Heart and Vascular Institute

Oak Lawn, IL, United States

Heart and Vascular Institute

Oak Lawn, IL, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

As American Heart Month kicks off, the Women’s Choice Award is challenging women across the U.S. to learn about the best hospitals in their communities for heart care. According to a recent study by Yale School of Medicine, where a patient goes for heart attack care may matter for both short and long-term risk of death. The Women’s Choice Award 2017 America’s Best Hospital’s for Heart Care uses an evidence-based methodology to select high-performing hospitals, including examination of 30-day survival rates, a measure Yale researchers found contributed to patients living an average of 9 to 14 months longer after a heart attack than those treated at low-performing hospitals. The study also found that high-performing hospitals keep patients who otherwise may have died healthier over the long term. “Heart disease is the leading killer of women,” said Delia Passi, founder and CEO of the Women’s Choice Award. “With such strong prevalence of heart disease, we want every woman to know where to find the very best heart care before she ever has an incident.” The methodology used to select America’s Best Hospitals for Heart Care is unique in that it evaluates: The Women’s Choice Award is encouraging women to learn which hospitals on the America’s Best list are “their heart hospitals” and to share the list with their circles of friends and loved ones through Facebook and other means during American Heart Month. “Women rely on other women for advice,” said Passi. “We’re encouraging women to share this potentially life-saving information as widely as possible.” The following hospitals have joined the Women’s Choice Award in empowering women and their families to make the best heart health choices: CHI St. Luke's Health Memorial, Lufkin, TX Comanche County Memorial Hospital, Lawton, OK Community Hospital, Munster, IN Florida Hospital North Pinellas, Tarpon Springs, FL Florida Hospital Zephyrhills, Zephyrhills, FL Harlingen Medical Center, Harlingen, TX Heart and Vascular Services at Hunterdon Medical Center, Flemington, NJ Heart Hospital of Lafayette, Lafayette, LA Hoffman Heart and Vascular Institute of Connecticut at Saint Francis Hospital and Medical Center, Hartford, CT Inter-Community Hospital, Covina, CA Jeffrey M. Carlton Heart & Vascular Institute at Hoag, Newport Beach, CA Norman Regional Health System, Norman, OK Parkview Medical Center, Pueblo, CO Queen of the Valley Hospital, West Covina, CA Riverside Medical Center, Kankakee, IL San Antonio Regional Hospital, Upland, CA Sharp Grossmont Hospital Heart & Vascular Center, La Mesa, CA Shasta Regional Medical Center, Redding, CA St. Catherine Hospital, East Chicago, IN St. Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood, KY St. Joseph’s Health, Syracuse, NY St. Luke's Hospital, Chesterfield, MO St. Mary Medical Center, Hobart, IN St. Peter’s Hospital, Albany, NY St. Tammany Parish Hospital, Covington, LA The Valley Hospital, Ridgewood, NJ Thomas Hospital, Fairhope, AL ABOUT THE WOMEN’S CHOICE AWARD® The Women’s Choice Award® is a trusted referral source, empowering women to make smart healthcare choices by identifying the country’s best healthcare institutions based on robust criteria that consider female patient satisfaction and clinical excellence. The Women’s Choice Award was recently honored by the INC 5000 List of America’s Fastest-Growing Private Companies in 2016 for a second consecutive year. Visit http://www.womenschoiceaward.com/ to learn more. The information contained in this release is not permitted to be used in a non-press related context without the express prior written consent of the Women’s Choice Award.


