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Terry P.E.,Park Nicollet Institute | Terry P.E.,Stay Well Health Management | Fowles J.B.,Health Research Center | Xi M.,Health Research Center | Harvey L.,Health Education Research Systems, Inc.
American Journal of Health Promotion | Year: 2011

Purpose. This study compares a traditional worksite-based health promotion program with an activated consumer program and a control program Design. Group randomized controlled trial with 18-month intervention. Setting. Two large Midwestern companies. Subjects. Three hundred and twenty employees (51% response). Intervention. The traditional health promotion intervention offered population-level campaigns on physical activity, nutrition, and stress management. The activated consumer intervention included population-level campaigns for evaluating health information, choosing a health benefits plan, and understanding the risks of not taking medications as prescribed. The personal development intervention (control group) offered information on hobbies. The interventions also offered individual-level coaching for high risk individuals in both active intervention groups. Measures. Health risk status, general health status, consumer activation, productivity, and the ability to evaluate health information. Analysis. Multivariate analyses controlled for baseline differences among the study groups. Results. At the population level, compared with baseline performance, the traditional health promotion intervention improved health risk status, consumer activation, and the ability to recognize reliable health websites. Compared with baseline performance, the activated consumer intervention improved consumer activation, productivity, and the ability to recognize reliable health websites. At the population level, however, only the activated consumer intervention improved any outcome more than the control group did; that outcome was consumer activation. At the individual level for high risk individuals, both traditional health coaching and activated consumer coaching positively affected health risk status and consumer activation. In addition, both coaching interventions improved participant ability to recognize a reliable health website. Consumer activation coaching also significantly improved self-reported productivity. Conclusion. An effective intervention can change employee health risk status and activation both at the population level and at the individual high risk level. However, program engagement at the population level was low, indicating that additional promotional strategies, such as greater use of incentives, need to be examined. Less intensive coaching can be as effective as more intensive, albeit both interventions produced modest behavior change and retention in the consumer activation arm was most difficult. Further research is needed concerning recruitment and retention methods that will enable populations to realize the full potential of activated consumerism. Copyright © 2011 by American Journal of Health Promotion, Inc.


Van Der Sluis A.,University of Groningen | Van Der Sluis A.,Health Education Research Systems, Inc. | Elferink-Gemser M.T.,University of Groningen | Elferink-Gemser M.T.,HAN University of Applied Sciences | And 4 more authors.
International Journal of Sports Medicine | Year: 2014

In young athletes, demands of sports are superimposed on normal growth and maturation. It has been suggested that this causes a temporarily increased vulnerability for injuries. We followed 26 talented soccer players (mean age 11.9±0.84 years) longitudinally for 3 years around their adolescent growth spurt, called Peak Height Velocity, to identify differences in number of traumatic and overuse injuries and days missed due to injuries. Peak Height Velocity was calculated according to the Maturity Offset Protocol. The number of injuries was calculated for each player per year. A repeated measurement analysis showed that athletes had significantly more traumatic injuries in the year of Peak Height Velocity (1.41) than in the year before Peak Height Velocity (0.81). A moderate effect size of 0.42 was found for the difference in number of overuse injuries per player per year before (0.81) and after Peak Height Velocity (1.41), respectively. Finally, a moderate effect size of 0.55 was found for difference between days missed due to injuries before (7.27 days per player per year) and during Peak Height Velocity (15.69 days per player per year). Adolescent growth spurt seems to result in increased vulnerability for traumatic injuries. Afterwards athletes seem to be susceptible to overuse injuries. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.


Van Der Sluis A.,University of Groningen | Van Der Sluis A.,Health Education Research Systems, Inc. | Elferink-Gemser M.T.,University of Groningen | Elferink-Gemser M.T.,HAN University of Applied Sciences | And 2 more authors.
International Journal of Sports Medicine | Year: 2015

The purpose of this study was to identify differences in traumatic and overuse injury incidence between talented soccer players who differ in the timing of their adolescent growth spurt. 26 soccer players (mean age 11.9±0.84 years) were followed longitudinally for 3 years around Peak Height Velocity, calculated according to the Maturity Offset Protocol. The group was divided into an earlier and later maturing group by median split. Injuries were registered following the FIFA consensus statement. Mann-Whitney tests showed that later maturing players had a significantly higher overuse injury incidence than their earlier maturing counterparts both in the year before Peak Height Velocity (3.53 vs. 0.49 overuse injuries/1 000 h of exposure, U=49.50, z=-2.049, p<0.05) and the year of Peak Height Velocity (3.97 vs. 1.56 overuse injuries/1 000 h of exposure, U=50.5, z=-1.796, p<0.05). Trainers and coaches should be careful with the training and match load they put on talented soccer players, especially those physically not (yet) able to handle that load. Players appear to be especially susceptible to injury between 13.5 and 14.5 years of age. Training and match load should be structured relative to maturity such that athletic development is maximized and the risk of injury is minimized.


