Kaneohe, HI, United States

Hawaii Pacific University

www.hpu.edu
Kaneohe, HI, United States

Hawaiʻi Pacific University, also known as HPU, is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational university located in Honolulu and Kaneohe, in the U.S. state of Hawaii.Hawaiʻi Pacific University is the largest private university in the central Pacific, most noted for its diverse student body of nearly 7,000 students, representing nearly 80 countries. The school's largest academic programs are in Business Administration, Nursing, Psychology, and International Studies.Hawaiʻi Pacific University has two main campuses in addition to an Oceanic Institute and Military programs. HPU's downtown Honolulu campus serves most of the business, liberal arts, and other general programs; while the Hawaiʻi Loa campus on the windward side of the Koʻolau Range houses the majority of the science programs. Wikipedia.


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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Leading higher education information and resource provider AffordableCollegesOnline.org has announced its list of the best online colleges for veterans and military personnel for 2017. The ranking names the top 59 two- and four-year schools and the top 50 four-year schools in the nation based on service member-friendly benefits, affordability and program quality. The four-year schools with the best scores were University of Southern Mississippi, Webster University, Saint Leo University, University of Idaho and Murray State University. The top five two-year schools include Central Texas College, St. Philip’s College, Mount Wachusett Community College, Wake Technical Community College and Del Mar College. "Veterans and current members of the military face some unique challenges when it comes to earning a certificate or degree,” said Dan Schuessler, CEO and founder of AffordableCollegesOnline.org. “These schools have demonstrated a commitment to providing outstanding benefits and resources to service members who choose to pursue an online education, while also maintaining affordability and quality standards.” To qualify for a spot on AffordableCollegesOnline.org’s rankings, schools must meet several minimum requirements. Each college cited is institutionally accredited and holds public or private not-for-profit standing. Each is also scored based on a comparison of more than a dozen metrics including the availability and amount of financial aid, military tuition discounts, ROTC programs, veteran support services and graduation rates by school. AffordableCollegesOnline.org enforces strict affordability standards, requiring schools to offer in-state tuition rates below $20,000 per year for four-year schools, and below $5,000 per year for two-year schools. All eligible school scores are compared to determine the final “Best” list. For complete details on the data and methodology used to score each school and a full list of ranking colleges, visit: Top Four-Year Schools in the U.S. with Military-Friendly Online Programs for 2017: Arkansas State University-Main Campus Azusa Pacific University Ball State University Columbia College Dallas Baptist University Duquesne University East Carolina University Eastern Kentucky University Hampton University Hawaii Pacific University Iowa State University Kansas State University Lawrence Technological University Lewis University Mercy College Mississippi State University Missouri State University-Springfield Montana State University-Billings Murray State University New England College Niagara University Northern Arizona University Northern Kentucky University Norwich University Oklahoma State University-Main Campus Oral Roberts University Point Park University Regis University Saint Leo University Texas A & M University-College Station The College of Saint Scholastica The University of Alabama The University of Montana Tiffin University Troy University University of Arizona University of Cincinnati-Main Campus University of Idaho University of Mississippi University of Nebraska at Omaha University of North Carolina at Greensboro University of Oklahoma-Norman Campus University of South Florida-Main Campus University of Southern Mississippi University of the Incarnate Word University of Toledo Viterbo University Washington State University Webster University Western Kentucky University Top Two-Year Schools in the U.S. with Military-Friendly Online Programs for 2017: ### AffordableCollegesOnline.org began in 2011 to provide quality data and information about pursuing an affordable higher education. Our free community resource materials and tools span topics such as financial aid and college savings, opportunities for veterans and people with disabilities, and online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success. We have been featured by nearly 1,100 postsecondary institutions and nearly 120 government organizations.


