Hawkins Inc.

Minneapolis, MN, United States

Hawkins Inc.

Minneapolis, MN, United States
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Porto-Fett A.C.S.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Campano S.G.,Hawkins Inc. | Smith J.L.,Oser Technologies | Oser A.,Oser Technologies | And 3 more authors.
Meat Science | Year: 2010

Viability of Listeria monocytogenes was monitored on frankfurters formulated with or without potassium lactate and sodium diacetate at a ratio of ca. 7:1 and treated with lauric arginate (LAE; 22 or 44 ppm) using the Sprayed Lethality in Container (SLIC®) delivery method. Without antimicrobials, pathogen numbers remained relatively constant at ca. 3.3 log CFU/package for ca. 30 d, but then increased to ca. 8.4 log CFU/package over 120 d. Regardless of whether or not lactate and diacetate were included, when treated with LAE, pathogen numbers decreased from ca. 3.3 log CFU/package to ca. 1.5 log CFU/package within 2 h, but then increased to 7.3 and 6.7 log CFU/package, respectively, after 120 d. When frankfurters were formulated with lactate and diacetate and treated with LAE, pathogen numbers decreased by ca. 2.0 log CFU/package within 2 h and remained relatively unchanged over the 120 d. These data confirm that LAE provides an initial lethality towards L. monocytogenes and when used in combination with reduced levels/ratio of lactate and diacetate as an ingredient for frankfurters provides inhibition throughout shelf life.


Luchansky J.B.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Campano S.G.,Hawkins Inc. | Shoyer B.A.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Porto-Fett A.C.S.,U.S. Department of Agriculture
Journal of Food Protection | Year: 2016

Viability of Listeria monocytogenes was monitored during refrigerated (48C) and/or frozen (i.e., deep chilling at -2.28C) storage on casing-cooked hams that were commercially prepared with and without potassium lactate and sodium diacetate (1.6%), buffered vinegar (2.2%), buffered vinegar and potassium lactate (1.7%), or a blend of potassium lactate, potassium acetate, and sodium diacetate (1.7%). A portion of these hams were subsequently surface treated with lauric arginate ester (LAE; 44 ppm). In phase I, hams (ca. 3.5 kg each) were sliced (ca. 0.7 cm thick, ca. 100 g), inoculated (ca. 4.0 log CFU per slice), surface treated with LAE, and stored at either 48C for 120 days or at-2.28C for 90 days and then at 48C for an additional 120 days. In phase I, without antimicrobials, the population of L. monocytogenes increased by ca. 5.9 log CFU per slice within 120 days at 48C; however, pathogen levels increased only slightly (ca. 0.45 log CFU per slice) for hams formulated with potassium lactate and sodium diacetate and decreased by ca. 1.2 log CFU per slice when formulated with the other antimicrobials. For slices held at -2.28C and then stored at 48C, but not treated with LAE, L. monocytogenes increased by ca. 4.5 log CFU per slice for controls, whereas when formulated with antimicrobials, pathogen levels decreased by ca. 1.4 to 1.8 log CFU per slice. For product treated with LAE, L. monocytogenes increased by ca. 4.0 log CFU per slice for controls, whereas when formulated with antimicrobials, pathogen levels decreased by ca. 0.9 to 1.9 log CFU per slice. In phase II, whole hams (ca. 1.0 kg each) containing antimicrobials were inoculated (6.8 log CFU per ham) and then stored at -2.28C for 6 months. Pathogen levels decreased by ca. 2.0 to 3.5 log CFU per ham (without LAE treatment) and by ca. 4.2 to 5.2 log CFU per ham (with application of LAE via Sprayed Lethality in Container) when product was held at-2.28C. In general, deep chilling hams was listericidal, and inclusion of antimicrobials in theformulation suppressed outgrowth of L. monocytogenes during extended cold storage.


