Hawaiian Electric Company

Honolulu, HI, United States

Hawaiian Electric Company

Honolulu, HI, United States

Hawaiian Electric Industries Inc.. is the largest supplier of electricity in the state of Hawaii, supplying power to 95% of Hawaii's population through its electric utilities: Hawaiian Electric Company, Inc., Hawaii Electric Light Company, Inc. and Maui Electric Company, Limited. In addition, HEI owns a financial institution serving Hawaii, American Savings Bank. HECO, HELCO, and MECO employ more than 2,000 people. Approximately 20,000 Hawaii residents are shareholders of HECO’s parent company, Hawaiian Electric Industries . The company is headquartered in Honolulu. The net income of the company reached 164 million dollars by the end of 2012 with a yearly revenue of 3.4 billion dollars. Wikipedia.


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News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

On May 1-2, more than 1,000 students, educators, industry partners and community leaders throughout the state and the nation gathered for the 8th Annual Hawaii STEM Conference – an empowering STEM event dedicated to engaging a new generation of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) innovators in Hawaii. Presented by Maui Economic Development Board’s (MEDB) Women in Technology (WIT) project, the conference was held for the first time at the Hawaii Convention Center on Oahu. This year’s theme, “Download Knowledge. Upload Service,” invited students to demonstrate and showcase the skills and abilities they have gained to help create a thriving future, not only for Hawaii, but the world. Students and teachers representing intermediate and high schools from every island across the state of Hawaii participated in this regional technology conference which featured 40+ student breakout sessions, 30+ teacher breakout sessions, 14 software competitions, a STEM playground, a formal awards banquet (“The STEMMYS), and exhibit presentations. During the conference, Hawaii State Governor David Ige announced the offering of a Digital Alliance program for high school students across the State of Hawaii in the summer of 2018. A partnership between Microsoft, Maui Economic Development Board’s Women in Technology Project (WIT) and the State of Hawaii; the Digital Alliance program will provide students with the knowledge and skills to succeed in computer science and/or in any STEM-related careers. The program is designed to promote critical and creative thinking; encourage collaboration with other students; and intersect with industry professionals in various Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) fields. “Microsoft has done so much in our community and they are committed to assuring that many of you will have access to a lot of the great technology that is really defining the future for all of us,” said Hawaii State Governor David Ige. “And so the Maui Economic Development Board, State of Hawaii and Microsoft have formed a Digital Alliance partnership because we do understand that software development and access to the latest and greatest software tools gives our young people opportunities to explore all of these technologies. In today’s world anything can be done anywhere and it really is about who is brave enough to take it on and solve our world’s challenges.” While this year’s conference excelled in engaging students and educators on a myriad of hands-on STEM activities, competitions, and access to the latest technologies; it was the overarching mission of the state’s largest STEM conference that brought home the true impact of STEM education. According to Leslie Wilkins, MEDB Vice President, “Virtually every field in every sector of the economy whether a small business or major industry is needing STEM professionals – people who are literate and fluent in various technology skills. But just teaching current technology applications does not serve our children well, because technology changes so rapidly. So we need to focus on empowering our youth to be self-directed learners, to be resilient, to stay current and be adaptive to change and not be scared by it. And, most importantly, to have the confidence that they can do it. Instilling these values are at the heart of MEDB’s STEMworks™ program and what this conference is all about.” The 8th Annual Hawaii STEM Conference is sponsored by: Office of Naval Research U.S. Department of Education U.S. Department of Labor County of Maui MEDB Ke Alahele Education Fund Microsoft Strada Education Network University of Hawaii at Manoa Hawaii Energy 21st Century Community Learning Centers Esri Hawaii Geographic Information Coordinating Council (HIGICC) Hawaiian Electric Company Opterra Energy Services Trimble SketchUp Central Pacific Bank Apple Inc. Creative Industries Hawaii Creative Lab Hawaii Autodesk National Security Agency STEM Pre-Academy Monsanto Ozobot King Kekaulike High School Maui High School ACOM Searider Productions Ben Franklin Crafts/Ace Hardware by HouseMart Blue Planet Camp CenterStage DevLeague Drone Services Hawaii Elemental Minds 3D Innovations Hawaii HCM Creative Media Team Hi FusionEd Iolani School The Janus Group Momilani Elementary School Maunakea Scholars National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Regional SATCOM Support Center-Pacific U.S. Army Space and Missle Defense Command Patsy T. Mink Center for Business & Leadership Seaglide Robonation STEMJOBS State of Hawaii Department of Labor State of Hawaii Department of Education University of Hawaii Manoa College of Engineering University of Hawaii, Maui College The Women in Technology Project is a statewide initiative of the Maui Economic Development Board. WIT is funded in part by the U.S. Departments of Education and Agriculture, Office of Naval Research, State of Hawaii, and the County of Maui. For more information on the 2017 Hawaii STEM Conference, visit http://womenintech.com/HawaiiSTEMConference or contact WIT Program K-12 STEM Education Director Isla Young at isla(at)medb(dot)org or 808-250-2888.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.theenergycollective.com

