Makassar, Indonesia

Hasanuddin University

www.unhas.ac.id
Makassar, Indonesia

Hasanuddin University is one of the biggest stated-owned universities in Indonesia, based in Makassar, the capital of South Sulawesi province. The university was established in 1956, and named after Sultan Hasanuddin, a King of Gowa Kingdom. Before the official launching by the first vice President of Indonesia, Mohammad Hatta, there had been in Makassar a faculty of economy of University of Indonesia,centered in Jakarta. This faculty became the seed of Hasanuddin University. Wikipedia.

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News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: en.prnasia.com

JAKARTA, Indonesia, May 12, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Xirka Silicon Technology today unveiled the launch of Chipset SCard XCT136, the first local Indonesian smart card, providing multi-function purposes for student identity cards. To track student attendance, it works by using computerized fingerprint scanners to ensure a secure environment. It also offers a cashless transaction option, so all transactions related to university activities can be done by swiping the card. Supported by Indonesian Ministry of Research, Technology, and Higher Education together with Indonesian Ministry of Communication and Informatics, the chipset currently targets educational institutions, such as University of Indonesia, Bandung Institute of Technology, Hasanuddin University, and Telkom University, and is widely applied to electronic student identity cards. "The digital economy has a tremendous potential in advancing the Indonesian economy. This sector will contribute up to 11% of economic development in 2020. If accomplished, in 2030 Indonesia will occupy the 8th position in the world economy. Therefore, it needs greater innovation to face global competitiveness and this chipset development is the answer," said Rudiantara, Minister of Communication and Information Technology of the Republic of Indonesia at the launch ceremony of Chipset SCard XCT 136 on May 12th 2017. Through Industrial Technology Development Program and Technology Innovation Program, Ministry of Research, Technology, and Higher Education of the Republic of Indonesia initiated the product development, involving students from state universities in Indonesia. By participating in the development process, the students are given the opportunity to showcase their ability to create and innovate, among their peers. According to research from MARS Indonesia, in 2016, state universities in Indonesia had a total of 507,000 new students. "Therefore, to answer market needs, Xirka Silicon Technology will provide up to 1 million units of Chipset SCard XCT136 per year for those universities," said Sylvia W. Sumarlin, President Director of PT Xirka Silicon Technology. Research and production of each component of the chipset are carried out domestically in Bandung, West Java, ensuring security against data breaches and fraud from cybercriminals. The exclusive production of chipset components in Indonesia has been successful so far in preventing other countries from gaining access or gathering information about the design and architecture of these detailed components. "It ensures data confidentiality, since no other regions will have any access to its design without Xirka's permission," added Sylvia. Xirka Silicon Technology started producing chipsets in 2007 and entered into the wider APAC regional market by partnering with Siltera-Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan, and Japan. They won the first prize at Asia Pacific ICT Alliance Award 2008 (APICTA) for the development of WiMAX baseband chipset. In 2016, Xirka Silicon Technology completed development of its local smart card protocol, which includes Key Management System, Card Management System, and Smart Card Operating System allowing for support of multi-application features. According to Sylvia, the chipset provides several blocks of data storage memory. "Each offers different functions, such as application ID, payment, and loyalty card. Early next year, Xirka plans to launch Near-Field Communication (NFC) chipsets, which is commonly used for electronic ticket and mobile payment." Together, Xirka Silicon Technology and Microelectronics Center Bandung Institute of Technology worked to optimize security and data storage by strengthening technologies in all support systems, including card reader portable, virtual Secure Access Module (SAM), secure network, and card database. In security optimization, Chipset SCard XCT136 utilizes security engine DES and 3DES, adding 136 Kbyte to the chipsets to support more extensive data saving. Xirka Silicon Technology is a fabless company that focuses on the development of WiMAX baseband chipsets.  Established in May, 2007, it delivers a System-on-Chip (SoC) for Broadband Wireless Access (BWA) to fulfill businesses needs, supporting everybody's dynamic lifestyle which very often requires immediate attention and action. To provide assurance, our SoC uses IEEE 802.16d-2004 standard for nomadic WiMAX and IEEE 802.16e-2005 for mobile WiMAX. Continuing its commitment as a design company, since 2011 Xirka has developed SIM cards and proceeded with smart card products and derivatives such as access cards, ID cards and secured cards for banking by utilizing Near Field Communication (NFC) and RFID technologies. A lot of IT equipment will benefit from Xirka's chipset, such as, modem cards, computers, notebooks, mobile gadgets, CPE modems, etc. Xirka also recognizes the need of our clients to have a reliable chipset at an affordable price, therefore we have built our research and design center and developed products with clients' concerns on our mind.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

