HDR
Omaha, NE, United States
Omaha, NE, United States

HDR, Inc. is an architectural, engineering, and consulting firm based in Omaha, Nebraska, USA. HDR has worked on projects in all 50 U.S. states and in 60 countries, including notable projects such as the Hoover Dam Bypass, Fort Belvoir Community Hospital, and the The Roslin Institute building. The firm employs 8,500 professionals representing hundreds of disciplines in the architecture, energy, federal, water resources, environmental, mining, private land development, resource management, transportation, and water markets. Wikipedia.


Time filter

Source Type

News Article | February 8, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Logitech has come out with the first ever 4K webcam with HDR support called Brio, which is seemingly targeted for the mainstream and enterprise markets, as its previous webcams were. The company has gleaned from its 20-year hardware experience and expertise and created its best webcam yet. It launches Feb. 7 for $199, which might come off as starkly alpine price point for those used to relatively cheap but decent webcams — but hold on. The high price comes with nifty and much-needed features. Firstly, Logitech has outfitted Brio with 4K recording that supports HDR, and secondly, the device comes packed with the company's RightLight features meant to greatly enhance recording in low-light situations. Those who have trouble holding video conferences in dim environments will surely appreciate the addition of HDR, as it's meant to provide a better image quality and do away with typical lighting issues tied to webcam feeds. The Brio pretty much looks like a regular webcam, replete with a glass and metal shell design. The device itself also features facial recognition via infrared technology on top of everything else. This means users can take advantage of Microsoft's windows Hello feature in Windows 10 to unlock a computer by using their face. The Brio also supports 5x digital zoom capacity, 60 fps Full HD recording, and 30 fps Ultra HD recording. There is, however, a catch. To stream Ultra HD video, the device will need to be connected to a USB 3.0 port, which supports the bandwidth needed for processing the given resolution in real time. Additionally, customers need either a desktop or a laptop that's based on Intel's seventh-generation Kaby Lake processors. The webcam also has the ability to alter the field view to three available viewing angles, making for some truly diverse and dynamic recording styles. According to Logitech, the creation of Brio was propelled by the company's intent to introduce the "Tesla of webcams," which means, presumably, that the Brio perches atop the ranks of all webcams currently out in the market, and the device's full breadth of features certainly bolster that bold description. "Logitech BRIO takes webcams to an entirely new level. It's truly an unparalleled webcam experience, whether you're using it for business video collaboration, streaming a live event, or recording professional-quality video in 4K," said Scott Wharton, Logitech Video Collaboration's general manager and VP. With YouTube now able to support 4K streaming and HDR, the Brio is poised to become one of the first webcams to utilize what is expected to be a standard streaming resolution in the near future, possibly even nearer than we think. The Brio has already managed to garner its share of accolades, being named an Innovation Award Honoree at the 2017 CES Innovation Awards. The Logitech Brio 4K Pro webcam is now available for $199 on Amazon, Best Buy, or Logitech's own site. What do you think of the Logitech Brio 4K Pro webcam? Feel free to sound off in the comments section below! © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.techradar.com