Energy markets are evolving toward a greater reliance upon distributed energy resources, or DERs, whether those resources generate, store, or manage the use of electricity. Strategies to harvest more value from smaller, cleaner, and smarter energy resources are being deployed today. One such strategy is a virtual power plant (VPP), which through intelligent aggregation and optimization of DER can provide the same essential services as a traditional 24/7 centralized power plant. Navigant Research defines a VPP as “a system that relies upon software and a smart grid to remotely and automatically dispatch retail DER services to a distribution or wholesale market via an aggregation and optimization platform.” Europe has experience with supply-side VPPs where a portfolio of diverse resources are orchestrated through smart grid technology to provide balancing services that would be provided by a conventional, steel-in-the ground, 24/7 coal, gas, or nuclear plant. Most of these VPPs are focused on variable renewable sources, though there are supply-side VPPs that aggregate and optimize diesel generation and other fossil assets. While in North America demand response (DR) can be considered a form of VPP, as reduction in demand is substituted for additional generation when called upon by grid operators. But the growing commercialization of energy storage – global revenue grew 45% globally in 2016, to $1.3 billion, and 54% in the United States, to $427 million – increasingly allows for combinations of supply- and demand-side resources working together, with energy storage bridging the gaps between them. These multi-dimensional VPPs promise the maximum benefit of their component advanced energy technologies – and have become realities in places like California, Hawaii, New York, Austria, Australia, and Ontario. Energy storage is not a prerequisite to the creation of a VPP, but it acts like the glue that enhances the flexibility and the underlying value of other generation and load assets assembled in the VPP portfolio. The reason storage is so critical to flexibility is the speed of response time on shifting load up and down. Rather than merely providing a buffer to optimize DER, storage becomes a critical component of service delivery by providing, for example, bulk storage and load leveling services designed to reduce transmission and distribution losses. Stem, an energy storage vendor with a portfolio of 580 sites representing 100 MWh of capacity and 70 MWhs of stored energy, is involved in two projects with Hawaiian Electric that combine to act as a VPP. The company delivered a 1 MW mixed-asset VPP designed to demonstrate the reliability and scaling potential of software-driven storage to provide grid stability and efficiency that will help Hawaii reach its goal of 100% renewable energy by 2045. Working in partnership with Hawaiian Electric, 29 commercial and institutional customers across the island of Oahu will rely on Stem’s behind-the-meter energy storage software and power monitors to manage their energy use against predictive load needs and utility tariff data to boost efficiency and control loads. Stem aggregates these storage devices and makes excess capacity available to Hawaiian Electric grid operators, with responses in real times. Stem collects and transmits that cloud-based data along with the data from 300 other locations with data-only capability to Hawaiian Electric to integrate into their renewable energy monitoring forecasting. Ultimately, energy storage-enabled VPPs let a utility add the capacity of a power plant to its system without investing in a new physical plant. The capital costs are shared with end users and the benefits are accrued by both the end customer and the utility. VPPs can stretch supplies from existing generators and utility demand reduction programs (and other forms of DER). According to Navigant Research, global spending on energy storage devices for VPPs will reach $12 billion annually by 2025. Currently, the most prevalent storage technologies for VPP-based ancillary services are lithium-ion batteries and flywheels. The most versatile of storage technologies utilized in VPPs today are Li-ion batteries, which are capable of delivering support services at the centralized grid, substation, and generation levels. Li-ion batteries can also be deployed for community energy storage – a new application directly affecting both VPPs and microgrids – and be installed to firm up large-scale and distributed variable renewable resources. Flywheels are less versatile, but have extremely long lifespans (i.e., the number of times they can be charged and discharged before the unit breaks down) and can provide grid regulation services instantaneously. Manufacture of storage-sized Li-ion batteries has long been dominated by Asian companies, but the United States made its mark in late 2016 with the arrival of one of the world’s largest factories. Tesla Motors, which added powerful energy storage systems to its suite of energy solutions in 2015, recently started production in a Nevada-based Gigafactory. The massive production facility, located just outside of Reno, makes batteries for Tesla’s energy storage arm in addition to batteries for the company’s much-anticipated Model 3 electric car. At this facility, Tesla expects to double the world’s production of Li-ion batteries, according to Bloomberg News – providing a lot “glue” for the world’s VPPs. Energy storage-enabled VPPs pose significant potential for integrating supply and demand side resources, while still enhancing grid service capabilities – without needing to invest in new physical power plants. Indeed, VPPs provide another tool for utilities as the grid becomes more flexible, resilient, and cleaner. Find out more about this year’s advanced energy trends and the full size of the advanced energy market by downloading Advanced Energy Now 2017 Market Report, available for free at the link below: This post is one in a series of feature stories on trends shaping advanced energy markets in the U.S. and around the world, drawn from Advanced Energy Now 2017 Market Report, which was prepared for AEE by Navigant Research.


