Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Langlois K.,Health Analysis Division | Colapinto C.K.,Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion
Health Reports | Year: 2016

Background: Although vitamin C is not produced in the body, it is important for many biochemical and physiological functions. Little is known about the current vitamin C status of Canadians. This study describes the correlates of vitamin C status in a nationally representative sample of adults. Data and methods: Data are from the 2012/2013 Canadian Health Measures Survey. Plasma vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid) concentrations were measured among a fasting subsample of respondents aged 20 to 79 (n = 1,615). Vitamin C status, prevalence of deficiency (plasma vitamin C < 11 μmol/L), and use of vitamin C-containing supplements were estimated. Multivariate regression models were used to examine associations between vitamin C status and sociodemographic characteristics, smoking, body mass index, supplement use, and consumption of fruit juice and citrus fruit. Results: The mean plasma vitamin C concentration of adults aged 20 to 79 was 53 μmol/L; fewer than 3% were vitamin C-deficient. Almost 22% took a vitamin C-containing supplement. Concentrations were lower among smokers and people who were obese, and higher among vitamin C supplement users and fruit juice and citrus fruit consumers. Multivariate models showed that supplement use was the strongest and most consistent predictor of vitamin C status; fruit juice and citrus fruit consumption were predictors only among populations with lower vitamin C concentrations (for example, smokers, obese). Interpretation: Few Canadians were vitamin C-deficient. Smokers and people with a higher BMI were most at risk of lower vitamin C concentrations; concentrations were higher among supplement users and consumers of fruit juice and citrus fruit. © Minister of Industry, 2016. Source


Garriguet D.,Health Analysis Division | Tremblay S.,Special Surveys Division at Statistics canada
Health Reports | Year: 2015

Background: Discrepancies between self-reported and objectively measured physical activity are well-known. For the purpose of validation, this study compares a new self-reported physical activity questionnaire with an existing one and with accelerometer data. Data and methods: Data collected at one site of the Canadian Health Measures Survey in 2013 were used for this validation study. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) was administered to respondents during the household interview, and the new Physical Activity for Adults Questionnaire (PAAQ) was administered during a subsequent visit to a mobile examination centre (MEC). At the MEC, respondents were given an accelerometer to wear for seven days. The analysis pertains to 112 respondents aged 18 to 79 who wore the accelerometer for 10 or more hours on at least four days. Results: Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) measured by accelerometer had higher correlation with data from the PAAQ (r = 0.44) than with data from the IPAQ (r = 0.20). The differences between accelerometer and PAAQ data were greater based on accelerometer-measured physical activity accumulated in 10-minute bouts (30-minute difference in MVPA) than on all minutes (9-minute difference). The percentages of respondents meeting the Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines were 90% based on self-reported IPAQ minutes, 70% based on all accelerometer MVPA minutes, 29% based on accelerometer MVPA minutes accumulated in 10-minute bouts, and 61% based on self-reported PAAQ minutes. Interpretation: The PAAQ demonstrated reasonable validity against the accelerometer criterion. Based on correlations and absolute differences between daily minutes of MVPA and the percentages of respondents meeting the Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines, PAAQ results were closer to accelerometer data than were the IPAQ results for the study sample and previous Statistics Canada self-reported questionnaire findings. © Minister of Industry, 2015. Source


Rotermann M.,Health Analysis Division
Health reports / Statistics Canada, Canadian Centre for Health Information = Rapports sur la santé / Statistique Canada, Centre canadien d'information sur la santé | Year: 2012

Based on data from the 2003 and 2009/2010 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), this article provides current information about the sexual behaviours and condom use of 15- to 24-year-olds and examines changes since 2003. Between 2003 and 2009/2010, the percentage of 15- to 24-year-olds who had had sexual intercourse at least once remained stable, as did the percentages who reported becoming sexually active at an early age and having multiple sexual partners. Condom use increased between 2003 and 2009/2010, particularly among people reporting that they had just one sexual partner. Source


Colley R.C.,Childrens Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute | Garriguet D.,Health Analysis Division | Janssen I.,Queens University | Craig C.L.,Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute | And 2 more authors.
Health Reports | Year: 2011

Background Rising obesity rates and declining fitness levels have increased interest in understanding what underlies these trends. This article presents the first directly measured data on physical activity and sedentary behaviour on a nationally representative sample of Canadians aged 20 to 79 years. Data and methods Data are from the 2007 to 2009 Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS). Physical activity was measured using accelerometry. Data are presented as time spent in sedentary, light, moderate and vigorous intensity movement as well as steps accumulated per day. Results An estimated 15% of Canadian adults accumulate 150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) per week; 5% accumulate 150 minutes per week as at least 30 minutes of MVPA on 5 or more days a week. Men are more active than women and MVPA declines with increasing age and adiposity. Canadian adults are sedentary for approximately 9.5 hours per day (69% of waking hours). Men accumulate an average of 9,500 steps per day and women, 8,400 steps per day. The 10,000-steps-perday target is achieved by 35% of adults. Interpretation Before the CHMS, objective measures of physical activity and sedentary behaviour were not available for a representative sample of Canadians. The findings indicate that 85% of adults are not active enough to meet Canada's new physical activity recommendation. Source


Colley R.C.,Childrens Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute | Garriguet D.,Health Analysis Division | Janssen I.,Queens University | Craig C.L.,Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute | And 2 more authors.
Health Reports | Year: 2011

Background Physical activity is an important determinant of health and fi tness. This study provides contemporary estimates of the physical activity levels of Canadians aged 6 to 19 years. Data and methods Data are from the 2007 to 2009 Canadian Health Measures Survey. The physical activity of a nationally representative sample was measured using accelerometers. Data are presented as time spent in sedentary, light, moderate and vigorous intensity movement, and in steps accumulated per day. Results An estimated 9% of boys and 4% of girls accumulate 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity on at least 6 days a week. Regardless of age group, boys are more active than girls. Canadian children and youth spend 8.6 hours per day-62% of their waking hours-in sedentary pursuits. Daily step counts average 12,100 for boys and 10,300 for girls. Interpretation Based on objective and robust measures, physical activity levels of Canadian children and youth are low. Source

Discover hidden collaborations