Healthcare Innovation and Technology Laboratory

New York City, NY, United States

Healthcare Innovation and Technology Laboratory

New York City, NY, United States
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Hollin I.,IIT | Hollin I.,Healthcare Innovation and Technology Laboratory | Griffin M.,IIT | Griffin M.,Healthcare Innovation and Technology Laboratory | And 2 more authors.
Health Informatics Journal | Year: 2012

The most effective use of electronic medical records (EMRs) will result from wide-scale adoption and appropriate use of the technology-two factors that rely heavily on a system's usability. We conducted a qualitative and quantitative usability assessment of an EMR developed specifically for treating the HIV/AIDS patient population. The purpose of this study was to inform developers on how to prioritize resources for their impending software rebuild initiative and to evaluate a dual methodology consisting of both quantitative and qualitative components. The results indicated that the methodology was valid, although there were some variations recommended for future usability assessments of EMRs. The study also underscored the need to assess usability based on user feedback and to employ multiple methods to elicit information; this research revealed many insights into the software that contradicted initial assumptions and also found that asking questions in multiple ways yielded more complete feedback. © The Author(s) 2012.


Howell J.,Healthcare Innovation and Technology Laboratory | Howell J.,General Electric | Strong B.M.,Healthcare Innovation and Technology Laboratory | Strong B.M.,General Electric | And 9 more authors.
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society | Year: 2010

OBJECTIVES: To compare the correlation between the maximum 6 minutes of daily activity (M6min) and standard measures of functional capacity in older adults with heart failure (HF) with that in younger subjects and its prognostic utility. DESIGN: Prospective, cohort study. SETTING: Tertiary care, academic HF center. PARTICIPANTS: Sixty, ambulatory, adults, New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class I to III, stratified into young (50.9 ± 9.4) and older cohorts (76.8 ± 8.0). MEASUREMENTS: Correlation between M6min and measures of functional capacity (6-minute walk test; 6MWT) and peak oxygen consumption (VO2) according to cardiopulmonary exercise testing in a subset of subjects. Survival analysis was employed to evaluate the association between M6min and adverse events. RESULTS: Adherence to actigraphy was high (90%) and did not differ according to age. The correlation between M6min and 6MWT was higher in subjects aged 65 and older than in those younger than 65 (correlation coefficient (r=0.702, P<.001 vs r=0.490, P=.002). M6min was also significantly associated with peak VO2 (r=0.612, P=.006). During the study, 26 events occurred (2 deaths, 10 hospitalizations, 8 emergency department visits, and 6 intercurrent illnesses). The M6min was significantly associated with subsequent events (hazard ratio=2.728, 95% confidence interval=1.10-6.77, P=.03), independent of age, sex, ejection fraction, NYHA class, brain natriuretic peptide, and 6MWT. CONCLUSION: The high adherence to actigraphy and association with standard measures of functional capacity and independent association with subsequent morbid events suggest that it may be useful for monitoring older adults with HF. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2010, The American Geriatrics Society.


Timian A.,Healthcare Innovation and Technology Laboratory | Rupcic S.,Healthcare Innovation and Technology Laboratory | Kachnowski S.,Healthcare Innovation and Technology Laboratory | Kachnowski S.,Indian Institute of Technology Delhi | Luisi P.,Healthcare Innovation and Technology Laboratory
American Journal of Medical Quality | Year: 2013

With the growth of Facebook, public health researchers are exploring the platform's uses in health care. However, little research has examined the relationship between Facebook and traditional hospital quality measures. The authors conducted an exploratory quantitative analysis of hospitals' Facebook pages to assess whether Facebook "Likes" were associated with hospital quality and patient satisfaction. The 30-day mortality rates and patient recommendation rates were used to quantify hospital quality and patient satisfaction; these variables were correlated with Facebook data for 40 hospitals near New York, NY. The results showed that Facebook "Likes" have a strong negative association with 30-day mortality rates and are positively associated with patient recommendation. These exploratory findings suggest that the number of Facebook "Likes" for a hospital may serve as an indicator of hospital quality and patient satisfaction. These findings have implications for researchers and hospitals looking for a quick and widely available measure of these traditional indicators. © 2013 by the American College of Medical Quality.