News Article | November 3, 2016
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Using specialized CT scans of a healthy heart and one with heart disease, a team of Johns Hopkins cardiologists and biomedical engineers say they've created computer models of the "shape" of blood flow through the heart's upper left chamber that someday may help predict stroke risk. Specifically, their computer visualizations found that blood in the diseased heart failed to flow in corkscrewlike "eddies" that most effectively moved blood out of the left atrium in the healthy heart and "showed us exactly how this motion would increase the risk of developing a blood clot," says Hiroshi Ashikaga, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of medicine and member of the Heart and Vascular Institute at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. The researchers say the same fluid motion analysis used in their two-heart proof-of-concept study may one day offer an accurate way to predict stroke risk in people with heart disease marked by enlargement and weakness of the cardiac muscle. A description of the study and its results was published in the November print issue of Annals of Biomedical Engineering. "By looking at blood flow through the atrium, we think we can accurately assess stroke risk better than such risk factors as heart size and pumping strength," says Ashikaga. "Our study fills in a missing diagnostic link between heart function and fluid motion in our understanding of how each can affect stroke risk." Before this study, Ashikaga notes, researchers knew that enlargement of the heart, particularly the left upper chamber, was linked to increased stroke risk, particularly in people with atrial fibrillation, an irregular and often very rapid heart rate. Heart disease experts estimate that more than 1.6 million Americans each year are diagnosed with symptoms of atrial fibrillation that put them at risk for strokes caused by blood that pools in the heart and forms a clot, then travels to the brain. The new study, Ashikaga says, sheds significant light on just how an enlarged and "floppy" atrium led to blood clot formation. To collect the data needed to create the blood flow models, the Johns Hopkins team recruited two patients with a history of atrial fibrillation -- a 58-year-old woman with a healthy heart and a 68-year-old man with an enlarged heart. Each underwent a CT scan of their heart. Using the images, the researchers then computed the movement of blood flow as it entered the left atrium from the pulmonary veins, then passed through a valve into the left lower chamber, or ventricle. Finally, they fashioned a video representation of the fluid motion of the blood. In visualizing the healthy heart, the researchers saw that the blood flow formed into tight, corkscrewlike motions that circled around into doughnut formations, known as vortexes. The researchers say the vortexes helped move the blood efficiently through the atrium quicker and with less contact with the atrium's surface tissue. See blood flow modelled in a healthy heart here. The diseased heart they chose to examine was enlarged due to overuse, muscle fatigue and scarring, all of which can promote atrial fibrillation. In the enlarged heart, the researchers noticed that at the top of the atrium, the blood never fully forms the corkscrews that loop around into vortexes. Instead, by the time the blood reaches the bottom of the atrium, it seems to be falling in "sheets" that coat the surface of the heart. See blood flow through a diseased heart here. "As the blood comes in contact with the atrium's surface, it slows down due to shearing forces similar to friction, and this appears to prevent the blood from exiting the chamber as smoothly as it might," says Ashikaga. "The slower the blood moves and the more contact it has with the atrium, the more risk there is for a clot to form." Ashikaga says his team is currently conducting a larger long-term study looking at the blood flow of many more people with normal and ailing hearts, and monitoring the incidence of stroke and other signs of blood clots over time. He also hopes to develop the CT scan and computer analysis into a tool to predict stroke risk. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an estimated 3 million to 6 million people have atrial fibrillation and nearly 800,000 people have strokes each year in the United States. The most common symptom of stroke is numbness or weakness on one side of the body. Physicians use CT scans of the brain, blood tests, EKGs, MRI scans or other imaging test to determine if a person has suffered from a stroke. Strokes may be treated with clot-busting drugs, blood thinners and sometimes surgery to remove the clot.


