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Protecting babies and children against dangerous — sometimes fatal — diseases is a core mission of public health. Everyday, in health departments across the nation, someone is working on maintaining and improving childhood vaccination rates and keeping diseases like measles and mumps from regaining a foothold in the U.S. Fortunately for us, public health has been so successful that it’s easy to forget what it was like just a few decades ago when measles was a common childhood illness. (Though here’s a reminder.) But sustaining vaccination rates that provide population-wide protection against disease is complicated work — and it’s complicated even more by growing hesitancy among some parents to vaccinate their children. Confronting that challenge in the age of the Internet is a sizeable task for public health, especially with research showing that simply relying on evidence-based talking points won’t always work and, in some cases, can even be counterproductive. That’s why finding an effective way to break through today’s clutter of information (and misinformation) to reach concerned parents is so important to sustaining current immunization rates. In Washington state, where school entry vaccination exemptions had doubled over a decade and were three times higher than the national average, researchers have developed a promising way to do just that. Known as the Immunity Community, the intervention mobilizes vaccine-supportive parents and trains them to use positive dialogue to engage their peers, both in person and online, in discussions about vaccines. An evaluation of the three-year intervention, published last month in Health Promotion Practice, is very encouraging: parents who described themselves as “vaccine hesitant” fell from 23 percent to 14 percent, while parental concerns about their peers’ decisions not to vaccinate rose from 81 percent to 89 percent. Clarissa Hsu, who helped design the intervention and co-authored the recent study, told me the key to Immunity Community was building off the positive experiences of parent vaccine advocates, rather than highlighting the differences between parents. “We wanted to promote what’s already happening, which is that most parents do vaccinate,” said Hsu, who’s with the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute’s Center for Community Health and Evaluation. “It wasn’t about attacking people’s beliefs, but about communicating positive messages about vaccines. …It allowed people to hear these messages without it being a direct confrontation.” Vax Northwest, a public-private partnership that convened in 2008 to address vaccine hesitancy in Washington, developed the Immunity Community after early research identified parental social groups as promising intervention points for changing vaccine attitudes. Mackenzie Melton, immunization coordinator at WithinReach Washington, an organizational member of Vax Northwest, said those early focus groups revealed that while parents typically ranked health care providers as the most trusted source of vaccine information, their social networks of friends and family came second. As such, Immunity Community was developed to leverage the trust that parents already have within their social networks to create positive consensus around vaccines. “The real thrust of the whole campaign was how to be immunization positive without being negative about people who don’t immunize,” Todd Faubion, immunization manager at WithinReach, told me. “We wanted (parent advocates) to talk about themselves — it was about them and how they can talk positively about immunizations.” Immunity Community organizers worked with staff at schools, preschools and child care centers to recruit and train interested parents to become advocates in their communities. Recruits were then educated on basic vaccine science and trained on how to communicate effectively and respectfully with peers, organize immunization-positive activities, and engage fellow parents on social media. “The emphasis was on the fact that (parent advocates) were trusted resources, not immunization experts,” Melton told me. “We wanted them to talk from the heart about why they thought (vaccines) were important for their families and communities. We didn’t want to dictate what (advocates) did — we wanted them to have the tools to have these conversations organically.” Immunity Community was implemented in two communities: a suburban school district outside a major metro area and a small city in a rural county. In both, parent advocates engaged in a variety of immunization-positive activities, such as social media advocacy, hosting school events, passing out immunization materials and having one-on-one conversations with other parents. The evaluation in Health Promotion Practice, based on hundreds of survey responses from parents before and after the intervention, found that fewer parents thought children receive vaccines at too young an age, more parents were confident that vaccinating was a good idea, and more were aware of vaccination rates at their child’s school or day care. Also post-intervention, more parents agreed that vaccine ingredients were safe and more were concerned about fellow parents deciding not to vaccinate. Overall, the number of parents who identified as “vaccine hesitant” declined from 23 percent before the intervention to 14 percent after. In addition to changes in attitude, the Immunity Community also impacted statewide policy. Hsu reported that as a direct result of the intervention, officials enhanced recommendations guiding how cooperative preschools track immunization rates and disease outbreaks among their students. Hsu called the change, which affects more than 10,000 families, “a big win for public health.” Of course, as with most studies, this one has its limitations. Hsu