Leake A.R.,University of Hawaii at Manoa | Bermudo V.C.,Health Education Research Systems, Inc. | Jacob J.,Philippine Nurses Association of Hawaii | Jacob M.R.,Philippine Nurses Association of Hawaii | Inouye J.,University of Hawaii at Manoa
Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health | Year: 2012

Diabetes prevention requires lifestyle changes, and traditional educational programs for lifestyle changes have had low attendance rates in ethnic populations. This article describes the development and implementation of an educational program, emphasizing retention strategies, cultural tailoring and community participation. Community- based participatory research approaches were used to adapt and test the feasibility of a culturally tailored lifestyle intervention (named Health is Wealth) for Filipino-American adults at risk for diabetes (n = 40) in order to increase program attendance. A unique feature of this program was the flexibility of scheduling the eight classes, and inclusion of activities, foods and proverbs consistent with Filipino culture. We found that with this approach, overall program attendance for the experimental and wait-listed control groups was 88% and participant satisfaction was high with 93% very satisfied. Flexible scheduling, a bilingual facilitator for the classes, and the community-academic partnership contributed to the high attendance for this lifestyle intervention. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011.


PubMed | Health Education Research Systems, Inc., Lautoka Hospital and International Diabetes Federation
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Pediatric diabetes | Year: 2016

Determine the incidence and prevalence of diabetes in children <15 yr in Fiji.Data on all new cases from 2001 to 2012 was collected from the three paediatric diabetes services through the International Diabetes Federation Life for a Child Program. There was no formal secondary ascertainment source, however the medical community is small and all known cases are believed to be included.Forty-two children aged <15 yr were diagnosed from 2001 to 2012. Twenty-eight were type 1 (66.7%), 13 type 2 (31.0%), and 1 (2.4%) had neonatal diabetes (INS gene mutation). For type 1, the mean standard deviation (SD) age of diagnosis was 10.2 2.9 yr, with similar proportions of males and females. Four (14.3%) were native Fijians and 24 (86.7%) were of Indo-Fijian descent (p < 0.001). The mean annual incidence of type 1 in children <15 yr was 0.93/100,000 and prevalence in 2012 was 5.9/100,000. There was no evidence of a rise in incidence, but low numbers would preclude recognition of a small increased rate. For the 13 cases of type 2 diabetes, the mean SD age of diagnosis was 12.2 2.7 yr, 85% were female (p < 0.01), and 85% were of Indo-Fijian descent (p = 0.001). The mean annual incidence of type 2 was 0.43/100,000 and 2012 prevalence was 2.4/100,000. No child with diabetes aged <15 yr died during the 12-yr period.The incidence of type 1 diabetes in Fiji is very low. Furthermore, its occurrence is markedly more frequent in Indo-Fijians than in native Fijians. Type 2 and neonatal diabetes also occur.


Stothard B.,Health Education Research Systems, Inc.
Drugs and Alcohol Today | Year: 2010

Russian interest in drug education and prevention programmes for schools is a response to growing official awareness of substance misuse. Official voices tend to make a distinction between alcohol and other substances, although recent moves have been made to increase the price of alcohol. Moralising and authoritarian attitudes persist, with a reliance on the ‘medical model’ of health education. Practitioners are increasingly aware of and interested in evidence-based approaches, including interactive methodologies in the classroom. The implications for professional training are responded to by the inclusion of teacher training materials in many school programmes in Russia. At the primary prevention level, there are many parallels with UK practice. In my experience, additional similarities are in the differences of awareness and understanding between practitioners and decision-makers, with the latter not always fully aware of the needs and situations of young people in both countries. The major difference is in official Russian attitude and practice towards illegal drug users. Whereas UK practice is pragmatic and concentrates on getting individuals into treatment, in Russia there is demonisation and marginalisation of illegal drug users; a national ban on substitute prescription; and a widespread local ban on needle exchanges. The primary prevention interest in evidence-based practice does not extend to treatment. © 2010, Emerald Group Publishing Limited


