Diepenbeek, Belgium
Diepenbeek, Belgium

Hasselt University is a university with campuses in Hasselt and Diepenbeek, Belgium. It was officially established in 1971, as the Limburgs Universitair Centrum . On June 15, 2005 the university changed its name to Hasselt University.Currently, the universities of Hasselt and Maastricht work together as the Transnational University Limburg . Together with Hogeschool PXL , it established the Limburg Association of Higher Education .The rector of the university currently is Prof. Luc de Schepper, the vice rectors are Prof. Paul Janssen and Prof. Jean-Michel Rigo. Wikipedia.


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Patent
Imec and Hasselt University | Date: 2015-05-20

The disclosure relates to a method for forming a conformal coating on a substrate having a topography presenting a relief. One method of the disclosure includes setting the temperature of the substrate within the range 140-275 C., and coating an aqueous solution including a sol-gel precursor on said substrate. The disclosure also relates to a method for fabricating a battery, a capacitor, a catalyst, a photovoltaic cell or a sensor using such a method, and to an aqueous solution for use in such a method.


Patent
Hasselt University | Date: 2017-01-04

The present invention relates to the diagnosis of autoimmune disorders, more specifically to the diagnosis of rheumatoid disorders, chronic autoimmune arthritis and even more specifically to the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. A biomarker panel is provided which can be used to detect if a subject has rheumatoid arthritis. Also described are methods of identification of such biomarkers.


Patent
Studiengesellschaft Kohle Mbh and Hasselt University | Date: 2017-06-28

The present invention refers to a process making use of a radical initiator system comprising peroxy compounds, in particular peroxyketals, in the presence of an acid catalyst to initiate radical processes at low temperature, such as room temperature and below.


Patent
Imec and Hasselt University | Date: 2017-03-29

The present invention relates to a method for forming a conformal coating on a substrate having a topography presenting a relief, said method comprising the steps of: a. Setting the temperature of the substrate within the range 140- 275 C, and b. coating an aqueous solution comprising a sol-gel precursor on said substrate; It also relates to a method for fabricating a battery, a capacitor, a catalyst, a photovoltaic cell or a sensor comprising such a method, and to an aqueous solution for use in such a method.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: MG-3.4-2014 | Award Amount: 4.96M | Year: 2015

The InDeV project addresses the second bullet point of the topic MG.3.4. i.e. in-depth understanding of road accident causation. The main objective of the project is to develop a tool-box for in-depth analysis of accident causation for Vulnerable Road Users (VRU) based on a combined use of accident databases, in-depth accident investigations, surrogate safety indicators, self-reported accidents and naturalistic behavioural data. The tool-box will help to link accident causation factors to VRUs accident risk, and provide a solid basis for developing preventive countermeasures and a better input for socio-economic cost calculations of VRU accidents. The proposed approach is to reveal the causational factors by focusing on the process of accident development, thus overcoming the main weakness of the traditional accident data based approach that might find correlations between various factors and accident frequency, but not show the causation chains. It will also employ, to a larger extent, observation of critical traffic events that are similar in process to real accidents, but are relatively more frequent and easier to collect in sufficient quantities. The InDeV project includes the following steps: i) review of methods and identification of the critical sites and road user groups; ii) observation studies at the selected sites; iii) development of technical tools for automated behaviour data collection; iv) analysis of the socio-economical costs; v) compilation of the project results and development of the safety analyst tool-box. The project has a clear focus on VRUs and the course of events in accidents they get injured in. It will provide solid knowledge, help to avoid a skewed view on the problem of VRUs safety, and facilitate the proposed tailor-made countermeasures for these groups. Moreover, with the use of surrogate safety indicators, there will be no need to wait for accidents to happen in order to learn how to prevent them from happening.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-10-2014 | Award Amount: 6.00M | Year: 2015

The emergence of highly diverse resistance mechanisms among pathogens requires their detailed analysis to guarantee an efficient medical treatment. The gold standard in clinical diagnostics is based on the cultivation of bacteria and their phenotypical characterisation. However, these methods are labour-intensive and time-consuming lasting in some cases up to a few weeks. Thus, faster diagnostic techniques are necessary to ensure an immediate and targeted treatment of the patient. DNA-based diagnostics can provide the relevant results within a few hours. The requirements for a clinical DNA-based characterisation method are high; more than 1000 clinically relevant antibiotic resistance genes, a few hundred phylogenetic marker genes and virulence factors have to be targeted (including SNP detection). The limit of detection has to be low because a few 100 bacterial cells in the blood system can lead to the death of the patient. It should be possible to analyse a wide range of clinical sample origins such as stool, blood, urine and saliva using the same test. In addition, the results have to be obtained within a single working day. In our project, we will develop two diagnostic systems that can be with direct sample material from patients. Thus, the time-consuming cultivation of pathogens will be avoided. Additionally, the test will be more sensitive, specific and faster than any other test on the market using an innovative DNA probe concept.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC5-04-2015 | Award Amount: 5.85M | Year: 2016

