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Froehlich-Grobe K.,University of Texas at Dallas | Shropshire W.C.,University of Texas at Dallas | Zimmerman H.,Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Bureau | Van Brunt J.,Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Bureau | Betts A.,University of Texas at Dallas
Journal of Community Health | Year: 2016

Women with disabilities have lower screening rates for breast and cervical cancer with some evidence suggesting that people with disabilities experience higher cancer mortality and may receive a different course of treatment. This study examined whether women with and without disabilities using Montana Cancer Control Program (MCCP) differ in use of breast (BCS) and cervical (CCS) screening services, receipt of and follow up for inconclusive or abnormal results, and compliance with BCS and CCS US Preventive Services Task Force recommendations. Study participants were women eligible for MCCP screening services between November 2012 and October 2014, with eligibility based on insurance status (underinsured/no insurance), income requirements (<200 % poverty based on income/household size), and age. The data derive from participant self-report (demographic, disability, and health history including previous mammogram or Papanicolaou test) and MCCP records of screening tests (clinical breast exam, mammogram, or Pap test), results, and follow up visits. About 11.5 % of MCCP participants reported having a disability. MCCP recipients with a disability were significantly older, more likely to be non-Hispanic White, and more likely to have poor health profiles. Disability status did not affect use of MCCP screening services, screening outcome, or follow up for inconclusive or abnormal results. However, women with disability had significantly lower BCS and CCS compliance (based on US Preventive Task Force guidelines) than women without disability, which persisted in adjusted analyses controlling for other significant factors. The MCCP is reaching un/underinsured Montana women with disabilities. While disability status in this sample was not related to use of MCCP services or screening outcome, MCCP recipients with disabilities have significantly lower BCS and CCS compliance. Efforts to increase compliance for un/underinsured Montana women with a disability are warranted. © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Source


Butcher M.K.,Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Bureau | Vanderwood K.K.,Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Bureau | Hall T.O.,Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Bureau | Gohdes D.,Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Bureau | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Public Health Management and Practice | Year: 2011

Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the capacity of diabetes self-management education (DSME) programs in urban and rural counties to provide services to patients with diagnosed diabetes, lifestyle services to persons at high risk for developing diabetes, and to assess the potential barriers to providing diabetes prevention services. Methods: In 2009, the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services conducted an Internet-based survey of all DSME programs in Montana. Results: Thirty of the 39 (77%) DSME programs completed the survey. Seventy-seven percent of the urban programs and 50% of the rural programs reported a capacity to provide DSME to additional patients with diagnosed diabetes. More than 70% of the urban and the rural programs currently provide lifestyle services to patients with abnormal glucose tolerance but without diabetes. Eighty-four percent of the urban programs and 60% of the rural programs reported a capacity to provide lifestyle services to additional persons at high risk for diabetes. Eighty-five percent of the urban programs and 58% of the rural programs have already implemented or intend to implement a lifestyle intervention service consistent with the Diabetes Prevention Program. Overall, the most frequently reported barriers to implementing a diabetes prevention services were lack of reimbursement (80%) and the lack of staff to provide the service (60%). Conclusion: Urban and rural DSME programs in Montana have the capacity to implement both DSME for patients with diagnosed diabetes and diabetes prevention lifestyle services to additional people at high risk for diabetes. Reimbursement for diabetes prevention services is critical to ensure program development and implementation. Copyright © 2011 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Source

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