The fact that you're here, looking for the best 4K Blu-ray player right now says something about you: you're ahead of the curve. You like owning the latest and greatest technology or, if not owning, at least knowing about the best-of-the-best upcoming tech. And why shouldn't you? A day will come soon when everyone will want to watch their favorite TV shows and movies in an ultra crisp 3840 × 2160 resolution. While looking at 4K Blu-ray players this early in the game makes you somewhat of a tech Nostradamus (congrats on that by the way), manufacturers don't have the same sort of passionate drive to have the latest and greatest that you do. While most manufacturers have one or two models on the market at the moment, the list of available Ultra-HD Blu-ray players is still a fairly short list. The good news is that while there aren't many 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray players at the moment, content for these players is growing at an exponential rate. Netflix has started to film many of its shows in 4K high dynamic range, and Amazon has recently followed suit. The first batch of Ultra HD films have finally made their way to store shelves, too, and include The Martian, X-Men Days of Future Past and The Revenant. But these are just the tip of the very high-resolution iceberg. Expect to see a few dozen more of these high-capacity discs make their way to an electronics retailer near you in the coming weeks and months. One last tip before we give you our recommendations: In order to get a true 4K experience, remember that you'll need a 4K Blu-ray player, a 4K Blu-ray disc and, of course, a 4K TV in order to watch it. Don't have that last one? Check out our guide to the best 4K TV. If you don't have a 4K TV, your 4K Blu-ray player will still work, but it will only display images in 1080p. Buy a regular Blu-ray instead of a 4K version and it will still play in 3840 × 2160 resolution, but it won't be a native 4K image and will be noticeably different than had you used an Ultra HD Blu-ray. Enough with the caveats. Here are the the best 4K Blu-ray players in the world. Supported resolution: 3840 x 2160 | Smart TV: Yes | Dimensions: 430 x 61 x 199 mm | Weight: 2.3 kg | UHD Upscaling?: Yes | Wi-Fi?: Yes | 3D support?: Yes Not as sexy as the DMP-UB900 When it comes to 4K UHD image quality, the DMP-UB700 effectively sets a new benchmark for price and performance. Streaming service support, with HDR-enabled 4K Netflix, is well worth trumpeting and the player does a swell job with 24-bit audio, be it with FLAC or DSD files. We would’ve liked universal disc support, but that’s probably not going to come until Sony launches its rival 4K disc spinner. In the meantime, though, if you haven’t got the cash to drop on Panasonic’s higher-end player, this is the UHD BRP you need to audition. Supported resolution: 3840 x 2160 | Smart TV: Oppo OS | Dimensions: 16.9 x 12.2 x 3.1 inches | Weight: 9.5 pounds | UHD Upscaling?: Yes | Wi-Fi?: Yes | 3D support?: Yes The Oppo UDP-203 is the most expensive Blu-ray player on this list, but depending on your needs it might just be exactly what you're looking for. The player supports a full suite of AV formats, including the niche SACD, and features a total of three HDMI ports (one for video and audio, one for audio, and another to act as an HDMI passthrough). Unfortunately for a player that wants to offer everything the Oppo doesn't include support for streaming services such as Netflix, but if you want a premium disc player (at a premium price), this is the one for you. Supported resolution: 3840 x 2160 | Smart TV: Panasonic OS | Dimensions: 435 x 199 x 68mm | Weight: 5.29 pounds | UHD Upscaling?: Yes | Wi-Fi?: Yes | 3D support?: Yes The DMP-UB900 will restore you faith in physical media. In full 4K HDR guise it offers a level of performance that will have new 4K TV owners gasping. Ultra-HD Blu-ray brings the experience of 4K digital cinema to the home, and rewards with brilliant colour fidelity, deep contrast and almost three-dimensional clarity. Factor in solid file playback support, plus 4K iterations of Netflix and Amazon Instant Video, and you have a machine that'll make your new 4K HDR TV look sensational. Supported resolution: 3840 x 2160 | Smart TV: Samsung Smart Hub | Dimensions: 405 x 44.7 x 230 mm | Weight: 4.19 pounds | UHD Upscaling?: Yes | Wi-Fi?: Yes | 3D support?: Yes The K8500 is currently the cheapest route into 4K Blu-ray. It's also a useful hub for 4K OTT services from Netflix and Amazon, and while the design is a bit Marmite, you'll be consistently impressed by its loading speed and colourful UI. If you want your 4K HDR TV to look its best, then you can't beat 4K Blu-ray. And when it comes to sheer image fidelity, the UBD-K8500 certainly impresses. Supported resolution: 3840 x 2160 | Smart TV: New Xbox Experience | Dimensions: 17 x 11.4 x 4.4 inches | Weight: N/A | UHD Upscaling?: Yes | Wi-Fi?: Yes | 3D support?: Yes Not holding the title of a "proper Blu-ray player" doesn't stop the Xbox One S from being a great, cheap way to play 4K Blu-ray discs. Sporting a Blu-ray disc drive and the capacity to run Netflix in 4K Ultra-HD, Microsoft's latest iteration of the Xbox is about as forward-thinking as you can get.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.gizmag.com

