Deborah Heart and Lung Cente

Browns Mills, NJ, United States

Deborah Heart and Lung Cente

Browns Mills, NJ, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Corbisiero R.,Deborah Heart and Lung Cente | Buck D.C.,Deborah Heart and Lung Cente | Muller D.,St. Jude Medical | Bharmi R.,St. Jude Medical | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Interventional Cardiac Electrophysiology | Year: 2016

Background: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an effective treatment for heart failure (HF) with left ventricular systolic dysfunction and prolonged QRS interval. However, one third of patients do not benefit from treatment. This study compares the heart failure hospitalization (HFH) rates and corresponding costs between responders and non-responders to CRT. Methods: At a single center in New Jersey, we enrolled patients with de novo CRT-D implants between January 2011 and July 2013. Medical history at implant and all subsequent hospitalizations were collected. A retrospective chart review of the cardiology visit at or closest to 12 months post-CRT implant was performed, and patients were classified into responders and non-responders. Universal billing records (UB-04), ICD-9-CM diagnoses, and procedure codes were used to determine whether each hospitalization was due to HF. For each heart failure hospitalization (HFH), an MS-DRG-based US national average Medicare reimbursement was determined. HFH rates and associated payor costs were compared between responders and non-responders using negative binomial regression and non-parametric bootstrapping (×10,000), respectively. Results: CRT response was determined in 135 patients (n = 103 responders, n = 32 non-responders, average follow-up 1.4 years). Demographics, pre-implant HF characteristics, NYHA Class, QRS duration, ejection fraction (EF), left bundle branch block (LBBB) status, and co-morbidities were not statistically different between the two groups. The HFH rate was significantly lower in responders (0.43/patient year) compared to non-responders (0.96/patient year, IRR = 0.45, 95 % CI (0.23 0.90), P = 0.0197). Average US national Medicare reimbursement for the responder group (US$7205/patient year) was 48 % lower than that for the non-responder group (US$13,861/patient year, P = 0.035). Conclusion: In this single-center retrospective study, responders to CRT had significantly lower rates of post-implant heart failure hospitalization rate and reduced associated payor costs compared to non-responders. Therapies that increase CRT response rates can substantially reduce healthcare utilization. © 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York


PubMed | St. Jude Medical and Deborah Heart and Lung Cente
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of interventional cardiac electrophysiology : an international journal of arrhythmias and pacing | Year: 2016

Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an effective treatment for heart failure (HF) with left ventricular systolic dysfunction and prolonged QRS interval. However, one third of patients do not benefit from treatment. This study compares the heart failure hospitalization (HFH) rates and corresponding costs between responders and non-responders to CRT.At a single center in New Jersey, we enrolled patients with de novo CRT-D implants between January 2011 and July 2013. Medical history at implant and all subsequent hospitalizations were collected. A retrospective chart review of the cardiology visit at or closest to 12months post-CRT implant was performed, and patients were classified into responders and non-responders. Universal billing records (UB-04), ICD-9-CM diagnoses, and procedure codes were used to determine whether each hospitalization was due to HF. For each heart failure hospitalization (HFH), an MS-DRG-based US national average Medicare reimbursement was determined. HFH rates and associated payor costs were compared between responders and non-responders using negative binomial regression and non-parametric bootstrapping (10,000), respectively.CRT response was determined in 135 patients (n=103 responders, n=32 non-responders, average follow-up 1.4years). Demographics, pre-implant HF characteristics, NYHA Class, QRS duration, ejection fraction (EF), left bundle branch block (LBBB) status, and co-morbidities were not statistically different between the two groups. The HFH rate was significantly lower in responders (0.43/patient year) compared to non-responders (0.96/patient year, IRR=0.45, 95% CI (0.23 0.90), P=0.0197). Average US national Medicare reimbursement for the responder group (US$7205/patient year) was 48% lower than that for the non-responder group (US$13,861/patient year, P=0.035).In this single-center retrospective study, responders to CRT had significantly lower rates of post-implant heart failure hospitalization rate and reduced associated payor costs compared to non-responders. Therapies that increase CRT response rates can substantially reduce healthcare utilization.

Loading Deborah Heart and Lung Cente collaborators
Loading Deborah Heart and Lung Cente collaborators