Health and Climate Foundation

Washington, DC, United States

Health and Climate Foundation

Washington, DC, United States
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Connor S.J.,Columbia University | Omumbo J.,Columbia University | Green C.,Columbia University | Dasilva J.,WHO Africa Regional Office | And 5 more authors.
Procedia Environmental Sciences | Year: 2010

This paper describes the needs for climate risk management and information services for the health sector to serve research, educational and operational needs of ministries of health and their partners, those agencies that support broader public health service provision as well as respond to epidemics and emergencies. While climate information is considered highly relevant to helping guide improvements in public health provision, to date this information is largely underutilized. We explore some of the gaps in satisfying these needs, and we make recommendations to help fill the identified gaps. © 2010 Published by Elsevier.


Picardeau M.,Institute Pasteur Paris | Bertherat E.,World Health Organization | Jancloes M.,Health and Climate Foundation | Skouloudis A.N.,European Commission - Joint Research Center Ispra | And 2 more authors.
Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease | Year: 2014

Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonosis with a worldwide distribution but is more commonly found in impoverished populations in developing countries and tropical regions with frequent flooding. The rapid detection of leptospirosis is a critical step to effectively manage the disease and to control outbreaks in both human and animal populations. Therefore, there is a need for accurate and rapid diagnostic tests and appropriate surveillance and alert systems to identify outbreaks. This review describes current in-house methods and commercialized tests for the rapid diagnosis of acute leptospirosis. It focuses on diagnostic tests that can be performed with minimal training and limited equipment in less-developed and newly industrialized countries, particularly in resource-limited settings and with results in minutes to less than 4 hours. We also describe recent technological advances in the field of diagnostic tests that could allow for the development of innovative rapid tests in the near future. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.


Brunet G.,Environment Canada | Shapiro M.,U.S. National Center for Atmospheric Research | Shapiro M.,University of Bergen | Hoskins B.,Imperial College London | And 13 more authors.
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society | Year: 2010

Progress in long-range prediction depends on coordination of research in multimodel ensembles, in tropical convection and its interaction with the global circulation, in data assimilation, and in socio-economic applications. The four main areas of the World Weather Research Program-World Climate Research Program (WWRP-WCRP) collaboration includes seamless weather/climate prediction, including ensemble prediction systems (EPSs), multiscale organization of tropical convection and its two-way interaction with the global circulation, data assimilation for coupled models, and utilization of sub-seasonal and seasonal predictions for social and economic benefits. Data assimilation allows the diagnosis of errors while they are still small, before they interact significantly with other fields. The success of this endeavor will depend on the collaboration, commitment, excellence, and strength of the weather, climate, Earth system, and social science research communities.


PubMed | World Health Organization, Institute Pasteur Paris, Royal Tropical Institute, Health and Climate Foundation and European Commission - Joint Research Center Ispra
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Diagnostic microbiology and infectious disease | Year: 2013

Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonosis with a worldwide distribution but is more commonly found in impoverished populations in developing countries and tropical regions with frequent flooding. The rapid detection of leptospirosis is a critical step to effectively manage the disease and to control outbreaks in both human and animal populations. Therefore, there is a need for accurate and rapid diagnostic tests and appropriate surveillance and alert systems to identify outbreaks. This review describes current in-house methods and commercialized tests for the rapid diagnosis of acute leptospirosis. It focuses on diagnostic tests that can be performed with minimal training and limited equipment in less-developed and newly industrialized countries, particularly in resource-limited settings and with results in minutes to less than 4 hours. We also describe recent technological advances in the field of diagnostic tests that could allow for the development of innovative rapid tests in the near future.


Jancloes M.,Health and Climate Foundation | Anderson V.,University of Toronto | Gosselin P.,Institute National Of Sante Publique Du Quebec Et Ouranos | Mee C.,Toronto Public Health | Chong N.J.,Trinity College
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health | Year: 2015

The first World Weather Open Science Conference (WWOSC, held from 17–21 August 2014 in Montreal, Québec), provided an open forum where the experience and perspective of a variety of weather information providers and users was combined with the latest application advances in social sciences. A special session devoted to health focused on how best the most recent weather information and communication technologies (ICT) could improve the health emergency responses to disasters resulting from natural hazards. Speakers from a plenary presentation and its corresponding panel shared lessons learnt from different international multidisciplinary initiatives against weather-related epidemics, such as malaria, leptospirosis and meningitis and from public health responses to floods and heat waves such as in Ontario and Quebec, Canada. Participants could bear witness to recent progress made in the use of forecasting tools and in the application of increased spatiotemporal resolutions in the management of weather related health risks through anticipative interventions, early alert and warning and early responses especially by vulnerable groups. There was an agreement that resilience to weather hazards is best developed based on evidence of their health impact and when, at local level, there is a close interaction between health care providers, epidemiologists, climate services, public health authorities and communities. Using near real time health data (such as hospital admission, disease incidence monitoring…) combined with weather information has been recommended to appraise the relevance of decisions and the effectiveness of interventions and to make adjustments when needed. It also helps appraising how people may be more or less vulnerable to a particular hazard depending on the resilience infrastructures and services. This session was mainly attended by climate, environment and social scientists from North American and European countries. Producing a commentary appears to be an effective way to share this session’s conclusions to research institutions and public health experts worldwide. It also advocates for better linking operational research and decision making and for appraising the impact of ICT and public health interventions on health. © 2015 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.


