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PubMed | Health Promotion Evaluation Unit and Telethon Institute for Child Health Research
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Psychological assessment | Year: 2014

Eating and body image disturbances in children are typically assessed using the Childrens Eating Disorder Examination (ChEDE); however, support for the reliability and validity of scores on this measure is mixed. Furthermore, previous studies suggest that scores obtained from a simplified 8-item version of the ChEDE may be more reliable and useful for research purposes than scores obtained from the full scale. The present study sought to psychometrically evaluate the reliability and factor structure of this brief 8-item scale. Two separate community-based samples of 6- to 11-year-olds (N = 535) were administered the ChEDE as part of a broader assessment battery. The brief 8-item model provided a good fit to the data, as determined by confirmatory factor analysis. Additionally, scores obtained from the 8-item scale, as well as a global ChEDE score, provided reliable measures of a childs eating disorder symptoms, and were superior to the original 4 subscales in both healthy-weight and overweight/obese samples. The brief 8-item scale may therefore be used by researchers who want a reliable and valid index of global eating disorder psychopathology without doing a full interview.


Pescud M.,Health Promotion Evaluation Unit | Pescud M.,Australian National University | Teal R.,Health Promotion Evaluation Unit | Shilton T.,National Heart Foundation WA | And 4 more authors.
BMC Public Health | Year: 2015

Background: The evidence surrounding the value of workplace health promotion in positively influencing employees' health and wellbeing via changes to their health behaviours is growing. The aim of the study was to explore employers' views on the promotion of workplace health and wellbeing and the factors affecting these views. Methods: Using a qualitative phenomenological approach, 10 focus groups were conducted with employers selected from a range of industries and geographical locations within Western Australia. The total sample size was 79. Results: Three factors were identified: employers' conceptualization of workplace health and wellbeing; employers' descriptions of (un)healthy workers and perceptions surrounding the importance of healthy workers; and employers' beliefs around the role the workplace should play in influencing health. Conclusions: Progress may be viable in promoting health and wellbeing if a multifaceted approach is employed taking into account the complex factors influencing employers' views. This could include an education campaign providing information about what constitutes health and wellbeing beyond the scope of occupational health and safety paradigms along with information on the benefits of workplace health and wellbeing aligned with perceptions relating to healthy and unhealthy workers. © 2015 Pescud et al.


Pescud M.,Australian National University | Teal R.,Health Promotion Evaluation Unit | Shilton T.,National Heart Foundation WA | Slevin T.,Cancer Council WA | And 3 more authors.
BMC Public Health | Year: 2015

Background: The evidence surrounding the value of workplace health promotion in positively influencing employees' health and wellbeing via changes to their health behaviours is growing. The aim of the study was to explore employers' views on the promotion of workplace health and wellbeing and the factors affecting these views. Methods: Using a qualitative phenomenological approach, 10 focus groups were conducted with employers selected from a range of industries and geographical locations within Western Australia. The total sample size was 79. Results: Three factors were identified: employers' conceptualization of workplace health and wellbeing; employers' descriptions of (un)healthy workers and perceptions surrounding the importance of healthy workers; and employers' beliefs around the role the workplace should play in influencing health. Conclusions: Progress may be viable in promoting health and wellbeing if a multifaceted approach is employed taking into account the complex factors influencing employers' views. This could include an education campaign providing information about what constitutes health and wellbeing beyond the scope of occupational health and safety paradigms along with information on the benefits of workplace health and wellbeing aligned with perceptions relating to healthy and unhealthy workers. © 2015 Pescud et al.

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