noted that because there was no control group with which to compare the Immunity Community effect, researchers can’t say whether the changes in parental attitudes were a direct result of the intervention. More research is needed to determine the long-term impact of Immunity Community on immunization behaviors, she told me. But one of the most promising results of the study, Hsu told me, is that “this is doable.” In other words, parents can be trained to be advocates for vaccines and their peers seem receptive to their vaccine-positive messaging approach. “It created a new set of positive conversations around vaccines,” Hsu said. “I certainly think (Immunity Community) is a strategy that’s ready for people to try to implement elsewhere.” Study co-author Faubion said while the formal evaluation process of Immunity Community is over, its advocates “remain strong and willing to step in when there’s an opportunity” to have a positive conversation about vaccines. Today, he said, Immunity Community is a publicly available resource for anyone in Washington state and beyond. To access its resources and assistance, contact Faubion and Melton at Vax Northwest. “The whole idea was to create something innovative for public health officials,” Hsu said. “It’s critical that kids are vaccinated and that communities at-large understand herd immunity and how their decisions impact others.” For a full copy of the Immunity Community study, visit Health Promotion Practice. Kim Krisberg is a freelance public health writer living in Austin, Texas, and has been writing about public health for 15 years. Follow me on Twitter — @kkrisberg.


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Friday, May 5, 2017, the Directors of Health Promotion & Education (DHPE) completes its tour of all five regions of the Chi Eta Phi Sorority at the 64th Annual Southwest Regional Conference, South Point Casino and Hotel, 9777 Las Vegas Blvd South, Las Vegas, NV. “With the average diagnosis timeframe being 4 to 6 years, lupus patients need more health care providers to know and recognize the signs and symptoms of lupus to decrease the diagnosis timeframe and help lupus patients have better health outcomes,” said DHPE Lupus Education and Awareness for Patients, Professionals and Providers (LEAP) Program Director Thometta Cozart, MS, MPH, CHES, CPH. Lupus is a chronic, autoimmune disease with no cure that can damage any part of the body, including skin, joints and organs. Current research shows that at least 1.5 million Americans have lupus, per the Lupus Foundation of America. Women of color are two to three times more likely to develop lupus than Caucasians. “Lupus is a difficult disease to diagnosis and this partnership with the DHPE LEAP will ensure our professional nurse membership is better prepared to address lupus health disparities, such as late diagnosis among women of color that may lead to organ failure and premature death,” said Chi Eta Phi National Vice President Priscilla J. Murphy LPCMH, MEd, BSN, RN, and owner of Nylex Educational & Counseling Services, Inc. According to the American College of Rheumatology, lupus patients see at least three providers, including nurses, before receiving an accurate lupus diagnosis. Lupus educational sessions featuring rheumatologists, lupus researchers and lupus patients will be coordinated by DHPE LEAP and hosted at the regional meetings of Chi Eta Phi Sorority, Inc. to educate more nurses on the signs and symptoms of lupus for more accurate diagnosis. DHPE’s Lupus Education and Awareness for Patients, Professionals and Providers [LEAP] Program Session is scheduled for Friday, May 5, 2017. It will be opened by Thometta Cozart, MS, MPH, CHES, CPH, LEAP Program Director and features: Irene Blanco, MD, MS, Associate Dean of Diversity Enhancement, Rheumatology Fellowship Program Director, Einstein College of Medicine and Lupus Patient Advocate Hetlena Johnson, Chief Volunteer Officer of South Carolina Community Partner, an affiliate of the Lupus Foundation of America, Inc. The session will educate on the signs and symptoms of lupus; the descriptive epidemiological assessment of the disease; case studies and the patient-provider perspective. Established in October 16, 1932, Chi Eta Phi has more than 8,000 sorority members in graduate and undergraduate chapters grouped into five regions based on geographic areas. The chapters are located throughout the United States, District of Columbia, St. Thomas U.S. Virgin Island and Liberia, West Africa. The Sorority has programs focusing on health promotion/disease prevention, leadership development, mentoring, recruitment and retention and scholarships. The partnership is part of the DHPE LEAP Program, which is funded by the national Office of Minority Health, US Department of Health and Human Services. The program targets women of color who are at an increased risk for lupus, as well as educating public health professionals and primary care providers of the signs and symptoms of lupus. The LEAP Program also has national partnerships with the National Medical Association and the National Black Nurses Association. For more program information contact LEAP Project Director Thometta Cozart at tcozart@dhpe.org and visit the program website at http://www.bit.ly/dhpelupus. The Directors of Health Promotion and Education (DHPE) is a national non-profit organization whose mission is to build on principles and practices of health promotion and education to strengthen public health capacity in policy and systems change, thereby improving the health of all and achieving health equity. DHPE, founded in 1946, is legally known as the Association of State and Territorial Directors of Health Promotion and Public Health Education (ASTDHPPHE). DHPE is located at 1030 15th Street NW, #275, Washington, DC 20005. For more information, visit http://www.dhpe.org.