News Article | November 2, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Using specialized CT scans of a healthy heart and one with heart disease, a team of Johns Hopkins cardiologists and biomedical engineers say they've created computer models of the "shape" of blood flow through the heart's upper left chamber that someday may help predict stroke risk. Specifically, their computer visualizations found that blood in the diseased heart failed to flow in corkscrewlike "eddies" that most effectively moved blood out of the left atrium in the healthy heart and "showed us exactly how this motion would increase the risk of developing a blood clot," says http://www. , M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of medicine and member of the Heart and Vascular Institute at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. The researchers say the same fluid motion analysis used in their two-heart proof-of-concept study may one day offer an accurate way to predict stroke risk in people with heart disease marked by enlargement and weakness of the cardiac muscle. A description of the study and its results was published in the November print issue of Annals of Biomedical Engineering. "By looking at blood flow through the atrium, we think we can accurately assess stroke risk better than such risk factors as heart size and pumping strength," says Ashikaga. "Our study fills in a missing diagnostic link between heart function and fluid motion in our understanding of how each can affect stroke risk." Before this study, Ashikaga notes, researchers knew that enlargement of the heart, particularly the left upper chamber, was linked to increased stroke risk, particularly in people with atrial fibrillation, an irregular and often very rapid heart rate. Heart disease experts estimate that more than 1.6 million Americans each year are diagnosed with symptoms of atrial fibrillation that put them at risk for strokes caused by blood that pools in the heart and forms a clot, then travels to the brain. The new study, Ashikaga says, sheds significant light on just how an enlarged and "floppy" atrium led to blood clot formation. To collect the data needed to create the blood flow models, the Johns Hopkins team recruited two patients with a history of atrial fibrillation -- a 58-year-old woman with a healthy heart and a 68-year-old man with an enlarged heart. Each underwent a CT scan of their heart. Using the images, the researchers then computed the movement of blood flow as it entered the left atrium from the pulmonary veins, then passed through a valve into the left lower chamber, or ventricle. Finally, they fashioned a video representation of the fluid motion of the blood. In visualizing the healthy heart, the researchers saw that the blood flow formed into tight, corkscrewlike motions that circled around into doughnut formations, known as vortexes. The researchers say the vortexes helped move the blood efficiently through the atrium quicker and with less contact with the atrium's surface tissue. See blood flow modelled in a healthy heart here. The diseased heart they chose to examine was enlarged due to overuse, muscle fatigue and scarring, all of which can promote atrial fibrillation. In the enlarged heart, the researchers noticed that at the top of the atrium, the blood never fully forms the corkscrews that loop around into vortexes. Instead, by the time the blood reaches the bottom of the atrium, it seems to be falling in "sheets" that coat the surface of the heart. See blood flow through a diseased heart here. "As the blood comes in contact with the atrium's surface, it slows down due to shearing forces similar to friction, and this appears to prevent the blood from exiting the chamber as smoothly as it might," says Ashikaga. "The slower the blood moves and the more contact it has with the atrium, the more risk there is for a clot to form." Ashikaga says his team is currently conducting a larger long-term study looking at the blood flow of many more people with normal and ailing hearts, and monitoring the incidence of stroke and other signs of blood clots over time. He also hopes to develop the CT scan and computer analysis into a tool to predict stroke risk. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an estimated 3 million to 6 million people have atrial fibrillation and nearly 800,000 people have strokes each year in the United States. The most common symptom of stroke is numbness or weakness on one side of the body. Physicians use CT scans of the brain, blood tests, EKGs, MRI scans or other imaging test to determine if a person has suffered from a stroke. Strokes may be treated with clot-busting drugs, blood thinners and sometimes surgery to remove the clot. Additional authors of the study include Tomohiro Otani, Abdullah Al-Issa, Amir Pourmorteza and Elliot McVeigh of Johns Hopkins Medicine, and Shigeo Wada of Osaka University. The research was funded by grants from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Magic That Matters Fund for Cardiovascular Research and the Zegar Family Foundation.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

