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Schmitz S.M.,Supplement Safety Solutions | Hofheins J.E.,Health Market Science | Lemieux R.,Health Market Science
Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition | Year: 2010

Background: The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of supplementation with Gaspari Nutrition's SOmaxP Maximum Performance™ (SOmaxP) versus a comparator product (CP) containing an equal amount of creatine (4 g), carbohydrate (39 g maltodextrin), and protein (7 g whey protein hydrolysate) on muscular strength, muscular endurance, and body composition during nine weeks of intense resistance training.Methods: Using a prospective, randomized, double-blind design, 20 healthy men (mean ± SD age, height, weight, % body fat: 22.9 ± 2.6 y, 178.4 ± 5.7 cm, 80.5 ± 6.6 kg, 16.6 ± 4.0%) were matched for age, body weight, resistance training history, bench press strength, bench press endurance, and percent body fat and then randomly assigned via the ABBA procedure to ingest 1/2 scoop (dissolved in 15 oz water) of SOmaxP or CP prior to, and another 1/2 scoop (dissolved in 15 oz water) during resistance exercise. Body composition (DEXA), muscular performance (1-RM bench press and repetitions to failure [RTF: 3 sets × baseline body weight, 60-sec rest between sets]), and clinical blood chemistries were measured at baseline and after nine weeks of supplementation and training. Subjects were required to maintain their normal dietary habits and follow a specific, progressive overload resistance training program (4-days/wk, upper body/lower body split) during the study. An intent-to-treat approach was used and data were analyzed via ANCOVA using baseline values as the covariate. Statistical significance was set a priori at p ≤ 0.05.Results: When adjusted for initial differences, significant between group post-test means were noted in: 1-RM bench press (SOmaxP: 133.3 ± 1.3 kg [19.8% increase] vs. CP: 128.5 ± 1.3 kg [15.3% increase]; p < 0.019); lean mass (SOmaxP: 64.1 ± 0.4 kg [2.4% increase] vs. 62.8 ± 0.4 kg [0.27% increase], p < 0.049); RTF (SOmaxP: 33.3 ± 1.1 reps [44.8% increase] vs. 27.8 ± 1.1 reps [20.9% increase], p < 0.004); and fat mass (SOmaxP: 12.06 ± 0.53 kg [9.8% decrease] vs. 13.90 ± 0.53 kg [4.1% increase], p < 0.024). No statistically significant differences in vital signs (heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressures) or clinical blood chemistries were noted.Conclusions: These data indicate that compared to CP, SOmaxP administration augments and increases gains in lean mass, bench press strength, and muscular performance during nine weeks of intense resistance training. Studies designed to confirm these results and clarify the molecular mechanisms by which SOmaxP exerts the observed salutary effects have begun. Both SOmaxP and the CP were well-tolerated, and no supplement safety issues were identified. © 2010 Schmitz et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Kresakova L.,University of Veterinary and Pharmacy in Kosice | Purzyc H.,Wrocław University | Schusterova I.,Slovak Eastern Institute of Heart Disease | Fulton B.,Health Market Science | And 5 more authors.
Biologia (Poland) | Year: 2014

The objective of this study was to describe the uncommon connections between cardiac veins, alternative pathways within cardiac venous circulation and complex variability of the venous system in the heart ventricles. The study was carried out on 30 adult New Zealand White rabbits. The arrangement of the cardiac veins was studied by using the corrosion casts prepared with the Spofacryl® and by perfusion of coloured latex. The presence and organization of principal veins of the heart ventricles was relatively constant with a great variability in the mode of opening and forming a common trunk. The highest variations were observed in the region of the paraconal interventricular vein, the left and right marginal vein and the left distal ventricular vein. The left proximal ventricular vein was an inconstant tributary of the left circumflex vein and was seen in 17% of cases. The left distal ventricular vein was visible as one (13% of cases) or two veins (87% of cases). Angular vein was observed in 20% of cases. Numerous anastomosis were found among cardiac veins. © 2014, Versita Warsaw and Springer-Verlag Wien.


Kresakova L.,University of Veterinary Medicine in Kosice | Purzyc H.,Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences | Schusterova I.,Slovak Eastern Institute of Heart Disease | Fulton B.,Health Market Science | And 4 more authors.
Anatomical Science International | Year: 2015