Dhar M.,Healthcare Innovation and Technology Laboratory | Griffin M.,Healthcare Innovation and Technology Laboratory | Hollin I.,Healthcare Innovation and Technology Laboratory | Kachnowski S.,Healthcare Innovation and Technology Laboratory | Kachnowski S.,Indian Institute of Technology Delhi
Health Care Manager | Year: 2012

Innovation remains an understudied resource within health care. Furthermore, the goals of US health care reform make innovation vitally important, while the time and resource limitations characteristic of health care make new strategies for innovation both necessary and potentially highly meaningful. The purpose of this study was to examine strategies for innovation in various industries and draw lessons for improving innovation in health care. This qualitative study began with literature research that provided a framework for discussion and identified a recurrent challenge in innovation: balancing the freedom to be creative with the need for structured management of ideas. Researchers then identified leading innovative companies and conducted phone interviews with innovation officers and other experts about their strategies for addressing the major innovation challenge. This article breaks out innovation strategies into 6 categories (dedicated times, formal teams, outside ideas, idea-sharing platforms, company/job goals, and incentives) and evaluates them for levels of control, yield, and pervasiveness. Based on this analysis, recommendations are offered for improving innovation in health care, calling for employee time allocated to innovation, dedicated innovation teams, and the incorporation of outside ideas. Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Wilding M.J.,Healthcare Innovation and Technology Laboratory | Seegert L.,Healthcare Innovation and Technology Laboratory | Rupcic S.,Healthcare Innovation and Technology Laboratory | Griffin M.,Healthcare Innovation and Technology Laboratory | And 3 more authors.
Ageing Research Reviews | Year: 2013

Despite the importance of movement and activity indicators in predicting the risk of falls in older adults, collection and analysis of such data are limited. The dearth may result from recruitment challenges faced by fall-related studies that capture data on movement and activity in older adults. This article addresses recruitment and sampling methodology issues and draws attention to the gap in best practices left by previous literature. Authors conducted a systematic review of methods used to recruit elderly individuals for " activity-related fall studies" that assessed subjects' movement and mobility, and investigated incidence of real falls. The review highlighted effective recruitment strategies and identified challenges across several settings. Literature review findings were compared to recruitment challenges encountered in an activity-related fall study from 2011, focused on enrolling a target group of older adults with both high risk of falling and the requisite cognitive capacity to adhere to activity protocols. The analysis yielded several recommendations for improving recruitment of older adults for activity-related fall studies, including: recruiting from community-based settings; utilizing short-term activity protocols to promote involvement among institutionalized elderly; establishing eligibility criteria that may include those with lower cognitive functioning, mobility restrictions, and co-morbidities; employing direct-mail recruitment methods; and utilizing intermediaries to recruit institutionalized elderly. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Edwards A.,Healthcare Innovation and Technology Laboratory
Journal of healthcare information management : JHIM | Year: 2010

While the development of health information technology, particularly electronic health records (EHR), is a triumph for the advancement of healthcare, non-interoperable clinical data systems lead to fragmented communication and incomplete records. If interoperable HIT systems could be achieved integrated HIT could be leveraged to lessen medical errors, improve patient care and optimize epidemiological research. To understand the barriers to interoperability or health information exchange (HIE), we reviewed the literature on HIT and barriers to HIE. Our search yielded 492 articles, 25 meeting our inclusion criteria. In general, we found that the predominant barriers to HIE are need for standards, security concerns, economic loss to competitors, and federated systems. Research on interoperability is limited because most HIE programs are still in formative stages. More research is needed to fully understand interoperability of HIT, how to overcome the barriers to interoperability, and how to design HIT to better facilitate HIE.