With an upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare, Nyree L. Parker, RN/Clinical Nurse Specialist, Dip. Health Science, BN, Graduate Certificate of Health Education, Graduate Certificate Health Promotion, Graduate Diploma Critical Care/Emergency, MN, Master Degree in Disaster Health, joins the prestigious ranks of the International Nurses Association. She is a Registered Nurse with twenty-four years of experience in her field and extensive expertise in all facets of nursing, including emergency care and Disaster Health. Nyree is currently serving patients as Clinical Nurse Specialist in the Emergency Department and Emergency Management and BCP Consultant in the Facilities Management Department at Peninsula Health in Victoria, Australia. This involves policy and procedure/plan writings for i.e. mass casualties incidents, CBR decontamination processes, pandemics, heatwaves, bushfires and severe weather impacting on the public hospital organisation. Furthermore, she works as Assistance in Care Emergency Volunteer Coordinator in the Emergency Departments at Peninsula Health Frankston Hospital in Frankston, Victoria, Australia. Nyree acquired her graduate diploma in applied sciences in 1991 at Monash University, where she also received her bachelor degree of nursing in 1992. She also obtained a diploma of critical care nursing majoring in Emergency care (1997), a master degree of nursing (2001), and a Master Degree in emergency Disaster Health (2013) at Monash University. In 1998, Nyree earned a postgraduate certificate in health promotion from Deakin University. She is a Clinical Nurse Specialist and was a Trauma Nursing Core Course Instructor as well as a member of the Australian College of Emergency Nursing, the Victoria Hospital Management Forum, the Royal College of Nursing Australia, the Australian Nurses Federation, and an active member of the Nursing Section of the World Association of Disaster Emergency Medicine. Furthermore, she was honoured with the Dux of Group Award in 2009 and was a volunteers with St. John’s Ambulance. Nyree credits her success to being a third generation nurse in her family. She also has acted as a Clinical Instructor of Emergency Management and Critical Care at Monash University. Nyree is aiming to commence her PhD in Disaster Health looking at topics of climate change implications on emergency nurses and the role of an Emergency Management Consultant in the hospital environment. In her spare time, Nyree enjoys reading the Great Hospital Emergency Disaster Relief Journal and the Emergency Medicine News Journal. She also dedicates to dog walking and antique shopping and driving her 1948 Morris car! Learn more about Nyree here: http://inanurse.org/network/index.php?do=/4125803/info/ and read her upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare.