The aim of this study was to describe the uncommon intracranial venous connections and vein structures that may play a role in the redirection of cerebral blood drainage. The study was carried out on 35 adult Wistar rats. Corrosion casts were prepared from the cerebral venous system and Spofacryl® was used as a casting medium. The highest prevalence of non-standard connections and variations was noted in the region of sinus petrosus dorsalis (SPD) (31.2 %) and v. cerebri magna (VCM) (28.5 %). SPD established a non-standard anastomosis with sinus petrosus ventralis in 8.6 % of cases, with sinus interperiopticus in 2.8 % of cases, with sinus sigmoideus in 5.7 % of cases and with confluens sinuum (CS) in 2.8 % of cases, where higher prevalence was observed on the left side of the brain. In 11.4 % of cases VCM formed a secondary connection between CS and sinus rectus leading to the formation of the loop. In a similar manner, VCM entered the sinus transversus in 8.6 % of cases, while in 5.7 % of cases VCM merged with SPD and formed an unusual connection among dorsal and ventral systems of sinuses. Several sinuses were observed as inconsistent, including sinus occipitalis (14.3 %), sinus intercavernosus rostralis (22.8 %) and sinus interbasilaris (14.3 %). The hypoplastic posterior and anterior anastomotic vein did not reach one another in 20 % of observed cases. Anatomical information concerning different drainage pathways are important in preoperative planning and can provide necessary understanding in experimental studies, including cerebral vein occlusion, venous infarction, or experimentally induced cerebral venous obstruction. © 2014, Japanese Association of Anatomists.


Goldstein E.R.,Florida Atlantic University | Ziegenfuss T.,Health Market Science | Kalman D.,MRA Clinical Research | Kreider R.,Texas A&M University | And 11 more authors.
Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition | Year: 2010

Position Statement: The position of The Society regarding caffeine supplementation and sport performance is summarized by the following seven points: 1.) Caffeine is effective for enhancing sport performance in trained athletes when consumed in low-to-moderate dosages (~3-6 mg/kg) and overall does not result in further enhancement in performance when consumed in higher dosages >9 mg/kg). 2.) Caffeine exerts a greater ergogenic effect when consumed in an anhydrous state as compared to coffee. 3.) It has been shown that caffeine can enhance vigilance during bouts of extended exhaustive exercise, as well as periods of sustained sleep deprivation. 4.) Caffeine is ergogenic for sustained maximal endurance exercise, and has been shown to be highly effective for time-trial performance. 5.) Caffeine supplementation is beneficial for high-intensity exercise, including team sports such as soccer and rugby, both of which are categorized by intermittent activity within a period of prolonged duration. 6.) The literature is equivocal when considering the effects of caffeine supplementation on strength-power performance, and additional research in this area is warranted. 7.) The scientific literature does not support caffeine-induced diuresis during exercise, or any harmful change in fluid balance that would negatively affect performance.© 2010 Goldstein et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


ATLANTA--(BUSINESS WIRE)--LexisNexis® Risk Solutions today announced the LexisNexis 2015 Top 100 Home Health and Hospice Agencies Rankings, comprehensive rankings of the leading providers of home health and hospice services in the U.S. based on annual claims and patient volumes. The rankings provide home health and hospice services companies with market landscape information to help them better understand their market position, dynamics and environment for potential M&A activity and grow their businesses. The LexisNexis 2015 Top 100 Home Health and Hospice Agencies Rankings were compiled by LexisNexis Risk Solutions using medical claims and patient volume data from the industry leading MarketView™ claims database. LexisNexis takes a unique multi-channel approach to sourcing medical claims data, gathering and analyzing more than 1.2 billion claims, scrubbed for anonymity, from entities within the adjudication process, practice management and billing systems, claims clearinghouses, and payers including government agencies. “Today’s home health and hospice providers are faced with more patients, decreased reimbursements and an increasing need to merge, partner and evaluate the competitive landscape to compete and comply with federal and state regulations,” said Chris Golden, Home Health and Hospice Strategist, LexisNexis Risk Solutions. “LexisNexis evaluates the market, leveraging comprehensive and unique data, analytics and technology using medical claims and unique patient counts. By doing so, we supply the industry with one of the most accurate views of the home health and hospice market, and we help our customers research opportunities to advance their growth strategies.” “Encompass Home Health moved from seventh on the Top Home Health Agencies list to fifth this year by executing on our acquisition strategy,” said Luke James, Chief Strategy Officer, Encompass Home Health. “Using the information provided by LexisNexis /Health Market Science and the company’s data experts, we had a lens into the competitive marketplace. This insight allowed us to be methodical and succinct in growing our business, which ultimately allows us to better serve our patients.” To read the full list of 100 companies serving the home health and hospice communities, visit: http://solutions.lexisnexis.com/Top100List. LexisNexis Risk Solutions (http://www.lexisnexis.com/risk/) is a leader in providing essential information that helps customers across industries and government predict, assess and manage risk. Combining cutting-edge technology, unique data and advanced analytics, LexisNexis Risk Solutions provides products and services that address evolving client needs in the risk sector while upholding the highest standards of security and privacy. LexisNexis Risk Solutions is part of RELX Group plc, a world-leading provider of information solutions for professional customers across industries.