PubMed | Hawkins Inc. and U.S. Department of Agriculture
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Journal of food protection | Year: 2016

Viability of Listeria monocytogenes was monitored during refrigerated (4C) and/or frozen (i.e., deep chilling at -2.2C) storage on casing-cooked hams that were commercially prepared with and without potassium lactate and sodium diacetate (1.6%), buffered vinegar (2.2%), buffered vinegar and potassium lactate (1.7%), or a blend of potassium lactate, potassium acetate, and sodium diacetate (1.7%). A portion of these hams were subsequently surface treated with lauric arginate ester (LAE; 44 ppm). In phase I, hams (ca. 3.5 kg each) were sliced (ca. 0.7 cm thick, ca. 100 g), inoculated (ca. 4.0 log CFU per slice), surface treated with LAE, and stored at either 4C for 120 days or at -2.2C for 90 days and then at 4C for an additional 120 days. In phase I, without antimicrobials, the population of L. monocytogenes increased by ca. 5.9 log CFU per slice within 120 days at 4C; however, pathogen levels increased only slightly (ca. 0.45 log CFU per slice) for hams formulated with potassium lactate and sodium diacetate and decreased by ca. 1.2 log CFU per slice when formulated with the other antimicrobials. For slices held at -2.2C and then stored at 4C, but not treated with LAE, L. monocytogenes increased by ca. 4.5 log CFU per slice for controls, whereas when formulated with antimicrobials, pathogen levels decreased by ca. 1.4 to 1.8 log CFU per slice. For product treated with LAE, L. monocytogenes increased by ca. 4.0 log CFU per slice for controls, whereas when formulated with antimicrobials, pathogen levels decreased by ca. 0.9 to 1.9 log CFU per slice. In phase II, whole hams (ca. 1.0 kg each) containing antimicrobials were inoculated (6.8 log CFU per ham) and then stored at -2.2C for 6 months. Pathogen levels decreased by ca. 2.0 to 3.5 log CFU per ham (without LAE treatment) and by ca. 4.2 to 5.2 log CFU per ham (with application of LAE via Sprayed Lethality in Container) when product was held at -2.2C. In general, deep chilling hams was listericidal, and inclusion of antimicrobials in the formulation suppressed outgrowth of L. monocytogenes during extended cold storage.


Bradley E.M.,Mississippi State University | Williams J.B.,Mississippi State University | Schilling M.W.,Mississippi State University | Coggins P.C.,Mississippi State University | And 3 more authors.
Meat Science | Year: 2011

Sodium lactate and acetic acid derivatives were evaluated for their effects on color retention, microbial growth, and sensory attributes of hot-boned pork sausage patties. Treatments included: (a) sodium lactate (L), (b) buffered vinegar (V), (c) sodium lactate and vinegar mixture (LV), (d) control with BHA/BHT (C), and (e) negative control (NC). Treatments L and LV decreased TPC at day 14 and day 16 when compared to control samples and reduced bacterial numbers up to 18. days. In addition, use of lactate and vinegar increased (P < 0.05) acceptability and juiciness and reduced (P < 0.05) off-flavor and rancidity when compared to control treatments at day 14. These results revealed that the L and LV sausage patties retained sensory acceptability and shelf-life quality from day 14 through day 17 as opposed to other treatments. Additionally, sausage patties with LV maintained redness and sensory quality throughout 17. days of shelf-life, as compared to other treatments that retained color and quality for 14. days. © 2010 The American Meat Science Association.