CLEVELAND--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Excelerate today announced that Valley Health System, located in Ridgewood, N.J., is expanding its relationship with Excelerate to include its complete clinical portfolio of physician preference items, surgical and specialty products and other clinical items to achieve immediate and sustainable savings. The new five-year agreement became effective Jan. 1, 2017. Excelerate is a joint venture between Cleveland Clinic, Vizient, Inc., and OhioHealth designed to provide enhanced value to members by offering a unique, physician-driven and evidence-based approach to sourcing. Valley Health System initially joined Excelerate in November 2015 to utilize its heart and vascular clinical portfolio. After realizing more than 20% in savings in that service line, Valley will now begin using all contracts for physician preference and clinical preference items in the portfolio. According to Leonard R. Guglielmo, Assistant Vice President, Facilities, and Chief Supply Chain Officer, Valley Health System, “Excelerate has added value on a few different levels and we’ve saved over a million dollars a year on the cardiac portfolio. A key part of this initiative is that Excelerate is based on physician to physician communication. In addition, it’s designed so that the physicians are the ones that drive the decisions to use products that are the optimal balance between cost and patient outcomes.” Excelerate’s provider-led, physician and clinician engaged sourcing model delivers significant savings to its members through: “We couldn't be happier or more honored Valley Health has expanded their supply chain portfolio with Excelerate. The incredible impact we have made on standardization and clinical quality alignment further enhances the impressive savings we have realized,” said Sean Lyden, MD, Chief Medical Officer for Excelerate and Department Chair of Vascular Surgery for Cleveland Clinic. “Valley Health represents a progressive organization with strong leadership and the fortitude to continue to grow and enhance our trusted platform of best-in-class contracts while driving supply chain operating and clinical best practices.” Excelerate is designed to deliver significant and substantial savings to health care organizations through a provider-led, physician-engaged sourcing company. Excelerate achieves this through executing data-driven, market-leading contracts, clinical utilization guidelines designed to decrease clinical variation, and providing peer-to-peer physician engagement that fosters clinical alignment enabling local change. Excelerate started in 2013 as a joint venture between Cleveland Clinic and Vizient, Inc. In 2016, OhioHealth was added as an equity owner and member. Click here to learn more about Excelerate. The Valley Hospital, a 451-bed, acute care, not-for-profit hospital located in Ridgewood, NJ, is part of Valley Health System, which also includes Valley Home Care and Valley Medical Group. Valley is the recipient of numerous awards and recognitions. These include Gold Seals of Approval from the Joint Commission in 14 clinical areas, including six for cancer care, more than any other hospital in the nation. Valley has also been recognized by Healthgrades as one of America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Orthopedic Surgery and with excellence awards for cranial neurosurgery and stroke. Valley has also been honored three times with “Magnet” designation – the nursing profession’s highest honor. Valley is a cardiovascular affiliate of the Cleveland Clinic Heart and Vascular Institute, and an academic and clinical affiliate of the Mount Sinai Health System. Key services include cardiology, oncology, women’s and children’s services, emergency care, orthopedics, and neurosciences. For more information please visit www.ValleyHealth.com


News Article | November 3, 2016
Site: www.gizmag.com

The course of blood through the heart might be a critical indicator of stroke risk(Credit: lightsource/ Depositphotos ) Donuts are not usually very high on the list when talking about healthy hearts, but it turns out that they might be critical to proper coronary blood flow – at least in terms of their shape. Researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine have recently found that the pattern blood takes while flowing through the heart's upper chamber can be a key indicator of blood clot formation and subsequent stroke risk. In their study, the researchers conducted CT scans of two hearts: one healthy and one that was enlarged due to heart disease. They then fed the information they gleaned into a series of computer visualizations and created videos of the blood's fluid motion in the heart's left atrium where it enters from the pulmonary veins and passes into the lower-left chamber known as the ventricle. They discovered that in the healthy heart, blood forms "eddies" that are shaped like corkscrews and resolve into vortices shaped like doughnuts. In the diseased heart, however, the blood failed to shape up into these formations and instead was falling in sheet-like patterns by the time it reached the bottom of the atrium. This can cause the blood to pool and form clots which can cause strokes if they travel to the brain. "As the blood comes in contact with the atrium's surface, it slows down due to shearing forces similar to friction, and this appears to prevent the blood from exiting the chamber as smoothly as it might," says Hiroshi Ashikaga, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of medicine and member of the Heart and Vascular Institute at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and one of the study authors. "The slower the blood moves and the more contact it has with the atrium, the more risk there is for a clot to form." The researchers believe this discovery can help them better assess stroke risk and they are now conducting a long-term study with more participants to add to their body of knowledge. "By looking at blood flow through the atrium, we think we can accurately assess stroke risk better than such risk factors as heart size and pumping strength," says Ashikaga. "Our study fills in a missing diagnostic link between heart function and fluid motion in our understanding of how each can affect stroke risk." You can see simulations of blood flow through a healthy heart here and through a diseased heart here.