A spec-by-spec look at the LG G6 against the Google Pixel XL The LG G6 is the smaller device overall. The Pixel XL is about 4-percent taller and 5-percent wider, though it is also a little thinner. Both devices are built from glass and aluminum, but with a different approach. The G6 has a glass front and back with a thin curved aluminum frame holding it together. The Pixel is mostly aluminum. Its metal unibody is similar to an iPhone's, but it has a glass accent portion on its upper back panel. There are three colors for the G6, but the white variant will not be available in the US. The Pixel's blue option is probably the most adventurous of the bunch. The G6 has an impressive screen-to-device ratio, fitting a slightly-larger screen on a smaller machine. Its display also has a unique 18:9 (or 2:1) aspect ratio, making it taller and thinner than most. (The 16:9 ratio is nearly ubiquitous in smartphones.) We certainly don't have any complaints about the Pixel XL's excellent display, but on paper, the G6 could give it a run for its money. The G6 has slightly higher resolution and meets Dolby Vision and HDR 10 standards. The G6's rear camera has dual lenses: One is standard, and the other is a wide angle lens. You can toggle between the standard and wide angle lenses to fit more or less into the frame. The Pixel's camera is impressive, but it doesn't pack a second lens of any kind. The aperture on the G6 is slightly larger than the Google Pixel's. We have yet to meaningfully test the G6's camera, but we expect that it will take better low-light pictures than its G5 predecessor. The G6 has optical image stabilization, a bit of camera engineering meant to reduce blur from camera shake. OIS is missing from the Pixel, but to be fair, we still consider its camera one of the best. The Pixel has a slightly larger battery capacity, but a number of factors go into overall battery life. We'll conduct our standard test on the G6 when we get our hands on one for a full-length review. Both phones offer some form of fast charging, but with different standards. The G6 supports Qualcomm's Quick Charge 3.0, but the Pixel uses USB-C quick charging. Google claims you can get up to 7 hours of use from 15 minutes of charging. For a few months after its release, the Google Pixel and Pixel XL were the only phones with Google Assistant built-in. But the G6 will also have Google Assistant from the get-go, and we expect it to come to more of this year's Android flagships as well.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

Mobile World Congress – the showcase of the most cutting-edge technology on the planet – is in full swing in Barcelona this week. Phones, wearables and everything else with a microchip is showing off fantastic new features. But all anyone really seems interested in is a remake of a phone from 17 years ago, the Nokia 3310. There are a few ways to look at the Nokia 3310. It could just be a marketing ploy, or a Hollywood-esque remake because the industry has run out of ideas. Or maybe it’s trying to tap into the feeling that modern life is too connected, harking back to a simpler time. But whatever you think the Nokia 3310 is, it tells us something interesting about the state of the smartphone industry in 2017. “It’s an absolutely damning indictment of the state of the smartphone market that the world is so excited and obsessed with a retro feature phone that shipped 17 years ago,” said Ben Wood, chief of research at CCS Insight. He’s right. Launched in the centre of what should be the most exciting technology fair on the planet, a so-called dumbphone, or more kindly a “feature phone”, is all anyone’s interested in. And the truth is the new Nokia 3310 isn’t actually anything special. Nokia dumbphones just like it have been made for years – take the Nokia 105, which has even been made by three separate companies: first Nokia outright, then Microsoft when it bought Nokia phones, and now HMD Global, the firm that has licensed the Nokia brand name. If HMD had simply pushed out what we now know as the new 3310 as the new Nokia 230, would anyone have batted an eyelid? But with the right brand name and model number, HMD has reinvigorated a classic that has the developed world buzzing. So why does a nostalgia trip like the 3310 take the spotlight when Sony launched a phone with a 4K HDR screen, LG’s G6 is “made for split-screen apps”, Huawei’s P10 has a fancy Leica dual-camera setup, and there’s even a new BlackBerry with a keyboard and everything? Perhaps it’s because smartphones are boring now. It’s not because they aren’t marvellous machines that have become central to our lives, but they’re all much of a muchness. One smartphone is the same as the next. It has a camera, a screen, it plays music, runs apps and games, shoves the internet in the palm of your hand and forms a conduit for all your life to flow through. But if you broke it and bought a new one, it would do more or less exactly the same, perhaps in a dazzling new colour. It’s not only that smartphone manufacturers are struggling to differentiate between each other, it’s also that each iteration of a Sony, an Apple, a Huawei or a Samsung smartphone looks pretty much the same as the last one. Francisco Jeronimo, research director for European mobile devices at research firm IDC, said: “We’ve got to a point where improving phones by creating megapixel increases in the camera or improvements in the screen is a lot harder than it was five years ago.” The big leaps in technological advancement are mostly behind us. There is only so much you can do to a smartphone that already does it all. Jeronimo explains: “We’ve got to such quality in the devices that we’ve started hitting the physical limits, which means most of the innovation going forwards is likely to be in software, voice, your interaction with the phone and its services, to make the smartphone much smarter than it is today.” The one primary feature left open for obvious innovation is within screen design, and that’s where the envelope is being pushed this year. The holy grail of an all-screen phone will be the biggest change in design since the phablet came along. According to Jeronimo and others talking behind the scenes at MWC, including people talking privately to the Guardian, Samsung’s Galaxy S8 with its new “infinity display” is likely to represent the biggest change in phone hardware design in the last three years. But even the all-screen sci-fi dream may not be enough. People will buy new phones in their millions, of course, but they’re not going to be excited about their third, fourth or fifth smartphone that looks just like the old one. Once manufacturers have completed their bezel-less transformations, where do you go with a phone that’s already all-screen? Bendable, fold-out or roll up phones, perhaps, or will the next big leap be holographic? In the meantime Amazon, Google and many others are betting on voice. But voice assistants in their most advanced forms are less of a smartphone feature and more of a technology delivered by the smartphone. So perhaps that’s it for major smartphone innovation. Maybe they’re destined to be relegated to commodity items. The new PC for the post-PC era; the beige box for the 21st century.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.techradar.com

