Health science North

Greater Sudbury, Canada

Health science North

Greater Sudbury, Canada
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Bhandari T.,Sunnybrook Health science Center | Socransky S.J.,Health science North
Critical Ultrasound Journal | Year: 2014

Background: Carotid ultrasound is performed solely in hospital ultrasound departments or outpatient labs, using both B- and Doppler modes. We hypothesize that B-mode without Doppler can be used to classify patients as having carotid stenosis (CS) above or below 50%. Our objective is to determine the frequency with which a CS >50% is found using Doppler when no such stenosis was visible using B-mode.Methods: This was a retrospective study of 100 patients referred to the stroke clinic and 100 patients referred for carotid endarterectomy (CEA). All patients had an elective carotid ultrasound done at Health Sciences North. The ultrasound reports were mixed together and blinded. Investigators determined if there was a CS of greater or less than 50% based on the carotid diagram. These results were compared to the degree of CS found on Doppler.Results: In the CEA group, there were 198 ultrasounds, with 153 showing a CS of >50%. Only one case of CS >50% was missed by B-mode. In the clinic group, 32 of 192 ultrasounds showed a CS of >50%. None were missed by B-mode. B-mode had a sensitivity and negative predictive value of 100% and a specificity of 65%.Conclusion: This study supports the theory that it may be possible to use B-mode ultrasound without Doppler to reliably determine if there is CS above or below 50%. Further research is required before carotid ultrasound using B-mode alone can be recommended. © 2014, Bhandari and Socransky; licensee Springer.


Vezina C.,CHU Sainte Justine | Infante-Rivard C.,McGill University | Lillicrap D.,Queen's University | Stain A.M.,Hospital for Sick Children | And 3 more authors.
Haemophilia | Year: 2014

The objective of this study was to evaluate the inhibitor development (ID) in previously untreated patients (PUPs) with severe haemophilia A (FVIII = 0.01 IU mL-1). All Canadian Haemophilia Treatment Centres completed a questionnaire on patients born between September 2005 and August 2010 and followed for up to 7 years. Eligible patients had at least 20 exposure days (ED) or had developed an inhibitor. The odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for risk factors to develop an inhibitor were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. A total of 99 haemophilia A PUPs were studied. Thirty-four (34%) developed an inhibitor (24/34 of high titre). Inhibitors developed in 25/63 (40%) patients with a high-risk mutation. ID was most frequent in Aboriginals (86%). Dose intensity (IU kg-1 day-1 X number of ED) at first exposure to factor VIII (FVIII) was associated with a crude OR increase of 1.10 (95% CI: 0.99-1.23) with each increase of 100 dose-intensity units. Haemarthrosis and intracranial bleeding as the indication for first exposure to FVIII concentrate were associated with a crude OR for ID of 7.63 (95% CI: 2.14-27.17) and 5.08 (95% CI: 1.11-23.31) respectively. ID according to FVIII concentrate used was: Advate ® 18/50 (36%), Kogenate FS® or Helixate FS® 15/36 (42%), Wilate® 0/11 and Xyntha® 1/2. In multivariate analysis, Aboriginal ethnicity (OR = 11.69; 95% CI: 1.11-122.86) and haemarthrosis (OR = 4.49; 95% CI: 1.08-18.61) were statistically significant. The cumulative incidence of ID in severe haemophilia A PUPs was 34% and varied according to ethnicity, type of bleeding at first ED, type of FVIII product and dose intensity at first exposure. © 2014 John Wiley and Sons Ltd.


Stachura M.R.,St Pauls Hospital | Socransky S.J.,Health science North | Wiss R.,Health science North | Betz M.,Sunnybrook Hospital
American Journal of Emergency Medicine | Year: 2014

Introduction Ultrasound guidance for central line placement in the subclavian vein (SCV) is more efficient and safer than landmark-based technique. The supraclavicular (SC) approach is an alternative to the infraclavicular (IC) approach, but the research is sparse. The objective was to determine which approach provides the best view. Methods This was a prospective anatomical survey of voluntary normovolemic patients. Four experienced emergency physicians and 1 resident scanned the right and left SCVs from SC and IC approaches. They assigned a score for the views obtained on a 5-point Likert scale. Results Ninety-eight patients were enrolled. Mean Likert scores for the 4 views were: right SC, 4.06 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.22); right IC, 3.07 (95% CI, 0.25); left SC, 3.82 (95% CI, 0.23); left IC, 3.12 (95% CI, 0.25). When combining data from right and left, the mean score for the SC view was significantly higher than the mean score for the IC view: 3.94 (95% CI, 0.16) vs 3.10 (95% CI, 0.18). The following ratings were obtained: right SC view was good or excellent in 71.5%; left SC view was good or excellent in 66.3%; right IC view was good or excellent in 37.8%; and left IC view was good or excellent in 38.8%. Conclusion The SC approach allows for a better view of the SCV on ultrasound than the IC approach. Future research should determine if this translates to a greater success rate when placing central lines in the SCV. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.