ITHACA, N.Y. - Seagrass meadows - bountiful underwater gardens that nestle close to shore and are the most common coastal ecosystem on Earth - can reduce bacterial exposure for corals, other sea creatures and humans, according to new research published in Science Feb. 16. "The seagrass appear to combat bacteria, and this is the first research to assess whether that coastal ecosystem can alleviate disease associated with marine organisms," said lead author Joleah Lamb of Cornell University's Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future, where she is a Nature Conservancy NatureNet fellow. Senior author Drew Harvell, Cornell University professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and an Atkinson Center Fellow, had been running an international workshop and examining the health of underwater corals with colleagues near small islands at Spermonde Archipelago, Indonesia. But after a few days, the entire research team fell ill with dysentery, and one scientist contracted typhoid. "I experienced firsthand how threats to both human health and coral health were linked," Harvell said. Lamb returned with an international team armed to test the waters. On these small islands freshwater is sparse, surface soil is thin and just off shore the marine environment teems with solid waste, sewage and wastewater pollution. Generally, the islands - though filled with people - do not have septic systems. The group used Enterococcus assays, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standard of health risk levels for wastewater pollution in recreational waters, to see whether seagrass meadows influenced bacterial levels. Water samples taken near the beaches exceeded exposure levels by a factor of 10. But, Lamb's team found threefold lower levels of Enterococcus in seawater collected from within seagrass meadows. "The genetic sequencing work pinpointed the kinds of bacteria - all in difficult, arduous conditions," said Harvell. "It showed exactly what was in the water. The beautiful oceanside water looked blue-green, but truly it was filled with dangerous pollution - some really bad stuff in the water close to shore." While research is beginning to reveal the mechanisms driving bacterial-load reductions in these ecosystems, it is evident that an intact seagrass ecosystem - home to filter-feeders like bivalves, sponges, tunicates (marine invertebrates) - removes more bacteria from water. As seagrass meadows and coral reefs are usually linked habitats, Lamb's team examined more than 8,000 reef-building corals for disease. The researchers found lower levels - by twofold - of disease on reefs with adjacent seagrass beds than on reefs without nearby grasses. "Millions of people rely on healthy coral reefs for food, income and cultural value," said Lamb. Harvell, Lamb and their colleagues agree that these findings are key to conserving seagrass ecosystems. "Global loss of seagrass meadows is about 7 percent each year since 1990," said Lamb. "Hopefully this research will provide a clear message about the benefits of seagrasses for human and marine health that will resonate globally." Regions around the world promote aquaculture to help feed populations, as diseases for many ocean-dwelling plants and animals increase, Harvell said, "Our goal is to stop measuring things dying and find solutions. Ecosystem services like seagrass meadow habitats are a solution to improve the health of people and the environment. Biodiversity is good for our health." Co-authors are Jeroen van de Water, Scientifique Centre de Monaco; David Bourne, Australian Institute of Marine Science; Craig Altier, Cornell's College of Veterinary Medicine; Margaux Hein, James Cook University, Australia; Evan Fiorenza; and Nur Abu and Jamaluddin Jompa, Hasanuddin University, Indonesia. The work, "Seagrass Ecosystems Reduce Exposure to Bacterial Pathogens of Humans, Fishes and Invertebrates," was supported by The Nature Conservancy NatureNet Fellowship through Cornell's Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future at Cornell, and the Capturing Coral Reef and Ecosystem Related Services Project funded by the Global Environment Facility and the World Bank. Cornell University has television, ISDN and dedicated Skype/Google+ Hangout studios available for media interviews.