Oct. 25, 2016 -- Dr. Mary T. Bassett, Commissioner of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, was awarded the Frank A. Calderone Prize by the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health at a ceremony held this morning at the Paley Center for Media in Midtown. The Calderone Prize, the most prestigious award in public health, is awarded every two years to an individual who has made a transformational contribution in the field, with selection by an international committee of public health leaders. "Commissioner Bassett has been focused on health equity at every stage of an exceptional public health career," said Dean Linda P. Fried, who presented the Calderone Award to Dr. Bassett. "Her recognition of the role of race as a driver of health disparities, her record of publication on excess disease burden among people of color, and her ability to synthesize years of experience in the developing world with her role in New York City elevate her to the pantheon of prior Calderone winners." "It is an honor to be selected as the 12th Calderone Prize recipient and join some of the finest women and men who have made public health a passion and mission in this country and beyond," said Commissioner Bassett. "I loved being a doctor who saw individual patients, but I knew that I could effect change on a much larger scale if I entered the public health field to tackle racism and other structural factors that lead to poor health outcomes." At the award ceremony, Health Commissioner Bassett delivered an original lecture entitled, "Public Health Meets the Problem of the Color Line," where she underscored the importance of explicitly naming racism in advancing health equity work. In her more than 30 years of experience in government, hospitals, and non-profits, Health Commissioner Bassett has made a significant impact on public health both locally and around the world. As an activist and a scholar, Bassett bridged the divide between academic and applied public health, on disease prevention at Harlem Hospital and at the Department of Community Medicine at the University of Zimbabwe, and in support of health equity with the Rockefeller Foundation in South Africa. At the African Health Initiative and the domestic Child Abuse Prevention Program at the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, she worked to strengthen health systems in Ghana, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Zambia. As Deputy Commissioner of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention at the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Bassett spearheaded campaigns to ban smoking in public places, eliminate trans fats in restaurants and require chain restaurants to post calorie information -- initiatives that have become global models, adopted widely in cities in other countries. Commissioner Bassett has worked to address obesity and diabetes and cardiovascular disease, which threaten the health of the most vulnerable in the city. Responding to the Black Lives Matter movement, she wrote in a 2015 New England Journal of Medicine article that health professionals must do more to end racial disparities and discrimination. Born and raised in New York City, Health Commissioner Bassett earned her bachelor's degree in History and Science from Harvard University, master's degree in Public Health from University of Washington in Seattle, and her medical degree from Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons. The Calderone Prize is named for Frank A. Calderone, who had a distinguished career in public health, leading him from the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to important posts at the World Health Organization. Instrumental in shaping the WHO's policies and structure, he also raised support for its continued operation. In 1986, the Calderone family established this prize to mark Frank Calderone's lifelong commitment and recognize exceptional public health leaders. The Calderone Prize has been previously awarded to Peter Piot, MD, former Executive Director, UNAIDS, and Under Secretary-General, United Nations; Mary Robinson, MA, former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights and former President of Ireland; and Nafis Sadik, MD, Special Advisor to the Secretary-General of the UN and former Executive Director, United Nations Population Fund, among other public health luminaries. Founded in 1922, Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health pursues an agenda of research, education, and service to address the critical and complex public health issues affecting New Yorkers, the nation and the world. The Mailman School is the third largest recipient of NIH grants among schools of public health. Its over 450 multi-disciplinary faculty members work in more than 100 countries around the world, addressing such issues as preventing infectious and chronic diseases, environmental health, maternal and child health, health policy, climate change & health, and public health preparedness. It is a leader in public health education with over 1,300 graduate students from more than 40 nations pursuing a variety of master's and doctoral degree programs. The Mailman School is also home to numerous world-renowned research centers including ICAP (formerly the International Center for AIDS Care and Treatment Programs) and the Center for Infection and Immunity. For more information, please visit http://www. .


