pharmaceutical companies from every corner of the world so that they can discuss their ideas and deliver their respective research works amongst others.Cardiologists 2017 will provide exposure to the on-going researches in Cardiology and related science fields. It will also provide insight to the novel inventions and techniques. It is very beneficial for the student Cardiologists and fellowship owners because it provides 16 CME credits which encourage discussions, provide networking opportunities, offer practical experience, explain new or modified regulations and give chance to introduce new ideas and approaches. It also gives opportunities to the companies to showcase their products and have face to face meetings with scientists which help them to increase their business opportunities. Cardiologists 2017 also gives companies to know about their market competitors. Cardiovascular disorder is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, cerebrovascular events and ischemic heart diseases, therefore one of the most important preventable causes of premature morbidity and mortality in developed and developing countries. It is often symptomless, so screening is vital before damage is done. Many surveys continue to show that Cardiac Disorder remains underdiagnosed, undertreated and poorly controlled. Blood Pressure has a skewed normal distribution within the population and the currently accepted model assumes risk is continuously related to BP.The few main topics of the event are- Heart Diseases, Hypertension, Electrocardiography, Pediatric & Geriatric Cardiology, Interventional Cardiology, Cardio-oncology, Diabetes & Heart, Cardio-thoracic Surgery, Cardiac Nursing and many more.For further details, please go through: http://annualmeeting.conferenceseries.com/cardiologists/The Organizing Committee Members of this esteem event comprises- Prof. Guy Hugues Fontaine of La Salpêtrière Hospital, France, Dr. Roland Hetzer, Former Medical Director of German Heart Institute, Germany, Dr. Heinz-Peter Schultheiss, CEO of IKDT, Germany and many more.Contact us:Raul WilsonProgram ManagerCardiologists 2017Email: cardiologists@cardiologyconference.org; cardiologists@cardiologymeeting.com Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Cardiology Conference Series


News Article | April 6, 2017
Site: www.scientificcomputing.com

The American Heart Association Precision Medicine Platform -- a global, secure data discovery platform, recently developed in collaboration with Amazon Web Services (AWS) -- is now open for use. Researchers, physicians, computational biologists, computer engineers and trainees from around the globe can leverage this cloud-based resource to access and analyze volumes of cardiovascular and stroke data to accelerate the care of patients at risk of the number one killer in the United States and a leading global health threat. The AHA Institute for Precision Cardiovascular MedicineTM is calling on all cardiovascular and stroke dataset owners and stewards to share their data as the first step in acquiring all the pieces needed to treat and prevent heart failure, stroke, coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation and other cardiovascular diseases. Data from clinical trials, long-running epidemiologic studies, registries and real-time health data acquired through wearable devices and technology is sought. "We have blown away the barriers and welcome all to join this game-changing platform that promotes us working together as one community to ultimately benefit patients worldwide," said Jennifer Hall, PhD, the AHA's Chief of the Institute for Precision Cardiovascular Medicine. "The platform provides an opportunity to learn, search and discover in new and efficient ways, and we will keep working with the community to weave in new diverse data to help us drill deeper and enrich our understanding." Several organizations are leading the way toward the future of open data by contributing their information to the secure platform, including AstraZeneca, Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, Dallas Heart Study, Duke Cardiovascular Research Institute, Intermountain Health, the International Stroke Genetics Consortium, the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and Stanford University. "The increasing breadth and depth of medical data presents a tremendous opportunity to generate more nuanced and precise pre-diagnoses. However, leveraging this data requires tools capable of integrating data of diverse origin. The AHA Precision Medicine Platform can empower researchers with both the framework and tools to ease the burdens of data harmonization, amplifying the insight available from their own data." Said Gabriel Musso, PhD, VP Life Sciences, BioSymetrics Inc., who has been actively using the platform during the initial phase. The AHA Precision Medicine Platform is the only resource of its kind focused on cardiovascular diseases and stroke. "I am so excited for the potential the AHA Precision Medicine Platform brings for doing research across data sets to find consistent research results, and replicate and confirm research," said early adaptor Laura M. Stevens, a Predoctoral National Library of Medicine Fellow in the computational biosciences program at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical School. "The platform makes big data analyses much quicker and easier. It's a great foundation for implementing precision medicine and research in a clinical setting. I can't wait to see where this will take us as a research community." Researchers are not charged for accessing the data but will pay a fee for cloud computing capabilities based on the current AWS model. Any revenue from cloud-based computing will be used to fund AHA's research initiatives. "By working together on datasets we have the ability to test the speed, agility and transparency of research," said Hall. "With your data and your efforts, the AHA Precision Medicine Platform can help enable your discoveries of novel underlying causal factors of heart failure, new diagnostic biomarkers to predict stroke, or exponential new approaches to precision care for those with cardiovascular diseases and stroke." Through the tool, the AHA reaches across the government, academic, industry, and patient communities to deepen data resources and spur research opportunities with an aim to transform cardiovascular research and patient care. To further foster research aimed at reversing and preventing cardiovascular diseases and stroke, the AHA Institute for Precision Cardiovascular Medicine also offers a variety of grant opportunities for scientists and researchers from many different fields of study. The application process for several grants is currently open.

Loading Heart Institute collaborators
Loading Heart Institute collaborators