Mobile World Congress is here once again and that can only mean one thing: it’s time for the TechRadar MWC awards. Less glamorous but more accurate than the recent Oscars, these are the awards all the top tech firms attending the show in Barcelona want to get their hands on. This year in particular was hotly contested and our team of TechRadar judges spent hours deliberating to make sure the best products on show at this marquee mobile event got the recognition they deserve. Our Reader's Choice also gave you the chance to vote for your favorites at this year's MWC - so here's who emerged victorious. "2017 was a special year for the TechRadar Awards at MWC 2017, as it was the first time we saw such a spread of choice in the top categories," said TechRadar's Global Phones, Tablets and Wearables Editor, Gareth Beavis. "LG impressed us all with its rebooted design and more sensible feature set, but combining it with an eye-catching display on the front that will be a useful weapon in the fight with Samsung and Apple. "The Sony Xperia XZ Premium was also an impressive phone that shows Sony still knows how to make a great device. Samsung's tablets impressed as we finally got the rebooted Galaxy Tab we've been expecting, and the Huawei Watch followed the welcome trend of more sporty smartwatches as consumers look to get fitter with wrist-based tech." We were impressed by the original Huawei Watch,, so the pressure was on for the Huawei Watch 2. Fortunately it's lived up to our expectations, as it's gone for a more sporty look than its sleek predecessor, which could be divisive. However, it's also lighter and packing more than enough significant new features to make it an appealing option for anyone looking to move into the second generation of Android Wear. This hearable is still in the concept stages but we were impressed to see Sony working on a wearable that not only looks good but has the potential to be really useful. We're excited to see more. You were all clearly as impressed with the new Sony flagship's 4K HDR screen tech as we were – it came out on top in our Reader's Choice poll. Taking second place in our Reader's Choice poll is the winner of our Best Phone and Best in Show categories, the LG G6. Samsung has lifted the award for best tablet thanks to its new addition to the Galaxy Tab family. A solidly-designed tablet that comes bundled with the new S pen, it's the Android alternative to the iPad Pro. Samsung has come in strong with the tablets at this year's show. The Galaxy Book looks set to be a refined and improved Tab Pro S, and with a bundled S Pen and keyboard, combined with the smart Samsung Flow, this was a tablet that impressed the judges. With the G6, LG has dialed back the innovation and created a solid smartphone that takes things back to basics and does them well. It's in a strong position to perform well in the 2017 smartphone wars, and the 18:9 ratio display dominates the front of the phone to look really impressive the second you lay eyes on it. A phone that offers fantastic all round value, the Moto G5 Plus is only going to improve Motorola's already good reputation in the budget phone market. It combines strong specs with an attractive metal body to bring exceptional value to the market. Once again, Motorola has served up another budget winner... and it just keeps getting better year on year as cutting-edge features filter down. A double award for LG in 2017 at the TechRadar awards, with that huge display and refined design making it a firm favorite and an easy winner this year.  After the less-than-stellar performance of last year's G5 we were hoping LG would deliver a more refined mobile experience, and with this rebooted G6 it's done just that. Sony has created a phone with great potential, one that makes the most of its huge screen with 4K and HDR capabilities. This powerful handset - one of the first to launch with a Snapdragon 835 chipset - has some of the most advanced screen technology on any smartphone and that deserves recognition. It's also going to be one of the fastest at downloading, with the capability of sucking down 1Gbps of data on the go. That means the buffer bar should be a thing of the past if you're on the right network.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.gizmag.com