News Article | December 1, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

Everyone Encouraged to Get Tested for HIV ATLANTA, GA--(Marketwired - Dec 1, 2016) -  In recognition of World AIDS Day on December 1, GeoVax Labs, Inc. ( : GOVX), a biotechnology company specializing in developing human vaccines, encourages everyone to get tested for HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Around the world, about 35 million people are living with HIV. In the United States, about 50,000 people become infected with HIV every year. World AIDS Day is a global initiative to raise awareness, fight prejudice, and improve education about HIV and AIDS. In the United States, about 1 in 5 people who have HIV don't know they are infected, and the only way to know one's infection status is to be tested. In fact, the U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion recommends that everyone aged 15 to 65 should be tested at least once. To find an HIV testing location near you, use the online locator at https://locator.aids.gov. Getting tested is important for both the individual and for world health. For the individual, early detection will allow sooner intervention with anti-retroviral medication and prevention of the infection progressing to AIDS, thus allowing a near-normal life. But just as importantly, drug treatment means the infected individual will be much less likely to spread HIV to others. GeoVax is committed to an AIDS-free generation through vaccine development. Our HIV vaccine candidate is currently progressing through human clinical trials conducted by the HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN) with support from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). To learn more about our work to fight HIV, visit www.geovax.com. GeoVax Labs, Inc., is a clinical-stage biotechnology company developing human vaccines against infectious diseases using its Modified Vaccinia Ankara-Virus Like Particle (MVA-VLP) vaccine platform. The Company's development programs are focused on vaccines against HIV, Zika Virus, hemorrhagic fever viruses (Ebola, Sudan, Marburg, and Lassa) and malaria. GeoVax also is evaluating the use of its MVA-VLP platform in cancer immunotherapy, and for therapeutic use in chronic Hepatitis B infections. GeoVax's vaccine platform supports in vivo production of non-infectious VLPs from the cells of the very person receiving the vaccine, mimicking a natural infection, stimulating both the humoral and cellular arms of the immune system to recognize, prevent, and control the target infection. For more information, visit www.geovax.com.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Each January, athletic trainers who are part of the Eastern Athletic Trainer’s Association come together to celebrate learning and the profession of athletic training at the annual EATA Conference. This year, the 69th installment of the conference took place January 6-9, 2017 at the Loews Hotel in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. At the awards ceremony this year, John Furtado received the 2017 Cramer Award. This award was developed by Cramer Products in 1966 to provide a method for the Eastern Athletic Trainers' Association to honor those members who have provided excellent leadership in serving the EATA and in doing so, advanced the profession of Athletic Training. The plaque is inscribed “To the Athletic Trainer who, through leadership and excellence, has contributed most significantly to the advancement of the Athletic Training profession.” In order to receive the award, the recipient must meet the following criteria: 1. Current member, in good standing, of the National Athletic Trainers Association. 2. Currently BOC Certified or Certified-Retired Status and in good standing. 3. Ten years EATA membership. 4. Provided service to EATA on a committee, as a committee chair or held an EATA office for a minimum of 3 years 5. Has served as a speaker or presenter at an annual EATA meeting. 6. Demonstrates a history of special organizational efforts on behalf of the EATA. 7. Has greatly enhanced the profession of athletic training in District I or II, and/ or has served the National Athletic Trainers’ Association or any of its entities. Allan Parsells, Public Relations Chairman for the ATSNJ, sat down with Mr. Furtado to talk about his most recent award and his long career as an athletic trainer. AP: Mr. Furtado, thank you for taking the time to speak with me and congratulations on receiving the Cramer award from the EATA. How did you first get into Athletic Training? JF: I have a Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy from Northeastern University and Master of Science in Exercise Science and Health Promotion from California University of Pennsylvania. AP: What is your educational background? JF: I expected athletic training while a senior in high school working alongside my high school's athletic trainer, Paul Pelquin. Paul Pelquin was my first mentor for the profession of athletic trainer. AP: Who are your athletic training mentors in New Jersey? JF: My mentors in this state were Dick Malacrea, Mike Goldenberg and Tim Sensor. Before New Jersey, Frank George was a great influence on who I am as an athletic trainer today. AP: What would you say is your greatest accomplishment as an athletic trainer? JF: So far in my career my great accomplishment as an athletic trainer was serving the ATSNJ as their President. It was a great honor to represent New Jersey as an Executive Board member for District 2 and meeting with numerous politicians on promoting athletic training and issues on health topics relating to athletic training. AP: Where have you been employed and in what capacity? JF: I have been employed in Massachusetts at Hawthorne Physical Therapy for 3 years as a physical therapist