Just because dolphins are born in water doesn't necessarily mean that their in-built SCUBA system is fully prepared for action at birth; it can take between 1 and 3 years for the oxygen carrying capacity of whales and dolphins to mature sufficiently. Shawn Noren, from the University of California, Santa Cruz, USA, explains that the muscles of fully developed diving species - including dolphins, whales, birds and seals - contain more of the oxygen carrying protein, myoglobin, than land-based animals and are better prepared to neutralise lactic acid produced in the muscles when divers switch to anaerobic respiration after exhausting their oxygen toward the end of a dive. "We wondered if pelagic (offshore) living promotes rapid postnatal maturation of muscle biochemistry", says Noren. In other words, might deep-diving ocean-going whales and dolphins develop large reserves of myoglobin and the ability to buffer muscle against acid earlier in in life than species that remain in shallow coastal waters? Noren and her colleagues measured the oxygen storage capacity and muscle biochemistry of spinner dolphin swim muscles and discovered that they matured no faster than the muscles of coastal species. They also publish their calculations suggesting that the muscles' slow development could place calves at risk of separation from their mothers during pursuits by commercial fishing fleets in Journal of Experimental Biology. As it is almost impossible to collect muscle samples from spinner dolphins in the open ocean, Noren depended on Kristi West, from Hawaii Pacific University, USA - who set up a dolphin stranding program in Hawaii 11 years ago and attends all strandings on the island - to collect the essential samples. Over 7 years, West collected small portions of the swimming muscle from 17 spinner dolphins that her team had been unable to rescue - ranging in age from a foetus that died during birth to newborns, adolescents and fully grown males and females. She then shipped the samples to Santa Cruz, where Noren painstakingly analysed the muscles' myoglobin content and how much sodium hydroxide she had to add to 0.5g of minced muscle to raise the pH from 6 to 7 to measure the muscle's buffering capacity against anaerobic acid production. Plotting the animals' body lengths (which correlate well with their ages) against their muscle myoglobin content, Noren could see that the dolphins' abilities to carry oxygen continued increasing as the animals aged. The ability of the muscle to buffer against pH changes also increased gradually; however, it reached the capacity of the mature dolphins and plateaued at an age around 1.6-2 years, when the dolphin youngsters are weaned, which is similar to the age at which the diving apparatus of some coastal species reaches maturity. So ocean-going spinner dolphin calves do not develop the physical characteristics that are essential to sustain deep dives any faster than shallow-diving coastal species, such as bottlenose dolphins. However, the youngest spinner dolphins already had higher concentrations of muscle myoglobin than coastal bottlenose dolphins at the same ages, and the adult spinner dolphins' myoglobin concentrations (6-7.1g of Myoglobin/100g of wet muscle mass) matched those that had been measured previously for other champion divers, including short-finned pilot whales and Gervais' beaked whales. But what implications might the relatively slow development of their diving apparatus have for young spinner dolphins in the Eastern Tropical Pacific? Knowing that tuna purse-seine fisheries in this region specifically target dolphin pods - they pursue the animals to exhaustion before encircling them in enormous nets to capture the tuna shoals that reside beneath - Noren calculated that an immature calf that cannot keep up might be adrift of its mother by up to 15.4km by the end of a 100min pursuit. Noren says, "The relatively underdeveloped muscle biochemistry of calves likely contributes to documented mother-calf separations for spinner dolphins chased by the tuna purse-seine fishery", and this could affect dolphin populations dramatically if our hunger for tuna continues to separate dolphin calves from their mothers. Explore further: International collaboration working to enhance protections for spinner dolphins More information: Noren, S. R. and West, K. (2017). Muscle biochemistry of a pelagic delphinid (Stenella longirostris longirostris): insight into fishery-induced separation of mothers and calves. J. Exp. Biol. 220, 1490-1496. DOI: 10.1242/jeb.153668