The iSCAPE project aims to integrate and advance the control of air quality and carbon emissions in European cities in the context of climate change through the development of sustainable and passive air pollution remediation strategies, policy interventions and behavioural change initiatives. It will tackle the problem of reducing air pollution at target receptors with an innovative SME-led approach, focusing on the use of Passive Control Systems in urban spaces. Improvements in air quality, microclimate and behavioural aspects of urban dwellers will be achieved by applying real-world physical interventions on the urban tissue to alter ventilation rates and dispersion patterns in the selected cities assessed for future climate change scenarios and representative of different cultural&life styles in Europe. Through the approach of Living Labs the team will deploy a network of air quality and meteorological sensors (both stationary and mobile) and evaluate through analysis and a suite of up-to-date numerical modelling the benefits expected from the interventions on a neighbourhood and city-wide scale for several aspects ranging from quantification of pollutant concentration to exposure. iSCAPE encapsulates the concept of smart cities by promoting the use of low-cost sensors, engaging citizens in the use of alternative solution processes to environmental problems. iSCAPE will support sustainable urban development by promoting the sharing of results with policy-makers and planners using local test-cases, and providing scientific evidence ready-to-use solutions potentially leading to real-time operational interventions. This integrated approach will include the development and assessment of a framework aimed at changing the mobility behaviour of people by studying processes and dynamics that lead to more resilient, healthy, and sustainable cities, by bringing together theory from urban planning, public policy, urban and environmental sociology and urban geography.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 3.87M | Year: 2016

CHEurope focuses on developing a new integrated theoretical and methodological framework to enhance the academic and professional training and open future job opportunities in cultural heritage preservation, management and promotion. Heritage has commonly been perceived through its contingent relationship to other areas, preventing it to be considered as a legitimate scientific discipline. Moreover, research and practice in this field are still too often seen as separate dimensions. Thus, there is an increasing need to address these diverging trends in the expanding heritage industry with a critical approach that situates cultural heritage in its social, economic and political frameworks, as well as in professional practice. Bringing together a network of key European academic and non-academic organisations, the project will explore the processes by which heritage is assembled through practice-based research in partner institutions that connect students to their future job markets and publics. Our aim is to inform more conventional aspects of cultural heritage designation, care and management with a strong focus on present and future consumers. We propose an advanced learning strategy based on the emerging field of Critical Heritage Studies, which combines theoretical and instrumental knowledge at a transnational and interdisciplinary level, in a series of research seminars, summer schools and secondments. The program is based on themes where cultural heritage is undergoing profound change, such as Heritage Futures, Curating the City, Digital Heritage, Heritage and Wellbeing and Management and Citizen Participation. In so doing, this research will have a direct impact on future heritage policies and be linked explicitly to new modes of training. These will enable future practitioners to facilitate a more democratic and informed dialogue between and across various heritage industries and their users, promoting entrepreneurship and innovation in this field.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: ERC-COG | Phase: ERC-CoG-2015 | Award Amount: 1.64M | Year: 2016

TransMID focuses on the development of novel methods to estimate key epidemiological parameters from both serological and social contact data, with the aim to significantly expand the range of public health questions that can be adequately addressed using such data. Using new statistical and mathematical theory and newly collected as well as readily available serological and social contact data (mainly from Europe), fundamental mathematical and epidemiological challenges as outlined in the following work packages will be addressed: (a) frequency and density dependent mass action relating potential effective contacts to transmission dynamics in (sub)populations of different sizes with an empirical assessment using readily available contact data, (b) behavioural and temporal variations in contact patterns and their impact on the dynamics of infectious diseases, (c) close contact household networks and the assumption of homogeneous mixing within households, (d) estimating parameters from multivariate and serial cross-sectional serological data taking temporal effects and heterogeneity in acquisition into account in combination with the use of social contact data, and (e) finally the design of sero- and social contact surveys with specific focus on serial cross-sectional surveys. TransMID is transdisciplinary in nature with applications on diseases of major public health interest, such as pertussis, cytomegalovirus and measles. Translational methodology is placed at the heart of TransMID resulting in the development of a unifying methodology for other diseases and settings. The development of a toolbox and accompanying software allow easy and effective application of these fundamentally improved techniques on many infectious diseases and in different geographic contexts, which should maximize TransMIDs impact on public health in Europe and beyond.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-IF-GF | Phase: MSCA-IF-2015-GF | Award Amount: 240.53K | Year: 2017

Spillover, or cross-species transmission, of pathogens from wildlife to humans is the major cause of emerging infectious diseases such as HIV, Ebola virus or SARS. Yet despite this relevance spillover as a natural process is little known, and there is a pressing need for general theory on spillover. We propose to develop a new conceptual framework for spillover, by using an interdisciplinary approach to analyse an exceptionally complete dataset of Leptospira spillover from California sea lions to endangered Channel Island foxes. Guided by the OneHealth vision, we will combine concepts and methods from human epidemiology, disease ecology and island biology to create a model of Leptospira spillover risk that will provide a unique opportunity to develop and extract general concepts. Through this process, Borremans, the applying experienced researcher, will acquire a strong set of skills that will boost his expertise and significantly advance his professional profile. He will be guided by two high-profile researchers, Lloyd-Smith (UCLA) and Hens (UHasselt) and will benefit from collaborations through their extensive international networks, ensuring Borremans visibility at an international level.

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