and the last year as athletic training/physical therapist working at Dartmouth High School in Dartmouth, MA along with working in the clinic. For the last 20 years I have been employed at Princeton University as athletic trainer/physical therapist. I have worked with many sports including men's hockey for the entire time. I am also working with non-varsity undergraduate and graduate population to provide physical therapy services through University Health Services. AP: What advice do you have for those young professionals in athletic training that are reading this article? JF: Do not wait to get involved in volunteering for the promotion of athletic training. Ask your leaders in the state and district level about how can you get involved. You will be the future of our profession and if you do not step up who will. The profession of athletic training has come a long way and we need to keep moving in the right direction. Do not be afraid for our leaders will guide you in formulating the tools you will need to become a future leader. AP: What do you feel is the key to longevity in the profession of athletic training? JF: Athletic trainers need to have a positive outlook along with flexibility to change with the times. I feel the setting I am in makes me feel young being surrounded with young and for the most part healthy individuals. AP: What emotions did you experience when you were awarded the Cramer award? JF: I was stunned, shocked and humbled. The past winners have molded the profession of athletic training from the beginnings where we did not have certification to the time we were considered as an Allied Health Care profession. Sharing this award with my mentor Frank George also make me speechless, for he was the second NATA president, past District 1 director and NATA Hall of Fame. So I truly honored to be selected. I am now the 4th athletic trainer from Princeton University with this award as I joined Eddie Zanfrini, Dick Malacrea and Charlie Thompson. AP: How do you advocate for athletic trainers and the profession of athletic training? JF: I have been at Capitol Hill Day for NATA in Washington, DC in 2014, 2015 and 2016. While at Capitol Hill Day, I have met with members from the office of New Jersey's US Senators and my Congressional Representative discussing proposed laws including The Sports Medicine Clarity Act and The Secondary School Athletes' Bill of Rights. In the state of New Jersey as ATSNJ president I met with assemblymen and state senators on several state proposed laws and issues including the revision of the Physical Therapy Practice Act which may have potential to impact the current practice of athletic trainers in the state of New Jersey. AP: Where do you see the profession of athletic training going in the next 5, 10 or 15 years? JF: In 10 years, I see athletic training with a sit at the table as billing providers of healthcare for all active individuals that services are rendered in the clinic/athletic training room. AP: One last question. If you could have dinner with 2 people, dead or alive, who would you invite and why? JF: I would pick Pinky Newell and Victor Vito Recine. Pinky Newell as a national leader as the head athletic trainer for Purdue University who linked the EATA to the NATA. The EATA was founded one year before the NATA. Pinky paved the way for athletic trainers and how we practice today. It would be great to get his insight and his method to our success as a profession. Victor Vito Recine was one of the founders of ATSNJ. ATSNJ started in his kitchen as he invited other athletic trainers to talk about the issues of their time. I would like to know what it took to formulate the ATSNJ and what were the issues of the times. AP: Mr. Furtado, congratulations on receiving the Cramer award. Thank you for taking the time to answer these questions for me. JF: No problem, Allan. Thank you for your time.


GETTYSBURG, PA--(Marketwired - October 24, 2016) - Recently, OPEN MINDS senior associate, Brandon Danz, was selected to present as a guest speaker during a lecture at Penn State Harrisburg. The class lecture given to students as part of a Health Systems course for health administration majors aimed to increase knowledge and understanding of the growth of managed care and value-based purchasing. In his lecture presentation, Mr. Danz discussed four key areas of managed care to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the growth and changes occurring in the managed care marketplace. The key areas covered during his lecture included: This guest lecture was for health administration students taking the health systems course offered with Dr. Hengameh Hosseini at Penn State Harrisburg. Dr. Hosseini is Assistant Professor of Healthcare Administration at the School of Public Affairs, Penn State Harrisburg. She has a Ph.D. in Health Promotion (receiving the University's Best Ph.D. Student Award), a graduate (Masters) degree with concentrations in Finance and Accounting, and an undergraduate degree majoring in Management. She is also interested in globalization and global aspects of healthcare. Mr. Danz also does similar guest lectures on health care related topics every semester at West Chester University, Shippensburg University. Starting in the spring semester, Mr. Danz will also be presenting this guest lecture at Pennsylvania State University's main campus. Brandon Danz, M.H.A, M.PA. has extensive expertise in health care system and health program design, policy, and regulation. Mr. Danz works with OPEN MINDS' clients to assist them in the development and implementation of strategies to respond to the changing health and human service environment. In this work at OPEN MINDS, he provides technical assistance on the impact of policy changes on operational margins, service delivery models, use of technology, and