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Singh V.P.,Health Physics Section | Singh V.P.,Karnatak University | Managanvi S.S.,Health Physics Section | Bihari R.R.,Radiological Physics and Advisory Division | Bhat H.R.,Nuclear Power Corporation of India
Radiation Protection Dosimetry | Year: 2013

Direct reading dosemeter has been used for day-to-day radiation exposure control and management for last four decades in Indian nuclear power plants (NPPs). Recently new real time, alarm and pre-alarm on equivalent dose/dose rate, storage of dose/dose rate and maximum dose rate, user-friendly electronic active personal dosemeter (APD) has been implemented into practice for the first time at Kaiga Atomic Power Station-3&4, of Indian NPPs. The dosemeter showed tolerance level (L) 0.1085±0.0450 compared with 0.1869±0.0729 (average±SD) for CaSO4:Dy, TL dosemeter, having narrow range trumpet curve, nil electromagnetic interference. Records of >29 000 for APD and TL dosemeter were analysed for comparasion of the measurement of the individual dose. APD followed general acceptance rule of ±25 % for dose >1 mSv. Monthly Station collective dose by TL dosemeters and APD for normal reactor operation as well as outage are found in good agreement. Operational experiences and statistical analysis support that an APD dosemeter is reasonably equivalent to CaSO4:Dy TL dosemeter. The accuracy, reproducibility and repeatability of the measurement of radiation for 137Cs are comparable with CaSO4:Dy, TL dosemeter. Operational experience of APD during the normal operation as well as outage showed as one of the best ALARA tool for occupational dose monitoring, control, management and future outage planning. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.


Singh V.P.,Health Physics Section | Singh V.P.,Karnatak University | Badiger N.M.,Karnatak University | Managanvi S.S.,Health Physics Section | Bhat H.R.,Nuclear Power Corporation of India
Radiation Protection Dosimetry | Year: 2012

Removal half-life (RHL) of tritium is one of the best means for optimising medical treatment, reduction of committed effective dose (CED) and quick/easy handling of a large group of workers for medical treatment reference. The removal of tritium from the body depends on age, temperature, relative humidity and daily rainfall; so tritium removal rate, its follow-up and proper data analysis and recording are the best techniques for management of accidental acute tritium exposed cases. The decision of referring for medical treatment or medical intervention (MI) would be based on workers' tritium RHL history taken from their bodies at the facilities. The workers with tritium intake up to 1 ALI shall not be considered for medical treatment as it is a derived limit of annual total effective dose. The short-term MI may be considered for tritium intake of 1-10 ALI; however, if the results show intake ≥100 ALI, extended strong medical/therapeutic intervention may be recommended based on the severity of exposure for maximum CED reduction requirements and annual total effective dose limit. The methodology is very useful for pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) which are mainly operated by Canada and India and future fusion reactor technologies. Proper management will optimise the cases for medical treatment and enhance public acceptance of nuclear fission and fusion reactor technologies. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.


Singh V.P.,Health Physics Section | Singh V.P.,Karnatak University | Veerendra D.D.,Health Physics Section | Dileep B.N.,Bhabha Atomic Research Center | And 4 more authors.
International Journal of Low Radiation | Year: 2011

A simple and economical passive graded shielding which is combination of low and high Z materials for HPGe detector for background radiation minimisation is developed for better identification of the peaks in acquired spectrum by reducing Compton continuum. The present paper discusses the design and advantages of the passive graded shielding (lead + copper + aluminium) which encloses the HPGe detector. The passive graded shielding improved sensitivity of the detector and reduced Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) for planchet source from 19.6% to 11.7% for gamma photon energies in the range of 81 -1408 keV and brought down the MDA, 35.25 GBq d -1 and 35.26 GBq d -1 for 133Xe and 135Xe respectively which was 72.31 GBq d -1 and 78.27 GBq d -1 for noble gases in gaseous effluents before shielding of the detector. The passive graded shielding as integral part is considerably very useful for radiological protection at nuclear power/research reactors by minimising background radiation. Copyright © 2011 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

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