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

SAN FRANCISCO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--8minutenergy Renewables, LLC (“8minutenergy”), the largest independent solar power developer in the U.S., announced it has expanded into the energy storage market with a 1 gigawatt (GW) project pipeline. The company is focused on standalone storage and hybrid (solar PV + storage) systems, driven by its storage leadership team that has several decades of experience building some of America’s largest energy storage, renewable energy, and transmission projects. 8minutenergy is pursuing opportunities in key solar markets, including California, where the company maintains more than 700 MW in operational generation assets, and a 12.5% utility market share. The company is also addressing growing markets such as Texas and the Southeast. Moving into energy storage aligns with industry forecasts, with GTM Research predicting that the nation’s annual energy storage capacity will surge to 655 MW in 2018, and will exceed 2 GW in 2021. “Utilities and corporations nationwide are looking for reliable, cost-competitive clean energy solutions. Solar PV and energy storage are poised to meet this demand while delivering strong returns,” said 8minutenergy’s Vice President of Storage Solutions, Steve McKenery. “Not only can storage improve project economics, but it can also make renewable power dispatchable – that’s a clear win for the future of clean energy.” 8minutenergy is working with industry-leading manufacturers to offer energy storage solutions featuring lithium-ion and flow batteries, flywheels, and other storage mediums. In order to develop cutting-edge power plants, the company applies its technology-agnostic approach and proven utility-scale solar experience. 8minutenergy has also expanded its existing solar PV research and development facility by adding energy storage facilities to test plant performance innovations and grid balancing capabilities. “Having worked closely with the largest utilities in America for the past few decades allows us to uniquely understand our customers’ needs and system requirements,” said 8minutenergy’s Vice President of Storage Integration, Carl Stills. “We are working on storage solutions that are already cost-competitive across the board, improve energy yield, and maximize renewable incentives. Now with fully dispatchable renewable energy, we can complement any existing utility portfolio.” 8minutenergy’s core energy storage team includes experts with over 100 years’ of combined experience in the utility, transmission, and storage sectors; as well as experience in storage development with customers such as Southern California Edison, Imperial Irrigation District, San Diego Gas & Electric, Consolidated Edison, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, and Hawaiian Electric Company. The team has initiated and/or managed several of America’s largest energy storage projects and advancements, including the first lithium-ion energy storage project over 30 MW in the western U.S., and the first utility-scale wind and storage project in Hawaii. Additionally, the team has numerous patents pending in battery storage solutions. To learn more, contact the company at info@8minutenergy.com or visit www.8minutenergy.com/energy-storage. Founded in 2009, 8minutenergy Renewables is the nation’s largest independent developer of solar PV and storage projects. To date, 8minutenergy has nearly 5.5 GW under development in North America, operates over 700 MW in solar assets, and been awarded more than 1.5 GW in power purchase agreements. The company is developing some of the largest solar plants in the world, including the 800 MW Mount Signal farm in California. 8minutenergy has an unmatched ability to produce affordable clean energy, and to deliver strong financial returns on utility-scale solar and storage projects. For more information, please visit www.8minutenergy.com.