Warwick C.,Health Education Research Systems, Inc.
Education for Primary Care | Year: 2014

International medical graduates (IMGs) form a vital group of general practitioners (GPs) in the NHS. They are known to face additional challenges above and beyond those faced by UK medical graduates in the course of their GP training. Whilst they are a heterogeneous group of professionals, their views on what they need to learn, and how they are supported, are often distant from those of the educators responsible for planning their education. This study was undertaken, through narrativebased focus groups, to explore the issues which matter to the IMGs, in an attempt to empower their voices about their experiences in GP training, and to see what lessons could be drawn from these views. The findings confirmed the central importance, and considerable challenge involved, in making an effective transition into the culture of the NHS and UK general practice. The IMGs felt that induction needed to be an on-going, iterative process of learning which continued throughout training, with a more effective individualised learning needs analysis at the start of GP training. Lack of sophisticated language skills was highlighted as a real concern. Recognition that their lack of knowledge about the NHS at the start of training should not be seen as an indicator of deficiency, but a clue to what they needed to learn were also key messages. IMGs also felt the earlier in their training they undertook a GP placement, the quicker they would start to understand the culture of general practice in the UK. Further work following on from this research should include how to manage change in the educational network for these barriers to be overcome.


Goodyear H.M.,Health Education Research Systems, Inc.
International journal of medical education | Year: 2014

OBJECTIVE: To explore factors which affect newly qualified doctors' wellbeing and look at the implications for educational provision.METHODS: Data were collected by free association narrative interviews of nine Foundation doctors and analysed using a grounded theory approach. Two Foundation programme directors were interviewed to verify data validity.RESULTS: Two main themes emerged: newly qualified doctors' wellbeing is affected by 1) personal experience and 2) work related factors. They start work feeling unprepared by medical school, work experience ("shadowing") or induction programmes at the beginning of the post. Senior colleague support and feedback are much valued but often lacking with little discussion of critical incidents and difficult issues. Challenges include sick patients, prescribing, patient/relative communication and no consistent team structure. Working shift patterns affects personal and social life. Enjoyment and reward come from helping patients, feelings of making a difference or teaching medical students.CONCLUSIONS: Whilst becoming familiar with their roles, newly qualified doctors search for identity and build up resilience. The support given during this process affects their wellbeing including coping with day to day challenges, whether posts are experienced as rewarding and how work influences their personal and social lives.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 480.14K | Year: 2012

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): (Phase-2, Renewal) The SACC-Substance Addiction Collaboration Channel(R) platform is a new Collaboration, WEB-2.0 springboard specifically designed to structure and share information across the Behavioral/Mental Health Workforce community with the special focus on Substance-Addiction Disorders. SACC is an individual and group-level application platform that is akin to Facebook and other social networking applications. The foremost goal of SACC is to stem the information delivery crisis that now faces this clinical Workforce and to stem the tide of fragmentation across the service delivery sector. This crisis is significantly hindering the delivery of key diagnostic and treatment service to a population that is spread across our national landscape: the Urban-to-Suburban-to-Rural-to-Frontier setting. The SACC platform is a new WEB-2.0 collaboration platform that is built upon the most recent engineering software systems. It focuses on learning, sharing and structuring behavioral/mental health best practices. Members from professional associations and focus action teams strategically located in multiple states have helped in the pre-planning analysis and design of the SACC platform. MRI image sets have been translated into 3D- and 4D-image sequences that show both healthy and non-healthy brains. The brain models then are hyperlinked to new research findings that, together, form a unique Visual Knowledge Base that the addiction community can quickly access, share, addto, and discuss. New User Interface utilities are built into SACC including access portals to the Visual Knowledge Base, a new generation of interactive e-Learning modules that heretofore have not been available, and content from the NIDA-TOOLKIT. For thefirst time, the SACC platform provides new collaboration channels that inter-link researchers, clinicians, families, communities and individuals. It is believed the evaluation process will show the efficacy of SACC as a significant, long-term benefit forchanging service delivery. Thus, SACC will become a primary force in finally establishing a valid credentialing/ licensing process that has been sought after for so long. The SACC team consists of experts from psychiatry, neurology, nursing, addiction counseling, social work, occupational therapy, clinical anatomy, computer engineering, medical visualization, instructional technology and a milieu of community volunteers spread across Rural America. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: This 24-month, Phase-2 SBIR project is called: SACC--[the] Substance Abuse Collaboration Channel(R) . For the first time, the SACC platform unifies the clinical and services intervention communities by providing a newly focused WEB-2.0 design that integrates enabling technologiesspecifically designed for collaborative communications. The SACC platform focuses on knowledge discovery, brain modeling linked to behavioral health, clinical support, and peer-to-peer information sharing-all elements that form the springboard needed to improve our national and global public behavioral/mental healthcare delivery systems. For the first time, delivery of Evidenced-based Services developed for community settings in Rural and Frontier regions will be possible. These communities always have been hampered by the Lack of State-of-Art Information desperately needed of clinical interventions, for the information resources needed to improve organizational structures and activities that make effective implementation of key interventions possible.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 194.14K | Year: 2010