News Article | October 21, 2015
Site: news.yahoo.com

Men and women will always have their differences, but a new analysis finds that these differences extend to heart anatomy. The "hearty" differences became apparent only after researchers studied nearly 3,000 adults for about 10 years. By the end of the study, published online today (Oct. 20) in the journal Radiology, the researchers found that male and female hearts grow differently over time. The study focused on one heart chamber, the left ventricle, which pumps oxygenated blood out of the heart into the body. As people age, the left ventricle declines in its capacity to pump blood. But the researchers found that this decline happens differently depending on a person's sex: In men, the heart muscle around the chamber grows larger and thicker with age, while in women the muscle maintains its size or gets smaller, the researchers found. [Your Heart Health: 5 Numbers to Know] It's unclear why these sex-based differences occur, but this "fascinating discrepancy" may help researchers determine whether gender-specific therapies are necessary for men and women who have heart problems, the researchers said. "Our results are a striking demonstration of the concept that heart disease may have different pathophysiology in men and women, and of the need for tailored treatments that address such important biologic differences," senior study author Dr. João Lima, a professor of medicine and radiological science at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore and director of cardiovascular imaging at the school's Heart and Vascular Institute, said in a statement. The study is the first long-term research using MRI scans to observe left ventricle structure and function over time, the researchers said. Other researchers have examined people's hearts using ultrasound scans, but MRI scans are more detailed, the researchers in the new study said. The study included 2,935 adults ages 45 to 84 years. None of the participants had cardiovascular diseases when they enrolled in the study. The doctors performed an MRI scan on each participant at the beginning and end of the study. From the scans, the doctors assessed the size and volume of the participant's left ventricle, and calculated its weight. Over the study period, the left ventricle in men gained an average of 0.3 ounces (8 grams). In contrast, it lost an average of 0.06 ounces (1.6 grams) in women, the researchers found. Moreover, the heart's filling capacity (the amount of blood the left ventricle can hold between heartbeats) fell in both sexes. But this was more pronounced in women, with a drop of about 0.4 fluid ounces (13 milliliters), compared to just under 0.3 fluid ounces (10 mL) in men. These differences emerged even after the researchers controlled for body weight, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, exercise levels and smoking. These sex-related differences suggest that "men and women may develop [heart] disease for different reasons," said lead investigator Dr. John Eng, an associate professor of radiological science at Johns Hopkins. [Don't Sit Tight: 6 Ways to Make a Deadly Activity Healthier] The findings may help doctors create gender-specific treatments, the researchers said. For instance, cardiologists often prescribe medications that reduce the thickness of heart muscle in people with heart failure. But this treatment might not benefit women as much as it does men, given that women's heart muscle tends to shrink or stay the same size over time, the researchers said. The study is part of an ongoing, long-term project named the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Researchers plan to continue following the nearly 7,000 people of different ethnic backgrounds who are enrolled, and studying factors that influence these people's heart diseases and failures, the investigators said. Copyright 2015 LiveScience, a Purch company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