Keep in mind that these opinions are based on what we know so far – info from official spec sheets and a few brief hands-on encounters, along with industry-wide observations. It's entirely possible that our summations take on a different direction once we conduct full-length reviews of key products. We're giving the Moto G5 and G5 Plus top billing based on our confident hunch that they represent the best value. Motorola seems to share our priorities for what we want in a mid-ranger: Nixing poorly executed bells and whistles in favor of maintaining a robust and well-made device that's decent-looking to boot. The new LG G6 breaks away from the previous generation with a nearly bezel-free display with an excellent look and feel. The 2,880 x 1,440 pixel, 5.7-inch display is bigger than that of the iPhone 7 Plus or Pixel XL, yet the G6 is a smaller phone overall. We're also looking forward to putting its dual-lens camera to the test. The G6 combines standard and wide-angle lenses so you can choose to fit more or less into the camera frame (similar to last year's G5 and V20). The G6 also boasts other niceties like microSD expansion, IP68 water resistance and a capacious 3,300mAh battery. LG has yet to confirm pricing and availability, but this is one of the few high-end phones to come out of MWC. Expect it to be priced accordingly. The XZ Premium is Sony's newest offering its Xperia line. We award it points for its 4K HDR display, high-end internals (headlined by a new Snapdragon 835 CPU and 4 GB RAM) and for maintaining the line's characteristic stylish flair. That being said, Sony reaches for the stars in a few areas that we aren't sure are worthwhile. The XZ Premium also promises a "super slow motion video" mode that records at 960 frames-per-second, which is unheard of in a smartphone camera. Extra memory built into the camera is supposed to prevent lag when shooting in this mode, but we weren't able to test it ourselves: The units at MWC were either behind glass or switched off. So there's reason to remain skeptical about its delivery, as well as the fun and utility of super-slow-mo on a smartphone in general. Sony also announced mid-ranged counterparts to the XZ Premium: the XA1, the XA1 Ultra and the XZs. Of these, we only had hands-on time with the XA1, which seemed to showcase the Xperia line's solid craftsmanship (and rocks thin bezels, which are very of-the-moment, on its 5-inch display). Its larger counterpart, the XA1 Ultra, has a 6-inch display. Both XA1s have a whopping 23-pixel rear camera, but megapixels alone do not an excellent smartphone camera make. The XZs, on the other hand, seem to be less powerful versions of the XZ Premium, but with similar camera tricks. Huawei's P10 and P10 Plus are a bit off of our radar, purely because there are no plans for a US release. Still, it's worth keeping tabs on this industry giant – it's the third largest smartphone maker in the world, and its P10 and P10 Plus pack in some considerable tech. Huawei gave color center stage at its MWC event, showcasing a number of color variants for the P10 and enlisting the help of Pantone to extol the virtues of its new green and blue offerings. But Huawei hasn't ignored internals – the P10s also include Ultra Memory technology meant to use RAM more efficiently, as well as a promisingly speedy Huawei-made Kirin 960 chip. No, we're not including the reintroduced Nokia 3310 in our roundup of MWC's most promising phones, though there were plenty of reasons to appreciate the original piece of turn-of-the-century tech. We're looking past that hit of nostalgia to concentrate on where HMD Global is going with the Nokia brand. So far, the Nokia seems to be taking a strong middle-of-the-road path with its three different flagships. The Nokia 6, 5 and 3 (listed by descending order of price) seem to share a refreshing dedication to a clutter-free pure Android experience, but vary in build quality, camera and internals. Its highest-end phone, the Nokia 6, puts a mid-tier Snapdragon 430 processor in an interesting build carved from a solid block of aluminum. Nokia 6 has already been introduced to China, but at MWC, the company announced that there will be an international version as well. We're still waiting for HMD/Nokia to confirm which of these options will be available to US consumers, and when. The BlackBerry KeyOne layers the physical QWERTY keyboard that was so well-loved in the pre-iPhone days onto a decently-specced Android-running machine. On one hand, we're enthusiastic about increased variety in the smartphone market, which can feel rather homogenous. On the other hand, we're not sure if this is a promising reboot or just a reactionary attempt at innovation.