payment methodologies. Before joining OPEN MINDS, Mr. Danz worked as a Special Advisor to the Secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Human Services. In this role, he was involved with key initiatives in health care reform within the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. OPEN MINDS is a national strategic advisory firm specializing in the sectors of the health and human service industry serving individuals with complex support needs: mental health; addiction treatment; children & family services; intellectual & developmental disabilities; chronic disease management; long term care; social services; correctional health care, reentry & diversion; and juvenile justice. Founded in 1987 and based in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, the 75+ associates believe by providing the latest market intelligence and management best practices to organizations serving the health and social support needs of the most vulnerable consumers, those organizations will be better able to provide efficient and effective services. Learn more at www.openminds.com.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

New Jersey ranks among the top five states in the entire nation for the highest cancer rates, among all types and genders. And the need for advanced services is growing. Project WE vs C is a focused two-year campaign led by RWJ and its top-rated cancer care program, in collaboration with their non-profit partners in their fight against cancer and in support of their shared mission to champion the most cutting-edge cancer care services, technology and support for the communities it serves. Fundraising efforts will contribute to the vital $8.5 million, two-year project geared exclusively for enhancements to RWJ Hamilton’s comprehensive cancer program. The project is led by Diane Grillo, VP Health Promotion, RWJ Hamilton Foundation Board Member Lisa Freeman and Lindsay Warren, VP, RWJ Hamilton Foundation. From the start, their charge was to create a program that was distinctive and ownable in a crowded market filled with many Breast Cancer fundraising initiatives. The result is a first-of-its-kind program combining two related events. First, a Night of Inspiration on June 3, 2017, where attendees can experience the powerful healing effects of song, dance, music and the arts at the incomparable Grounds For Sculpture in Hamilton, NJ. Attendees will also be among the first to premiere renowned choreographer Mark Roxey's breathtaking multimedia performance, Breast Cancer: Personal Stories of Triumph. The next event, taking place on June 4th, will include the full Breast Cancer: Personal Stories of Triumph performance, as well as the ability for attendees to experience the healing gardens and tap into their creative side through music, art and nature, as well as enjoy unique exhibits and live entertainment. Morristown-based Trajectory LLC, specialists in branding and marketing across the health and wellness space, developed the Project WE vs C program name, logo and brand identity that umbrellas the overall two-year project and designed all launch marketing materials that will be leveraged across all rollout efforts. For more information about Project WE vs C, please visit http://www.http://www.rwjuhhfoundation.org/event/wevsc.html


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Fad diets can lead to quick weight loss, but lifestyle changes are how real and lasting results are achieved. Through an improved digestive system and metabolism, losing and keeping weight off is possible. In his new book, “Get Skinny! The Organic Way,” author, holistic healthcare practitioner and certified strength and conditioning specialist Andrew J. Fox offers readers a cookbook full of recipes perfect for busy individuals and families looking to lose weight and get healthy. The recipes use high-quality, fresh, local, organic ingredients that provide long-lasting energy. “The ultimate goal is to get you healthy so that you can get the lean, toned, muscular, athletic, vibrant and beautiful body that you have always wanted. This is the way your body wants to be and how you were created to be,” Fox said. “We were meant to eat food as close to nature as possible – whole, fresh, organic.” Fox has designed nutritional programs for doctors, universities, clinic and professional athletic facilities, as well as trained professional athletes, professional sports teams, Olympic teams, Division I college athletes as well as cover models, actors and celebrities. “The ‘Get Skinny’ cookbook will help you take charge of what you choose to eat and take ownership in how it’s prepared,” Fox said. “This ownership will empower you to want and expect the best out of your mind and body.” Get Skinny! The Organic Way By Andrew J. Fox HHP, MS, CSCS ISBN: 978-1-4917-6290-5 (sc) ISBN: 978-1-4917-6291-2 (e) Available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and iUniverse About the author Andrew J. Fox HHP, MS, CSCS, is a Holistic Healthcare Practitioner who also holds a Master's degree in Exercise Science and Health Promotion, and is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist. Fox founded TrueLife Fitness & Wellness in 2003 and has been endeavoring for over 12 years to bring people back to the true health we were created to enjoy. He resides with his wife Nicole in Thousand Oaks, Calif. This is Fox's second book.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

MINNEAPOLIS, Feb. 16, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- RedBrick Health, a leading provider of health and well-being solutions that deliver a better consumer experience and a stronger Culture of Health, has earned the National Committee for Quality Assurance's (NCQA) Wellness & Health Promotion...

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