Wei J.,Healthcare Innovation and Technology Laboratory | Wei J.,Indian Institute of Technology Delhi | Hollin I.,Healthcare Innovation and Technology Laboratory | Hollin I.,Indian Institute of Technology Delhi | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare | Year: 2011

We reviewed the literature on the use of text messaging for clinical and healthy behaviour interventions. Electronic databases were searched in December 2009 using keywords related to text messaging and health interventions. The final review included 24 articles. Of those, seven covered medication adherence, eight discussed clinical management and nine reported on health-related behaviour modification. Sixteen were randomized controlled trials (RCT), five were noncontrolled pre-post comparison studies and three were feasibility pilots not reporting a behavioural outcome. The frequency of messaging ranged from multiple messages daily to one message per month. Among the 16 RCTs, 10 reported significant improvement with interventions and six reported differences suggesting positive trends. Text messaging received good acceptance and showed early efficacy in most studies. However, the evidence base is compromised by methodological limitations and is not yet conclusive.


Tamrat T.,Healthcare Innovation and Technology Laboratory | Griffin M.,Healthcare Innovation and Technology Laboratory | Rupcic S.,Healthcare Innovation and Technology Laboratory | Kachnowski S.,Healthcare Innovation and Technology Laboratory | And 3 more authors.
2012 6th International Conference on Pervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare and Workshops, PervasiveHealth 2012 | Year: 2012

Falls are the leading cause of disability and injury-related deaths among older adults, resulting in over 1.6 million annual emergency hospitalizations in the United States. Fall detection devices often rely on dramatized falls when developing algorithms. This study used tri-axial accelerometers worn by older adult research subjects in order to (1) collect false positive data (2) capture potential fall events and (3) evaluate the usability of the device among this target population. Twelve older adults wore activity monitors while participating in structured and unstructured activities. The study collected data on 120 patient days, yielding 492.5 hours of monitored time. Actigraphy data of annotated activities were used to define parameters for refining the algorithm. No falls occurred during the study, but valuable false positive data were collected. The study also obtained information on the usability of the devices and revealed user perspectives on commercializing the final product. © 2012 ICST.


Tamrat T.,Healthcare Innovation and Technology Laboratory | Kachnowski S.,Indian Institute of Technology Delhi | Kachnowski S.,Healthcare Innovation and Technology Laboratory
Maternal and Child Health Journal | Year: 2012

Mobile health (mHealth) encompasses the use of mobile telecommunication and multimedia into increasingly mobile and wireless health care delivery systems and has the potential to improve tens of thousands of lives each year. The ubiquity and penetration of mobile phones presents the opportunity to leverage mHealth for maternal and newborn care, particularly in under-resourced health ecosystems. Moreover, the slow progress and funding constraints in attaining the Millennium Development Goals for child and maternal health encourage harnessing innovative measures, such as mHealth, to address these public health priorities. This literature review provides a schematic overview of the outcomes, barriers, and strategies of integrating mHealth to improve prenatal and neonatal health outcomes. Six electronic databases were methodically searched using predetermined search terms. Retrieved articles were then categorized according to themes identified in previous studies. A total of 34 articles and reports contributed to the findings with information about the use and limitations of mHealth for prenatal and neonatal healthcare access and delivery. Health systems have implemented mHealth programs to facilitate emergency medical responses, point-of-care support, health promotion and data collection. However, the policy infrastructure for funding, coordinating and guiding the sustainable adoption of prenatal and neonatal mHealth services remains under-developed. The integration of mobile health for prenatal and newborn health services has demonstrated positive outcomes, but the sustainability and scalability of operations requires further feedback from and evaluation of ongoing programs. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011.


PubMed | Healthcare Innovation and Technology Laboratory
Type: Evaluation Studies | Journal: Health informatics journal | Year: 2012

The most effective use of electronic medical records (EMRs) will result from wide-scale adoption and appropriate use of the technology-two factors that rely heavily on a systems usability. We conducted a qualitative and quantitative usability assessment of an EMR developed specifically for treating the HIV/AIDS patient population. The purpose of this study was to inform developers on how to prioritize resources for their impending software rebuild initiative and to evaluate a dual methodology consisting of both quantitative and qualitative components. The results indicated that the methodology was valid, although there were some variations recommended for future usability assessments of EMRs. The study also underscored the need to assess usability based on user feedback and to employ multiple methods to elicit information; this research revealed many insights into the software that contradicted initial assumptions and also found that asking questions in multiple ways yielded more complete feedback.

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