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The SACC-Substance Addiction Collaboration Channel(R) platform is a new Collaboration, WEB-2.0 springboard specifically designed to structure and share information across the Behavioral/Mental Health Workforce community with the special focus on Substance-Addiction Disorders. SACC is an individual and group-level application platform that is akin to Facebook and other social networking applications. The foremost goal of SACC is to stem the information delivery crisis that now faces the Addiction Workforce and to stem the tide of fragmentation across the service delivery sector. This crisis is significantly hindering the delivery of key diagnostic and treatment services to a population that is spread across our national landscape: the Urban-to-Suburban-to-Rural-to-Frontier environments. The SACC platform is a new WEB-2.0 collaboration platform that is built upon the most recent engineering software systems. It focuses on learning, sharing and structuring behavioral/mental health best practices. Members from professional associations and focus group teams strategically located in the Western States have helped in the pre-planning analysis and design of the SACC platform. MRI image sets have been translated into 3D- and 4D-image sequences that show both healthy and non-healthy brains. The brain models then are hyperlinked to new research findings that, together, form a unique Visual Knowledge Base that the addiction community can quickly access, share, add to, and discuss. New User Interface utilities are built into SACC including access portals to the Visual Knowledge Base, and a new generation of interactive E-Learning modules that are built from content in the NIDA-TOOLKIT. For the first time, the SACC platform provides new collaboration channels that inter-link researchers, clinicians, families, communities and individuals. During Phase-1, only Formative Evaluation will be used because of the 12- month time frame constraints. However, during Phase-2, a fully structured Summative Evaluation will be used to validate the central hypothesis upon which SACC is built. These activities during Phase-2 will use randomly selected experimental/control group pilot test sites in urban-rural clinics over a multi-state region. It is believed the evaluation process will show the efficacy of SACC as a significant, long-term benefit to changing service delivery. Thus, SACC will become the primary force in finally establishing a valid credentialing/licensing process that has been sought after for so long. The SACC team consists of experts from neurology, psychiatry, nursing, addiction counseling, social work, occupational therapy, clinical anatomy, computer engineering, medical visualization, instructional technology and a milieu of community volunteers spread across Rural America. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: This 12month, Phase-1 SBIR project is called: SACC--[the] Substance Abuse Collaboration Channel(R) . For the first time, the SACC platform unifies the clinical and services intervention communities by providing a newly focused WEB-2.0 design that integrates enabling technologies specifically designed for collaborative communications, including: Blogs, Wikis, Video Sharing, Audio/Pod- casting, Social Networking, Web feeds, Widgets, Webinar/Webcasts and a new generation of interactive E-Learning content relevant to the Substance-Addiction community. The SACC platform focuses on knowledge discovery, brain modeling linked to behavioral health, clinical support, and peer-to-peer information sharing-all elements that form the springboard needed to improve our national and global public behavioral/mental healthcare delivery systems. For the first time, delivery of Evidenced-based Services developed for community settings in Rural and Frontier regions will be possible. These communities always have been hampered by the Lack of State-of-Art Information desperately needed of clinical interventions, for the information resources needed to improve organizational structures and activities that make effective implementation of key interventions possible. SACC finally delivers on the promise to provide state-of- the-art interactive training and communities.

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