Health Effects Group

Kjeller, Norway

Health Effects Group

Kjeller, Norway
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Hudecova A.,Health Effects Group | Hudecova A.,Comenius University | Kusznierewicz B.,Gdask University of Technology | Runden-Pran E.,Health Effects Group | And 19 more authors.
Mutagenesis | Year: 2012

Among nanomaterials, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have the broadest and most commercial applications due to their antibacterial properties, highlighting the need for exploring their potential toxicity and underlying mechanisms of action. Our main aim was to investigate whether AgNPs exert toxicity by inducing oxidative damage to DNA in human kidney HEK 293 cells. In addition, we tested whether this damage could be counteracted by plant extracts containing phytochemicals such as swertiamarin, mangiferin and homoorientin with high antioxidant abilities. We show that AgNPs (20nm) are taken up by cells and localised in vacuoles and cytoplasm. Exposure to 1, 25 or 100 μg/ml AgNPs leads to a significant dose-dependent increase in oxidised DNA base lesions (8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine or 8-oxoG) detected by the comet assay after incubation of nucleoids with 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase. Oxidised DNA base lesions and strand breaks caused by AgNPs were diminished by aqueous and methanolic extracts from both haulm and flower of Gentiana asclepiadea. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society. All rights reserved.


Dusinska M.,Health Effects Group
Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.) | Year: 2013

Among beneficial applications of nanotechnology, nanomedicine offers perhaps the greatest potential for improving human conditions and quality of life. Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), with their unique properties, have potential to improve therapy of many human disorders. The properties that make ENMs so useful could also lead to unintentional adverse health effects. Challenges arising from physicochemical properties of ENMs, their characterization, exposure, and hazard assessment and other key issues of ENM safety are discussed. There is still scant knowledge about ENM cellular uptake, transport across biological barriers, distribution within the body, and possible mechanisms of toxicity. The safety of ENMs should be tested to minimize possible risk before the application. However, existing toxicity tests need to be adapted to fit to the unique features related to the nanosized material and appropriate controls and reference material should be considered.


Dusinska M.,Health Effects Group | Magdolenova Z.,Health Effects Group | Fjellsbo L.M.,Health Effects Group
Methods in Molecular Biology | Year: 2013

Among bene fi cial applications of nanotechnology, nanomedicine offers perhaps the greatest potential for improving human conditions and quality of life. Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), with their unique properties, have potential to improve therapy of many human disorders. The properties that make ENMs so useful could also lead to unintentional adverse health effects. Challenges arising from physicochemical properties of ENMs, their characterization, exposure, and hazard assessment and other key issues of ENM safety are discussed. There is still scant knowledge about ENM cellular uptake, transport across biological barriers, distribution within the body, and possible mechanisms of toxicity. The safety of ENMs should be tested to minimize possible risk before the application. However, existing toxicity tests need to be adapted to fi t to the unique features related to the nanosized material and appropriate controls and reference material should be considered. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2013.


Hasplova K.,Comenius University | Hasplova K.,Health Effects Group | Hudecova A.,Comenius University | Hudecova A.,Health Effects Group | And 8 more authors.
Neoplasma | Year: 2011

Varied medicinal plants are known as a source of natural phytochemicals with antioxidant activities that can protect organisms from oxidative stress and from various chronic diseases. Papaver rhoeas has a long history of medicinal usage, especially for ailments in adults and children. The possible cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and potential antioxidant effect of plant extract isolated from flowers of Papaver rhoeas was investigated in human lymfoblastoid cell line (TK6). Antioxidant activity of this extract was determined using the DPPH assay. The plant extract exhibited dose dependent free radical scavenging ability. The growth activity assay was used for determination of cytotoxicity. To assess potential genotoxicity the comet assay was used. The lower extract concentrations (0.25 and 0.5 mg/ml) neither exerted cytotoxic, nor genotoxic effects in TK6 cells but they stimulated cell proliferation. The concentration 25 mg/ml scavenged almost 85% of DPPH free radical. On the other hand, this concentration had strong cytotoxic and genotoxic effect on TK6 cells. The balance between beneficial and harmful effects should be always considered when choosing the effective dose.


PubMed | Health Effects Group
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Mutagenesis | Year: 2012

Among nanomaterials, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have the broadest and most commercial applications due to their antibacterial properties, highlighting the need for exploring their potential toxicity and underlying mechanisms of action. Our main aim was to investigate whether AgNPs exert toxicity by inducing oxidative damage to DNA in human kidney HEK 293 cells. In addition, we tested whether this damage could be counteracted by plant extracts containing phytochemicals such as swertiamarin, mangiferin and homoorientin with high antioxidant abilities. We show that AgNPs (20 nm) are taken up by cells and localised in vacuoles and cytoplasm. Exposure to 1, 25 or 100 g/ml AgNPs leads to a significant dose-dependent increase in oxidised DNA base lesions (8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine or 8-oxoG) detected by the comet assay after incubation of nucleoids with 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase. Oxidised DNA base lesions and strand breaks caused by AgNPs were diminished by aqueous and methanolic extracts from both haulm and flower of Gentiana asclepiadea.


PubMed | Health Effects Group
Type: | Journal: Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.) | Year: 2012

Among beneficial applications of nanotechnology, nanomedicine offers perhaps the greatest potential for improving human conditions and quality of life. Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), with their unique properties, have potential to improve therapy of many human disorders. The properties that make ENMs so useful could also lead to unintentional adverse health effects. Challenges arising from physicochemical properties of ENMs, their characterization, exposure, and hazard assessment and other key issues of ENM safety are discussed. There is still scant knowledge about ENM cellular uptake, transport across biological barriers, distribution within the body, and possible mechanisms of toxicity. The safety of ENMs should be tested to minimize possible risk before the application. However, existing toxicity tests need to be adapted to fit to the unique features related to the nanosized material and appropriate controls and reference material should be considered.

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