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Dedert E.A.,Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center | Dedert E.A.,Duke University | Dedert E.A.,Veterans Affairs Mid Atlantic Region Mental Illness Research | Wilson S.M.,Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center | And 12 more authors.
Addictive Behaviors | Year: 2010

Veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder are at high risk for smoking and experience difficulty with smoking cessation. We designed this clinical demonstration project to provide a low-cost, feasibly implemented smoking cessation intervention that would maximize the number of smokers who accessed the intervention. Five hundred eighty-four veteran smokers were contacted by invitational letters. Interested veterans received follow-up telephone calls using standardized scripts offering three intervention resources: 1) a referral to the National Cancer Institute's Smoking Quitline, 2) web-based counseling, and 3) local Veteran Affairs pharmacologic treatment for smoking cessation. Twenty-three percent of survey recipients participated in the clinical program. Two months after these resources were offered by phone, follow-up phone calls indicated that 25% of participants providing follow-up information reported maintaining smoking abstinence. This clinical demonstration project was associated with a 2.6% impact (i.e., reach [31.1% of smokers accessed intervention] by efficacy [8.4% of those accessing intervention quit]), meaning that 2.6% of the total number of targeted smokers reported 8 week abstinence. Results suggested that this brief, low-cost intervention was feasible and promoted smoking cessation in veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd.


Zaborowski D.E.,Duke University | Dedert E.A.,Duke University | Dedert E.A.,Veterans Affairs VISN 6 Mental Illness Research | Dedert E.A.,Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center | And 14 more authors.
Journal of Addiction Medicine | Year: 2011

Objective: The purpose of this clinical demonstration project was to increase the reach of effective treatments, such as pharmacotherapy and telephone or web-based support, by offering these treatments in a low cost and convenient manner to a population of Veterans. Methods: Six hundred nine veteran smokers who had served in the military since September 11, 2001 were contacted by invitational letters. Veterans indicating interest in further contacts received telephone calls using standardized scripts that offered referral to the National Cancer Institute's Smoking QuitLine, web-based counseling, and local Department of Veteran Affairs pharmacologic treatment for smoking cessation. Results: Seven percent of survey recipients participated in the clinical program. At follow-up, 23% of participants providing follow- up information reported maintaining smoking abstinence. This clinical demonstration project was associated with a reach of 8.6% (number of smokers who accessed the intervention/the number of targeted smokers), an efficacy of 26% (number of abstinent smokers at follow-up/number who accessed the intervention), and a 24-hour abstinence impact rate of 2.2% (number of smokers with 24-hour abstinence/number of targeted smokers). Conclusions: Results suggested that this project enhanced access to care and promoted short-term smoking cessation in Veterans who have served since September 11. 2001. © 2011 American Society of Addiction Medicine.

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