News Article | May 18, 2010
Site: www.zdnet.com

VistA, the health record system created by the Veterans Administration long before the term "open source" was even in use, is still the most-important element in open source health IT. But it's far from the only one, according to a new analysis from Black Duck Software. Black Duck estimates there are now nearly 900 open source projects with a health focus, a 13% increase from a year ago, estimating the value of the code base is up 25% from a year ago, to $8 billion. Black Duck, which recently joined Open Health Tools, has compiled 10 of the most popular open source health IT projects out there. I compiled basic research on nine of them for this report. In addition to VistA, the winners are: Care2X, which is hosted at Sourceforge, bills itself as a full hospital management system using either mySQL or PostgreSQL and PHP, but it seems to have hit hard times. The main URL, care2x.org/, appears shuttered, most comments about it at Sourceforge are negative, and its developers appear to be spread around the globe. OsiriX is an image processor for the Mac that is dedicated to the .DCM format used by a variety of commercial CT and MRI scanners. It was developed in Switzerland, and supports a plug-in architecture that allows users to expand it in order to fit their needs. Biosignal Tools is a software library for processing signals from EEG and ECG devices using Matlab, Octave, C/C++ and Python. There's a standalone viewer supporting more than 30 different data formats. Lead developer Alois Schloegl contributed new code to it less than a week ago. FreeMED is an electronic health record (EHR) system that runs on a common LAMP stack. There is both commercial and community support for the product. The 10-year old project has its own supporting foundation and forge site. It features a modular design and supports an external billing system. OpenEMR is a complete medical practice suite, licensed under the GPL. It is multi-platform and includes systems to handle both billing and e-prescribing. Its most recent stable release came out in February. An appliance version running under VMWare is also available, operating as a sub-project, and the description includes installation documentation and screen shots. DVTk (the lower-case k is important, or you're headed for a football game) is a testing suite that seeks to integrate imaging with HL7 documentation and IHE management standards.  It began in 1998 with code contributed by Philips, and is managed by a steering committee heavily influenced by Philips and Agfa, a Belgian multinational. OGLE, the Open GLExtractor, is a general purpose program for re-using 3D data from Windows programs. It connects OpenGL library with a variety of 3D programs. Because this imaging system supports a variety of industries, including video games, it has a sizable community behind it, backed by EYEBEAM, a non-profit based in New York City. HOSxP is a hospital management from Thailand (where it is probably getting a workout due to unrest) that currently runs in over 300 hospitals. Nearly a dozen upgrade files have been posted to Sourceforge in the last month. Its interface mimics Microsoft Windows regardless of the environment used and is available under the GPL. OpenHMS is actually a collection of LGPL projects organized by Health Market Science, a Pennsylvania health information systems company. Most are libraries and utilities for reading out of databases.


News Article | December 9, 2010
Site: www.xconomy.com

MedNetworks Taps UCSD’s James Fowler and Other Experts for New Scientific Board MedNetworks has significantly enhanced its brain trust as it sets out to conquer the emerging field of social networks analytics in healthcare. The Newton, MA-based startup has announced the creation of a scientific advisory board, which is headlined by the authors of the highly acclaimed book on social networks, “Connected,” Nicholas Christakis and James Fowler. Christakis, a physician and social scientist from Harvard University, co-founded MedNetworks and his lab provided the startup’s core technology. Fowler’s involvement with the company is a new development, however. Fowler is a renowned professor of medical genetics and political science at the University of California, San Diego, whose research has explored the genetic underpinnings of certain political behaviors. In addition to his new role at MedNetworks, Fowler said, he is collaborating with Palo Alto, CA-based Facebook on projects such as how to define whom among people’s Facebook networks are most influential in their lives. Fowler’s expertise appears to be a perfect fit for MedNetworks. The company’s software is designed to help various stakeholders in healthcare to map, analyze, and activate existing social networks. This enables, say, a drug company working on a new product launch to target its efforts in an effective manner by focusing on doctors who have the most influence on their peers. Also, employers could use the software to optimize their smoking cessation plans by focusing on employees whose healthy behaviors could rub off on their coworkers who smoke. Company CEO Larry Miller explained the startup’s technology and history to me in greater depth in October. MedNetworks’s scientific advisory board “is something of a dream team,” Fowler said. “The people who are on the advisory board are really the big names in the field.” The rest of the company’s newly announced scientific advisors include: F. Thomas Balzer, the former chief scientist of Health Market Science and the founder and CEO of Optio Research; Albert-Laszlo Barabasi, a professor and the director of Northeastern University’s Center for Complex Network Research; David Flaschen, a partner at the private equity firm Castanea Partners; Guido Imbens, an economics professor at Harvard University; Michael Kearns, a professor of computer and information science at University of Pennsylvania; Bruce Landon, an associate professor in the department of medicine and health care policy at Harvard Medical School; Curtis Langlotz, a professor and vice chair for informatics at the department of radiology at University of Pennsylvania; and Stanley Wasserman, a statistics professor at Indiana University. Christakis, the chairman of the advisory board, spends his days as a professor of healthcare policy at Harvard. Fowler said that a strong scientific advisory board is important for MedNetworks because of the rapid pace of new discoveries in the field of social networks analysis. “If you weren’t actively engaged in the academic side of this field,” he said, “it would be very hard to be a leader in the business world using these technologies.”


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