Loreto M.,Health science North | Kahn D.,Sunnybrook Research Institute | Glanc P.,University of Toronto | Glanc P.,Obstetrical Ultrasound Center at Sunnybrook
Journal of the American College of Radiology | Year: 2014

Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the attitudes and perceptions of staff radiologists regarding the incorporation of a nonanonymous peer review system at an academic hospital. Methods A questionnaire gauging knowledge of, attitudes toward, and perceptions regarding peer review was distributed to all staff radiologists at a large academic hospital. The survey was distributed before the implementation of a nonanonymous peer review system. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Responses were cross-tabulated according to subspecialty and number of years in practice. Results The majority of respondents agreed that peer review is important for improving patient care (31 of 36 [86%]) and professional development (29 of 36 [81%]), but the vast majority (33 of 36 [92%]) believed that peer review should be anonymous. Twenty-six of 36 respondents (72%) believed that peer review will not be safe from malpractice issues, 24 of 36 (67%) agreed that it has the potential to damage interpersonal relationships within the department, and 15 of 36 (42%) believed that it may influence their job security or rankings within the department. Significant differences were identified between radiologists with more and fewer years of practice experience. Conclusions The incorporation of a nonanonymous peer review system generates anxiety and uncertainty within a radiology department. The investigation of physicians' attitudes toward and perceptions about peer review is important for understanding the potential impact not only on patient care but also on radiologists' relationships and psychology in the workplace. © 2014 American College of Radiology.


Fortin A.J.,Health science North | Fortin A.J.,University of Western Ontario | Evans H.B.,University of Western Ontario | Chu M.W.A.,University of Western Ontario
Canadian Journal of Plastic Surgery | Year: 2012

BACKGROUND: Microsurgical breast reconstruction is a popular choice in breast reconstruction. Recipient vessel use for these autologous tissue reconstructions has shifted from the thoracodorsal to the internal mammary vessels. Coronary artery bypass (CAB) surgery remains the optimal revascularization strategy in patients with significant, diffuse coronary artery disease. The conduits of choice for coronary revascularization are the internal mammary arteries (IMA) because of their superior long-term graft patency rate and improved patient survival. OBJECTIVE: To review the cardiac risk factors in the breast reconstruction population, and to report the incidence of postoperative cardiac events at the London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario. The authors present the index cases illustrating cardiac complications following the use of internal mammary vessels. METHOD: A retrospective, single-centre, cumulative audit of breast reconstruction practice from 2005 to 2009 was conducted. A total of 81 patients undergoing autologous breast reconstruction were reviewed. Two women were noted to have experienced postoperative myocardial infarction requiring intervention. Both were noted to have triple-vessel disease, an indication for CAB; however, during the breast reconstruction, their IMAs had been utilized. As a result, both women subsequently underwent triple-vesssel percutaneous intervention, with one woman later requiring CAB without IMA because of recurrent ischemia. CONCLUSION: While there is limited overlap with the breast reconstruction and cardiac disease population, there can be significant cardiac health implications in the postoperative status (both short and long term) of women undergoing autologous breast reconstruction using the IMAs as recipient vessels. © 2012 Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons. All rights reserved.


Atoui R.,Health science North | Chiu R.C.J.,McGill University
Expert Opinion on Biological Therapy | Year: 2012

Stem cell transplantation is a promising approach for improving cardiac function after severe myocardial damage for which use of autologous cells have been preferred to avoid immune rejection. Recently, however, rodent as well as human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been reported to be uniquely immune tolerant, both in in vitro as well as in vivo transplant models. In this editorial, we briefly summarize the current understanding of the underlying immunologic mechanisms, which can facilitate the use of such cells as "Universal Donor Cells." © 2012 Informa UK, Ltd.


Introduction: There are conflicting data regarding the role of serum ferritin (SF) as surrogate parameter for iron overload as an independent prognostic factor for outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) biomagnetic liver susceptometry, a noninvasive measurement of iron overload, allows measurement of the interference of an exteriorly applied small but highly constant magnetic field by the paramagnetic liver storage iron. By measuring the true iron load of patients through SQUID, we wanted to assess the effect of iron overload on patients undergoing SCT. Methods: We conducted a single-center retrospective analysis (1994–2010), comparing the effect of SF and liver iron content measured by SQUID shortly before transplantation on overall survival (OS), event-free survival (EFS), and transplant-related mortality (TRM) in 142 patients (median age 54.5 yr, range 5.6–75 yr) undergoing SCT (80% reduced intensity regimen). Patients were subdivided into five groups: myelodysplastic syndrome, de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML), secondary AML, primary myelofibrosis, and others. Results: Correlation between SF and SQUID was significant (r = 0.6; P < 0.001; log function). The chance of infection was increased 2.4-fold (95% CI 1.22–4.71) when SQUID values ranged ≥1000 μg Fe/g liver (P = 0.012). We found similar results for SF >1000 ng/mL (P = 0.003). A significant association between SQUID and fungal infection was also seen (P = 0.004). For patients with SQUID ≥1000, the risk of proven fungal infection was increased 3.08-fold (95% CI 1.43–6.63). A similar association between SF >1000 and fungal infection was shown (P = 0.01). In univariate analysis, age was a prognostic factor for TRM (P = 0.034, HR 1.04, CI 1.00–1.08). SF ≥1000 was associated with OS (P = 0.033, HR 2.09, CI 1.06–4.11) and EFS (P = 0.016, HR 2.15, 95% CI 1.15–4.10). In multivariate analysis on EFS, only age and SF >1000 remained as independent factors (HR 1.027, P = 0.040, 95% CI 1.001–1.054 and HR 2.058, P = 0.034, 95% CI 1.056–4.008, respectively). The multivariate analysis on TRM left age and SQUID values ≥1000 in the final model (HR 1.045, P = 0.041, 95% CI 1.002–1.090 and HR 2.110, P = 0.103, 95% CI 0.859–5.183, respectively). Conclusion: Our data confirmed that SF ≥1000 increases the risk of infection, moreover fungal infection in transplant recipients. As SQUID values correlate well with SF, we could show that SF is indeed a good surrogate parameter for iron overload when measured shortly before SCT. Prospective trials are needed to investigate the effect of iron chelation before or during SCT on transplant outcome. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd


There are conflicting data regarding the role of serum ferritin (SF) as surrogate parameter for iron overload as an independent prognostic factor for outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) biomagnetic liver susceptometry, a noninvasive measurement of iron overload, allows measurement of the interference of an exteriorly applied small but highly constant magnetic field by the paramagnetic liver storage iron. By measuring the true iron load of patients through SQUID, we wanted to assess the effect of iron overload on patients undergoing SCT.We conducted a single-center retrospective analysis (1994-2010), comparing the effect of SF and liver iron content measured by SQUID shortly before transplantation on overall survival (OS), event-free survival (EFS), and transplant-related mortality (TRM) in 142 patients (median age 54.5 yr, range 5.6-75 yr) undergoing SCT (80% reduced intensity regimen). Patients were subdivided into five groups: myelodysplastic syndrome, de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML), secondary AML, primary myelofibrosis, and others.Correlation between SF and SQUID was significant (r = 0.6; P < 0.001; log function). The chance of infection was increased 2.4-fold (95% CI 1.22-4.71) when SQUID values ranged 1000 g Fe/g liver (P = 0.012). We found similar results for SF >1000 ng/mL (P = 0.003). A significant association between SQUID and fungal infection was also seen (P = 0.004). For patients with SQUID 1000, the risk of proven fungal infection was increased 3.08-fold (95% CI 1.43-6.63). A similar association between SF >1000 and fungal infection was shown (P = 0.01). In univariate analysis, age was a prognostic factor for TRM (P = 0.034, HR 1.04, CI 1.00-1.08). SF 1000 was associated with OS (P = 0.033, HR 2.09, CI 1.06-4.11) and EFS (P = 0.016, HR 2.15, 95% CI 1.15-4.10). In multivariate analysis on EFS, only age and SF >1000 remained as independent factors (HR 1.027, P = 0.040, 95% CI 1.001-1.054 and HR 2.058, P = 0.034, 95% CI 1.056-4.008, respectively). The multivariate analysis on TRM left age and SQUID values 1000 in the final model (HR 1.045, P = 0.041, 95% CI 1.002-1.090 and HR 2.110, P = 0.103, 95% CI 0.859-5.183, respectively).Our data confirmed that SF 1000 increases the risk of infection, moreover fungal infection in transplant recipients. As SQUID values correlate well with SF, we could show that SF is indeed a good surrogate parameter for iron overload when measured shortly before SCT. Prospective trials are needed to investigate the effect of iron chelation before or during SCT on transplant outcome.


Saidi K.,Health science North
Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine | Year: 2012

The treatment of benign and malignant primary bone tumors has progressed over time from relatively simple practice to complex resection and reconstruction techniques. Recently, computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery (CAOS) has been used to assist surgeons to enhance surgical precision in order to achieve these goals. Initially, software developed for CT-based spinal applications was used to perform simple intraoperative point localization. With advances in technique and software design, oncology surgeons have now performed joint sparing complex multiplanar osteotomies using combined CT and MRI image data with precision and accuracy. The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the clinical progress to date, the different types of navigation available, methods for error management, and limitations of CAOS in the treatment of pediatric benign and malignant primary bone tumors. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012.


Faiella W.,Health science North | Atoui R.,Health science North
Stem Cells International | Year: 2016

Stem cell transplantation is a potential therapeutic option to regenerate damaged myocardium and restore function after infarct. Current research is focused on the use of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) due to their unique immunomodulatory characteristics and ability to be harvested from young and healthy donors. Both animal and human studies support the immunoprivileged state of MSCs and even demonstrate improvements in cardiac function after transplantation. This research continues to be a topic of interest, as advances will ultimately enable the clinical use of these universal cells for therapy after a myocardial infarction. Updated in vitro, in vivo, and clinical trial studies are discussed in detail in the following review. © 2016 Whitney Faiella and Rony Atoui.

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