Durski K.N.,World Health Organization | Jancloes M.,Health and Climate Foundation | Chowdhary T.,UNANGO | Bertherat E.,World Health Organization
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health | Year: 2014

Leptospirosis has emerged as a major public health problem in both animals and humans. The true burden of this epidemic and endemic disease is likely to be grossly under-estimated due to the non-specific clinical presentations of the disease and the difficulty of laboratory confirmation. The complexity that surrounds the transmission dynamics, particularly in epidemic situations, requires a coordinated, multi-disciplinary effort. Therefore, the Global Leptospirosis Environmental Action Network (GLEAN) was developed to improve global and local strategies of how to predict, prevent, detect, and intervene in leptospirosis outbreaks in order to prevent and control leptospirosis in high-risk populations. © 2014 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.


Jancloes M.,Health and Climate Foundation | Thomson M.,Columbia University | Costa M.M.,Climate Service Center | Hewitt C.,UK Met Office | And 4 more authors.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health | Year: 2014

A high level expert panel discussed how climate and health services could best collaborate to improve public health. This was on the agenda of the recent Third International Climate Services Conference, held in Montego Bay, Jamaica, 4-6 December 2013. Issues and challenges concerning a demand led approach to serve the health sector needs, were identified and analysed. Important recommendations emerged to ensure that innovative collaboration between climate and health services assist decision-making processes and the management of climate-sensitive health risk. Key recommendations included: a move from risk assessment towards risk management; the engagement of the public health community with both the climate sector and development sectors, whose decisions impact on health, particularly the most vulnerable; to increase operational research on the use of policy-relevant climate information to manage climate-sensitive health risks; and to develop in-country capacities to improve local knowledge (including collection of epidemiological, climate and socio-economic data), along with institutional interaction with policy makers. © 2014 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.


PubMed | Fudan University, Shanghai Center for Urban Environmental Meteorology and Health and Climate Foundation
Type: Journal Article | Journal: BMJ open | Year: 2014

To explore the association between weather conditions and hospital admissions for pneumonia in Shanghai.A time-series analysis was performed for a period of 4years (January 2008-December 2011). A generalised additive model was used to calculate the relative risks.Shanghai, China.All daily hospital admissions for pneumonia were obtained from the Shanghai health insurance system between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2011 (n=99403).The relationship between the mean temperature and pneumonia hospital admissions followed a V-shaped curve, with an optimum temperature (OT) at 13C. When the mean temperature was below the OT, a 1C decrease corresponded to a 4.88% (95% CI 2.71% to 7.09%) and 5.34% (95% CI 2.04% to 8.74%) increase in pneumonia hospital admissions in lag 4 using a single-day lag structure and lag 0-7 using a multiday lag structure. When the mean temperature OT, no adverse effects from the temperature on pneumonia hospital admissions were found. The magnitude of the effects of temperature varied across gender and age groups. Hospitalisations for pneumonia increased by 15.99% (95% CI 0.06% to 34.46%) in the cold period.Cold temperature may be one of the important risk factors for pneumonia hospitalisations. Prevention programmes are needed to reduce the impact of cold temperature on pneumonia hospitalisations such as developing a weather warning system within a wide public health context.


PubMed | University of Toronto, Toronto Public Health, Trinity College, Health and Climate Foundation and Institute National Of Sante Publique Du Quebec Et Ouranos
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of environmental research and public health | Year: 2015

The first World Weather Open Science Conference (WWOSC, held from 17-21 August 2014 in Montreal, Qubec), provided an open forum where the experience and perspective of a variety of weather information providers and users was combined with the latest application advances in social sciences. A special session devoted to health focused on how best the most recent weather information and communication technologies (ICT) could improve the health emergency responses to disasters resulting from natural hazards. Speakers from a plenary presentation and its corresponding panel shared lessons learnt from different international multidisciplinary initiatives against weather-related epidemics, such as malaria, leptospirosis and meningitis and from public health responses to floods and heat waves such as in Ontario and Quebec, Canada. Participants could bear witness to recent progress made in the use of forecasting tools and in the application of increased spatiotemporal resolutions in the management of weather related health risks through anticipative interventions, early alert and warning and early responses especially by vulnerable groups. There was an agreement that resilience to weather hazards is best developed based on evidence of their health impact and when, at local level, there is a close interaction between health care providers, epidemiologists, climate services, public health authorities and communities. Using near real time health data (such as hospital admission, disease incidence monitoring) combined with weather information has been recommended to appraise the relevance of decisions and the effectiveness of interventions and to make adjustments when needed. It also helps appraising how people may be more or less vulnerable to a particular hazard depending on the resilience infrastructures and services. This session was mainly attended by climate, environment and social scientists from North American and European countries. Producing a commentary appears to be an effective way to share this sessions conclusions to research institutions and public health experts worldwide. It also advocates for better linking operational research and decision making and for appraising the impact of ICT and public health interventions on health.


PubMed | Climate Service Center, Institute Catala Of Ciences Del Clima, Health and Climate Foundation, UK Met Office and 3 more.
Type: Congresses | Journal: International journal of environmental research and public health | Year: 2014

A high level expert panel discussed how climate and health services could best collaborate to improve public health. This was on the agenda of the recent Third International Climate Services Conference, held in Montego Bay, Jamaica, 4-6 December 2013. Issues and challenges concerning a demand led approach to serve the health sector needs, were identified and analysed. Important recommendations emerged to ensure that innovative collaboration between climate and health services assist decision-making processes and the management of climate-sensitive health risk. Key recommendations included: a move from risk assessment towards risk management; the engagement of the public health community with both the climate sector and development sectors, whose decisions impact on health, particularly the most vulnerable; to increase operational research on the use of policy-relevant climate information to manage climate- sensitive health risks; and to develop in-country capacities to improve local knowledge (including collection of epidemiological, climate and socio-economic data), along with institutional interaction with policy makers.

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