'Heart Ball' Fundraiser Supports Heart and Vascular Institute's Continued Service of the Community SOMERSET, NJ--(Marketwired - Feb 16, 2017) - MTBC ( : MTBC) ( : MTBCP), a leading provider of proprietary, cloud-based electronic health records, practice management and mHealth solutions, was pleased to partner with Pikeville Medical Center ("Pikeville") on February 11, 2017 as a key event sponsor for the hospital's East Kentucky Heart Ball, which benefits Pikeville's Heart and Vascular Institute. Pikeville, a member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, has been dedicated to providing quality care to patients in Kentucky for almost a century. It operates a 300-bed facility that provides more than 400 services, including every major specialty and most subspecialties, and employs more than 3,000 employees and approximately 400 credentialed providers. MediGain Practice Management, an MTBC company, has provided end-to-end revenue cycle management services to Pikeville since October 2016. Each year, the East Kentucky Heart Ball fundraiser brings together a diverse mix of guests including medical, business, and political leaders. This year, more than 400 individuals attended the fundraiser to demonstrate their support. In reflecting on the 2017 fundraiser, Juanita Deskins, Pikeville's Chief Operating Officer, explained, "Pikeville Medical Center has been dedicated to providing high quality care to patients in Kentucky for almost a century and we appreciate MTBC's support in helping us achieve our important mission." Stephen Snyder, MTBC's President, stated, "We are honored to be able to partner with Pikeville." He continued, "The fulfillment of Pikeville's mission ensures that area residents can access top quality healthcare services and we're thrilled to be able to support Pikeville as they continue to serve the community." MTBC is a healthcare information technology company that provides a fully integrated suite of proprietary web-based solutions, together with related business services, to healthcare providers. Our integrated Software-as-a-Service (or SaaS) platform helps our customers increase revenues, streamline workflows and make better business and clinical decisions, while reducing administrative burdens and operating costs. MTBC's common stock trades on the NASDAQ Capital Market under the ticker symbol "MTBC," and its Series A Preferred Stock trades on the NASDAQ Capital Market under the ticker symbol "MTBCP." MTBC Acquisition, Corp., d/b/a "MediGain Practice Management," is a wholly owned subsidiary of MTBC. For additional information, please visit our website at www.mtbc.com. This press release contains various forward-looking statements within the meaning of the federal securities laws. These statements relate to anticipated future events, future results of operations or future financial performance. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terminology such as "may," "might," "will," "should," "intends," "expects," "plans," "goals," "projects," "anticipates," "believes," "estimates," "predicts," "potential," or "continue" or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology. Our operations involve risks and uncertainties, many of which are outside our control, and any one of which, or a combination of which, could materially affect our results of operations and whether the forward-looking statements ultimately prove to be correct. Forward-looking statements in this press release include, without limitation, statements reflecting management's expectations for future financial performance and operating expenditures, expected growth, profitability and business outlook, increased sales and marketing expenses, and the expected results from the integration of our acquisitions. These forward-looking statements are only predictions, are uncertain and involve substantial known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which may cause our (or our industry's) actual results, levels of activity or performance to be materially different from any future results, levels of activity or performance expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. New risks and uncertainties emerge from time to time, and it is not possible for us to predict all of the risks and uncertainties that could have an impact on the forward-looking statements, including without limitation, risks and uncertainties relating to: the Company's ability to manage growth; integrate acquisitions; effectively migrate and keep newly acquired customers and other important risks and uncertainties referenced and discussed under the heading titled "Risk Factors" in the Company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The statements in this press release are made as of the date of this press release, even if subsequently made available by the Company on its website or otherwise. The Company does not assume any obligations to update the forward-looking statements provided to reflect events that occur or circumstances that exist after the date on which they were made. Disclaimer: This press release is for information purposes only, and does not constitute an offer to sell or solicitation of an offer to buy, nor shall there be any sale of these securities in any state or other jurisdiction in which such offer, solicitation or sale would be unlawful prior to the registration or qualification under the securities laws of such state or jurisdiction.