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Just because dolphins are born in water doesn't necessarily mean that their in-built SCUBA system is fully prepared for action at birth; it can take between 1 and 3 years for the oxygen carrying capacity of whales and dolphins to mature sufficiently. Shawn Noren, from the University of California, Santa Cruz, USA, explains that the muscles of fully developed diving species - including dolphins, whales, birds and seals - contain more of the oxygen carrying protein, myoglobin, than land-based animals and are better prepared to neutralise lactic acid produced in the muscles when divers switch to anaerobic respiration after exhausting their oxygen toward the end of a dive. 'We wondered if pelagic (offshore) living promotes rapid postnatal maturation of muscle biochemistry', says Noren. In other words, might deep-diving ocean-going whales and dolphins develop large reserves of myoglobin and the ability to buffer muscle against acid earlier in in life than species that remain in shallow coastal waters? Noren and her colleagues measured the oxygen storage capacity and muscle biochemistry of spinner dolphin swim muscles and discovered that they matured no faster than the muscles of coastal species. They also publish their calculations suggesting that the muscles' slow development could place calves at risk of separation from their mothers during pursuits by commercial fishing fleets in Journal of Experimental Biology at http://jeb. . As it is almost impossible to collect muscle samples from spinner dolphins in the open ocean, Noren depended on Kristi West, from Hawaii Pacific University, USA - who set up a dolphin stranding program in Hawaii 11 years ago and attends all strandings on the island - to collect the essential samples. Over 7 years, West collected small portions of the swimming muscle from 17 spinner dolphins that her team had been unable to rescue - ranging in age from a foetus that died during birth to newborns, adolescents and fully grown males and females. She then shipped the samples to Santa Cruz, where Noren painstakingly analysed the muscles' myoglobin content and how much sodium hydroxide she had to add to 0.5g of minced muscle to raise the pH from 6 to 7 to measure the muscle's buffering capacity against anaerobic acid production. Plotting the animals' body lengths (which correlate well with their ages) against their muscle myoglobin content, Noren could see that the dolphins' abilities to carry oxygen continued increasing as the animals aged. The ability of the muscle to buffer against pH changes also increased gradually; however, it reached the capacity of the mature dolphins and plateaued at an age around 1.6-2 years, when the dolphin youngsters are weaned, which is similar to the age at which the diving apparatus of some coastal species reaches maturity. So ocean-going spinner dolphin calves do not develop the physical characteristics that are essential to sustain deep dives any faster than shallow-diving coastal species, such as bottlenose dolphins. However, the youngest spinner dolphins already had higher concentrations of muscle myoglobin than coastal bottlenose dolphins at the same ages, and the adult spinner dolphins' myoglobin concentrations (6-7.1g of Myoglobin/100g of wet muscle mass) matched those that had been measured previously for other champion divers, including short-finned pilot whales and Gervais' beaked whales. But what implications might the relatively slow development of their diving apparatus have for young spinner dolphins in the Eastern Tropical Pacific? Knowing that tuna purse-seine fisheries in this region specifically target dolphin pods - they pursue the animals to exhaustion before encircling them in enormous nets to capture the tuna shoals that reside beneath - Noren calculated that an immature calf that cannot keep up might be adrift of its mother by up to 15.4km by the end of a 100min pursuit. Noren says, 'The relatively underdeveloped muscle biochemistry of calves likely contributes to documented mother-calf separations for spinner dolphins chased by the tuna purse-seine fishery', and this could affect dolphin populations dramatically if our hunger for tuna continues to separate dolphin calves from their mothers. IF REPORTING THIS STORY, PLEASE MENTION JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY AS THE SOURCE AND, IF REPORTING ONLINE, PLEASE CARRY A LINK TO: http://jeb. REFERENCE: Noren, S. R. and West, K. (2017). Muscle biochemistry of a pelagic delphinid (Stenella longirostris longirostris): insight into fishery-induced separation of mothers and calves. J. Exp. Biol. 220, 1490-1496. DOI: 10.1242/jeb.153668. This article is posted on this site to give advance access to other authorised media who may wish to report on this story. Full attribution is required, and if reporting online a link to jeb.biologists.com is also required. The story posted here is COPYRIGHTED. Therefore advance permission is required before any and every reproduction of each article in full. PLEASE CONTACT permissions@biologists.com


MILWAUKEE, Aug. 1, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- EnSync Energy Inc. (NYSE American: ESNC), dba EnSync Energy Systems, a leading developer of innovative distributed energy resources (DERs), today announced a 20-year power purchase agreement (PPA) with Hawai'i Pacific University (HPU) to build a...


Dye S.T.,Hawaii Pacific University | Dye S.T.,University of Hawaii at Manoa
Reviews of Geophysics | Year: 2012

[1] Chemical and physical Earth models agree little as to the radioactive power of the planet. Each predicts a range of radioactive powers, overlapping slightly with the other at about 24 TW, and together spanning 14-46 TW. Approximately 20% of this radioactive power (3-8 TW) escapes to space in the form of geoneutrinos. The remaining 11-38 TW heats the planet with significant geodynamical consequences, appearing as the radiogenic component of the 43-49 TW surface heat flow. The nonradiogenic component of the surface heat flow (5-38 TW) is presumably primordial, a legacy of the formation and early evolution of the planet. A constraining measurement of radiogenic heating provides insights to the thermal history of the Earth and potentially discriminates chemical and physical Earth models. Radiogenic heating in the planet primarily springs from unstable nuclides of uranium, thorium, and potassium. The paths to their stable daughter nuclides include nuclear beta decays, producing geoneutrinos. Large subsurface detectors efficiently record the energy but not the direction of the infrequent interactions of the highest-energy geoneutrinos, originating only from uranium and thorium. The measured energy spectrum of the interactions estimates the relative amounts of these heatproducing elements, while the intensity estimates planetary radiogenic power. Recent geoneutrino observations in Japan and Italy find consistent values of radiogenic heating. The combined result mildly excludes the lowest model values of radiogenic heating and, assuming whole mantle convection, identifies primordial heat loss. Future observations have the potential to measure radiogenic heating with better precision, further constraining geological models and the thermal evolution of the Earth. This review presents the science and status of geoneutrino observations and the prospects for measuring the radioactive power of the planet. © 2012. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

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