News Article | February 5, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Nvidia unveiled the 2017 version of its Shield Android TV during CES 2017, and people were quite impressed with the technical specifications of the product. The company even advertised the streaming apparatus as a gamechanger with powerful capabilities. Critics were also impressed with the Nvidia Shield TV when it came to streaming shows and games, especially with 4K, HDR graphics, as well as its new game controller and remote control. However, the $100 difference between the standard Shield TV and the Pro version may leave interested buyers to question just how huge the difference is between the standard and Pro version. Both versions are streaming beasts with 4K HRD video capacity, has access to infinite apps and entertainment as well as NVIDIA-powered gaming in the cloud or from your local computer so it may be a tough decision for some. Luckily, Tech Times is here to help you sort it out. Let's get the expense out of the way. The basic Shield package will cost people $199.99 while the Shield Pro will set you back $299.99. Both packages come with the Shield unit, charger, game controller, and remote control. That is a $100 difference that is easily justifiable by looking through the technical specifications of the devices in the package so let's take a look at what could tip the scales for you. What could be so different between the two Shield devices to warrant a $100 difference, you might ask. Well, one of the biggest factors is the internal storage of the devices. The basic Shield unit has a 16 GB and two USB 3.0 ports and that's about it. The Shield Pro has a 500 GB internal memory as well as a microSD card slot for memory expansion, which is really good for those who like having their games and content readily available in their device. There is, however, a trick to expanding the capacity of the standard Shield device which we detailed in a previous Tips & Tricks article. First off, interested buyers should know that there is quite a difference in size between the two units. The more basic Shield has a 98 mm x 159 mm height and width, 25.93 mm thick and weighs in at 250 grams. The photo below shows the Shield unit's size compared to its accessories. The Shield Pro is physically bigger with a 130 mm x 210 mm height and width and a thickness of 210 mm. It weighs in at 654 grams. Here is the Shield Pro unit beside its accessories. There are two main differences between the remote controls for the two packages. Basically, the 16 GB Shield package comes with a newly designed remote control without the earphone jack but is equipped with an IR blaster which would allow user to control not only the Shield device but the televisions too. The 500 GB Shield Pro retains the old design so, while it has an earphone jack, it does not have the IR blaster. Then again, the remote control can be bought separately at $49.99 so it's up to you if you'd rather just buy a new remote control. The "special" features are really just more ports because, with the standard Shield package, users only get 2 USB 3.0 ports and an HDMI port for connecting to the television. The Shield Pro offers the following ports: HDMI, MicroSD card slot, 2 USB 3.0, 1 Micro-USB 2.0, and an IR receiver that is compatible with Logitech Harmony. If you want convenience and have enough money to shell out, we suggest going for Shield Pro since it has a lot more to offer. However, if you're the type who doesn't mind doing a little extra work to get more storage, the standard 16 GB Shield package is not a bad choice at all. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.cnet.com