Desai M.A.,Mississippi State University | Kurve V.,Mississippi State University | Smith B.S.,Hawkins Inc. | Campano S.G.,Hawkins Inc. | And 2 more authors.
Poultry Science | Year: 2014

Poultry processors commonly place whole parts of broilers in plastic packages and seal them in an atmosphere of 100% carbon dioxide before shipping them to food service and retail customers. This practice extends the shelf life of retail cuts to approximately 12 d under refrigerated conditions. The objective of this study was to determine the antimicrobial efficacy of vinegar for growth inhibition of mesophilic and lactic acid bacterial counts and enhancement of shelf life in CO2-packaged refrigerated chicken thigh samples. Meat quality, sensory differences, and microbial enumeration were evaluated for chicken thighs that were sprayed with 0, 0.5, or 1.0% vinegar. No differences were observed (P > 0.05) among treatments (control vs. 0.5 and 1.0% vinegar-treated chicken thighs) with respect to pH and Commission Internationale d'Eclairage L a b for both chicken skin and the meat tissue. The difference from the control test indicated that trained panelists were not able to detect a difference (P > 0.05) in flavor between the chicken thigh treatments. The mesophilic and Lactobacillus bacterial counts were enumerated after 0, 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 d of storage. The mesophilic bacterial load for the 1.0% vinegar treatment was less than all other treatments after 8, 12, 16, and 20 d of storage, whereas the 0.5% vinegar treatment had lower bacterial counts at d 12 than both controls and had an approximate shelf life of 16 d. For lactic acid bacteria, the vinegar 1.0% treatment had lower counts than the control treatments at d 12 and 16. The results from the study indicate that a combination of 1.0% vinegar with CO2 packaging can extend the shelf life from 12 to 20 d for chicken retail cuts without negatively affecting the quality and sensory properties of the broiler meat. © 2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.


Trademark
Hawkins Inc. | Date: 2012-04-24

Chemicals and antimicrobial substances, namely, chemical preparations for scientific preparations for inhibiting pathogens used for the preservation of food products.


Trademark
Hawkins Inc. | Date: 2015-10-12

Beer, ale, lager, stout and porter.


Patent
Hawkins Inc. | Date: 2015-09-02

Embodiments herein relate to animal feed preservatives including byproducts containing levulinic acid and methods of making and using the same. In an embodiment, a method of making an animal feed preservative is included. The method can include obtaining an acidic byproduct of a manufacturing process. The acidic byproduct can include at least about 1% by weight levulinic acid or a salt thereof. The method can further include mixing the acidic byproduct with a base to form the animal feed preservative. The animal feed preservative can include at least about 5 wt. % of the acid byproduct. In various embodiments, a method of reducing the amount of mycotoxins formed in an animal feed product during storage is included. In various embodiments, an animal feed preservative or supplement is included. Other embodiments are also included herein.


Patent
Hawkins Inc. | Date: 2010-10-28

The invention relates to systems and methods for maintaining the concentration of a brine solution used in meat processing. In an embodiment, a method includes measuring a concentration property of brine solution in a reservoir with a sensor; supplying data regarding the concentration property of the brine solution to a controller; removing diluted brine solution from the reservoir when the controller determines that the concentration property falls below a defined set point; adding a liquid composition comprising greater than about 50 wt. % of a potassium phosphate salt to the reservoir from a phosphate solution supply tank when the controller determines that the concentration property falls below a defined set point; and replenishing the phosphate solution supply tank by adding a liquid phosphate salt composition having a consistent concentration to the phosphate solution supply tank. Other embodiments are included herein.


PubMed | Kansas State University, Hawkins Inc. and Mississippi State University
Type: | Journal: Meat science | Year: 2016

Dry-cured hams may become infested with ham mites, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, during the aging process. Methyl bromide is the only known available fumigant pesticide that is effective at controlling ham mite infestations in dry cured ham plants. However, methyl bromide will be phased out of all industries as early as 2015 due to its status as an ozone-depleting substance. Research was conducted to develop and evaluate the potential of using food-grade film coatings to control mite infestations, without affecting the aging process and sensory properties of the dry-cured hams. Cubes coated with xanthan gum+20% propylene glycol and carrageenan/propylene glycol alginate+10% propylene glycol were effective at controlling mite infestations under laboratory conditions. Water vapor permeability was measured to estimate the impact of coatings during the aging process. It was evident that carrageenan/propylene glycol alginate coatings were permeable to moisture, which potentially makes them usable during aging.

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