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

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(APCI) Albert Heijn Alpha Natural Resources Anhui Huaqiang Natural Gas Anthony Veder Apache APNG Barents NaturGass Bayernwerk AG Bechtel and Chart Energy & Chemicals BG Group Black & Veatch Blu LNG BOC Bomin Linde LNG BP Buffalo Marine Service Buquebus CCB - Gasnor CETS (CNOOC) Chart Industries, Inc. Cheniere Texas Chesapeake Energy Chevron China LNG Group Limited China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC) Chinese Construction Bank (CCB) Chinese National Offshore Oil Corp (CNOOC) Chive Fuels Chuo Kaiun CH4 Energy Clean Energy Corp. CME Colony Energy Partners Conferenza GNL ConocoPhillips Conrad Shipyard Consol Energy Copenhagen Malmo Port COSCO Group Cryonorm BV Cryostar Group CSR Daiichi Dalian Inteh Group Danyang Dart Energy Deen Shipping DHL Bawtry DNV GL Donsotank / Jahre Marine AS Dresser Rand Dunkerque LNG DUON Elengy Enagas Encana Energigas Engie (GDF Suez) Eni ENN ENOSLNG Evergas Evol LNG Exmar ExxonMobil Fairbanks Natural Gas Fenosa Reganosa Ferus Finish Gas Association Fjord Line AS Flint Hills Resources Fluxys Fordonsgas Fortis BC Energy Fujian Energy Gas Natural GasEner SLR Gasnor Shell Gasrec Gasum Gasunie Gavle Hamn Gaz Métro LNG Gazprom GE-Energy GNF Golar LNG GoldEnergy GoldEnergy Commercializadora de Energia, S.A GoLNG INDONESIA Gyproc AS HAM Group Harvey Gulf Harvey Gulf International Marine Hawaiian Electric Company Herose Hess Corporation Hiroshima LNG Hogaki Zosen Hokkaido Gas Honeywell I.M. Skaugen InterStream Barging Itochu Jahre Marine Japan Exploration Co. Ltd (Japex) Japan Liquid Gas Jensen Maritime Jereh Group Jiangnan Shipyard Group JX Energy JX Nippon Oil & Energy Klapeidos Nafta Knutsen Kogas Kosan Crisplant Kunlun Energy Company Limited Linde Group Liquefied Natural Gas Limited Liqueline Lloyds Register LNG 24 LNG America LNG Europe B.V. LNG Hybrid LNG Silesia Manga LNG Marubeni MCGC MedoEnergi Meyer Werft GmbH Mitsui Monfort National Grid Naturgass New Times Energy New York City Department of Transportation Nihon Gas Ningbo Xinle Shipbuilding Group Noble Energy Norgas Carriers NYK Ohio Gas Company Okinawa EP Osaka Gas Oy AGA Ab Perbadanan/NYK Pertamina Perusahaan Gas Negara PetroChina Petronet PGNIG Plum Energy ONLG Polish Oil and Gas Co. Polski LNG Polski LNG - Polish Oil and Gas Co. 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