The next Apple TV could finally get a feature that's been available on competing devices for almost two years. That feature is 4K resolution output, also known as Ultra High Definition, which would likely allow the device to stream the highest-quality video available from services like Netflix and YouTube to compatible 4K TVs. A new Apple TV box with 4K and "more vivid colors" will be available "as soon as this year," according to Bloomberg. An Apple representative declined to comment on the report. 4K video streams from services like Netflix, Amazon, YouTube and Vudu have been available for years. Netflix was the first to debut 4K streaming in April 2014, followed by Amazon and YouTube in 2015. They deliver improved video quality compared to standard high-definition streams. The quality improvement is often tough to discern in our testing, however, and to see it at all requires a 4K TV. 4K also requires a relatively fast internet connection and, in some cases like Netflix, a more expensive subscription tier. Despite its relatively high price of $150, the current Apple TV doesn't offer 4K video, an omission we noted in our review when the device debuted in October 2015. That was five months after the introduction of the first 4K streaming device, the original Nvidia Shield. Since then numerous 4K-capable competitors have hit the market, including the $60 Chromecast Ultra, the $80 Roku Premiere and the $100 Amazon Fire TV. Most 4K TVs also have 4K-capable apps. The following is my speculation based on the unconfirmed report cited above, so take it with a grain of salt. Apple's iTunes video service currently lacks 4K movies and TV shows, which are available from competitors such as Google Play, Vudu and Amazon. Since none of those services are currently available on the Apple TV, it makes sense that Apple will also debut 4K stuff on iTunes when (and if) the new 4K-capable box hits the market. Since many streaming services, TVs and competing devices offer high dynamic range (HDR) video, which in our tests often delivers a more noticeable improvement than 4K resolution, it's likely that the new Apple TV will too. "More vivid colors" could refer to the wide color gamut used by most HDR video. And what about price? One big criticism of the Apple TV is its high cost compared to competitors. If Apple really wants the device to take off, I think it should price it at $100. Perhaps Apple will provide more information on June 5, the opening day of its annual World Wide Developers' Conference.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.techradar.com

It's been the glaring omission on the Apple TV spec sheet for years, but a new report suggests a 4K Apple TV may finally be in the works. That's according to long-time Apple tipster Mark Gurman, reporting for Bloomberg that "people familiar with the matter" have revealed a "renewed focus" on the Cupertino company's set-top box. Potentially ready for release as soon as this year, the box is currently said to be in testing under the codename "J105", and will support ultra-high definition 4K streaming – potentially even HDR content, given the mention of "vivid colors" in the report. The renewed interest in the Apple TV comes in the wake of the appointment of former Amazon Fire TV executive Timothy D. Twerdhal. Apple has lost ground to its Amazon rival, as its drive for greater margins pushes hardware costs high, with Amazon preferring to make its money back through services. It's an interesting, if somewhat surprising, position from Apple given the success or its smartphone App Store, and one that has seemingly alienated the staff it has working on the Apple TV product. According to the Bloomberg report, there are grumbles among staff who had hoped to make a "revolutionary" device, but "got evolutionary." Still, there's some hope that previous rumored features may yet make a return. Apple TV has long been linked with a cable TV service from Apple – while that full-fat approach may never see the light of day, a web-based, channel-by-channel subscription service could still appear with the arrival of Twerdhal and his predecessor hammering out content deals.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

My Free Photos To You have launched a new photography website. This new site focuses on photography news and provides photography tips as well as a selection of free stock photos. For more information please visit: https://myfreephotostoyou.com. My Free Photos To You is a newly launched photography based website aimed at fans of photography. The site provides something for everyone whether they are a beginner or a professional photographer or just fans of good photographic images. The site offers free stock photograph packs and free HDR images for people to enjoy and use. The free stock photo images include flowers, plants, cars and vegetables. The free HDR images consist of extremely good quality images of wildlife, mountains scenes, waterfalls, roads and plants. These images show what can be achieved with photography skills. A selection of reports are available on the site giving photography hints and tips to readers. The latest tips report is about wildlife photography for travellers. The report gives readers four top pieces of advice when trying to capture wildlife including carrying the appropriate equipment, as carrying a good quality zoom lens is half the battle done. They also recommend knowing their subjects well, being aware of location and framing and finally, being patient. There is also a news section on the site providing information of what is happening currently in the world of photography. One of the latest stories on the site is about a photographer who recently captured images of an isolated Amazon tribe in a remote region of Brazil. Other news includes includes the latest in new cameras and lenses available. My Free Photos To You are currently offering a photography ebook free to download. Digital Photography Mastery is about learning how to start a digital photography business and is available to instantly download with no sign ups needed. Those wishing to find out more can visit the website on the link provided above. For more information, please visit https://www.myfreephotostoyou.com/

Loading HDR collaborators
Loading HDR collaborators