Kaufman M.P.,Heart and Vascular Institute
Experimental Physiology | Year: 2012

This report summarizes work concerning the exercise pressor reflex performed in my laboratory over the past 20 years or so. It is part of a symposium held to celebrate the 40th anniversary of two publications by Dr Jere Mitchell that appeared in The Journal of Physiology. For the most part, this report concerns itself with the discharge properties of group III and IV muscle afferents. Particular attention has been paid to their responses to arterial injection of putative metabolic byproducts of muscular contraction as well as their responses to both static contraction and dynamic exercise. © 2011 The Author. Experimental Physiology © 2012 The Physiological Society.


Sale S.M.,Cleveland Clinic | Smedira N.G.,Heart and Vascular Institute
Best Practice and Research: Clinical Anaesthesiology | Year: 2012

End-stage heart failure represents a highly morbid condition for the patient with limited treatment options. From a surgical perspective, the treatment options for effective long-term survival are usually limited to heart transplantation, heart-lung transplantation or implantation of a destination mechanical circulatory support device. Assuming an advanced heart-failure patient is indeed deemed a candidate for transplantation, the patient is subject to shortages in donor organ availability and thus possible further decompensation and potential death while awaiting transplantation. Various extracorporeal and implantable ventricular-assist devices (VADs) may be able to provide temporary or long-term circulatory support for many end-stage heart-failure patients but mechanical circulatory support options for patients requiring long-term biventricular support remain limited. Implantation of a total artificial heart (TAH) currently represents one, if not the best, long-term surgical treatment option for patients requiring biventricular mechanical circulatory support as a bridge to transplant. The clinical applicability of available versions of positive displacement pumps is limited by their size and complications. Application of continuous-flow technology can help in solving some of these issues and is currently being applied in the research towards a new generation of smaller and more effective TAHs. In this review, we discuss the history of the TAH, its development and clinical application, implications for anaesthetic management, published outcomes and the future outlook for TAHs. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


News Article | October 31, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

MORRISVILLE, N.C., Oct. 31, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) announces the launch of CASE – an online, open-access, cardiovascular imaging case reports journal. The first issue is planned for early 2017, and submissions are now being accepted. CASE will be led by co-Editors-in-Chief, L. Leonardo Rodriguez, MD, FACC, FASE, from the Heart and Vascular Institute at the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, Ohio and Karen G. Zimmerman, BS, ACS, RDCS, RVT, FASE, from the Webber Heart Center, Munson Healthcare, Grand Traverse Region in Michigan.   "There is an increasing need for a forum to present teaching cases where imaging has played a fundamental diagnostic role," Dr. Rodriguez said. "CASE will be able to fill this need by taking advantage of new tools for the display of multimodality imaging techniques."   Karen Zimmerman added that "With the surge of echo requirements for the Heart Team such as in Structural Heart and in other procedures in the operating room, a journal like CASE sharing learning experiences by sonographers, cardiologists, anesthesiologists, and cardiothoracic surgeons will be an invaluable tool to guide the field."   ASE is proud to have assembled an international editorial board of experts in a wide range of cardiovascular care areas, and looks forward to working closely with them as we develop the journal. CASE will be designed to meet the needs of the medical community by providing timely, practical information on the challenges which face clinicians daily in delivering optimum patient care through efficient and effective diagnostic testing.   Allan L. Klein, MD, FACC, FASE, ASE President, who was one of the key players in making CASE a reality said, "Echocardiography is the key imaging modality to the many important management issues in cardiology. CASE has the potential to be the premier journal that showcases the power and value of echocardiography in clinical decision making. I am thrilled for the organization and our potential impact on patient care!"   CASE is an open access journal. There are open access fees for accepted papers of $800.00 for non-ASE members with a deeply discounted fee of $550.00 for ASE members. The CASE Guide for Authors can be found here.

Loading Heart and Vascular Institute collaborators
Loading Heart and Vascular Institute collaborators