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Dead seagrass in the Florida Bay is turning the normally clear water a brownish-green, a trend that can be witnessed globally (AFP Photo/Kerry SHERIDAN) Boston (AFP) - Underwater meadows of seagrass offer important protection against pollution to both humans and coral reefs, but are in jeopardy worldwide due to climate change, sewage and agricultural runoff, researchers said Thursday. Places with healthy seagrass -- where sponges, clams, small fish and other filter feeders thrive -- can reduce bacteria that is harmful to both people and marine life by up to 50 percent, said the study in the journal Science. Corals located near seagrass meadows showed about half as much disease as those further away from these protective ecosystems, said the findings, presented in Boston at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting. "The seagrass appear to combat bacteria, and this is the first research to assess whether that coastal ecosystem can alleviate disease associated with marine organisms," said lead author Joleah Lamb of Cornell University. The idea for the study began when senior author Drew Harvell, a Cornell professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, was leading an international workshop to examine the health of underwater corals at Spermonde Archipelago in Indonesia. Within days, the entire research team fell ill with dysentery, and one scientist came down with typhoid. "I experienced firsthand how threats to both human health and coral health were linked," Harvell told reporters at the AAAS conference. "It occurred to me that if we could show that humans as well as corals are at risk from wastewater pollution, and show the role of seagrass ecosystems services in cleanup, it would help create incentives to preserve these valuable ecosystems." So researchers returned to test the waters in the same area, a region where freshwater is sparse and solid waste, sewage and wastewater pollution are rampant along the coasts because people do not have septic systems. Researchers tested for Enterococcus bacteria, a standard for assessing health risk established by the US Environmental Protection Agency. "In shorewaters, the researchers found the presence of the bacteria Enterococcus to exceed the US EPA recommended human health risk exposure level by 10-fold," said the study. But in water collected from within seagrass meadows, researchers found levels of Enterococcus were reduced three-fold. "The beautiful oceanside water looked blue-green, but truly it was filled with dangerous pollution - some really bad stuff in the water close to shore," said Harvell. Additionally, field surveys of over 8,000 reef-building corals near seagrass meadows showed two-fold reductions in disease compared to corals without seagrass neighbors, said the study. Globally, seagrass meadows are declining by about seven percent each year since 1990, researchers said. "It is a bit ironic that in a seagrass bed -- although beds have great powers to clean the water -- they cannot filter a pathogen that actually kills them," Harvell said. Although some conservationists have made efforts to re-plant lost seagrass, such projects are difficult and don't work well, researchers said. Lamb said the only way to really protect these vital underwater meadows is to reduce the human-driven threats that cause them to die, including global warming, pollution, sewage and development. "Hopefully this research will provide a clear message about the benefits of seagrasses for human and marine health that will resonate globally," said Lamb. Co-authors on the study came from the Centre Scientifique de Monaco, the Australian Institute of Marine Science, James Cook University in Australia and Hasanuddin University in Indonesia.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Dead seagrass in the Florida Bay is turning the normally clear water a brownish-green, a trend that can be witnessed globally (AFP Photo/Kerry SHERIDAN) Boston (AFP) - Underwater meadows of seagrass offer important protection against pollution to both humans and coral reefs, but are in jeopardy worldwide due to climate change, sewage and agricultural runoff, researchers said Thursday. Places with healthy seagrass -- where sponges, clams, small fish and other filter feeders thrive -- can reduce bacteria that is harmful to both people and marine life by up to 50 percent, said the study in the journal Science. Corals located near seagrass meadows showed about half as much disease as those further away from these protective ecosystems, said the findings, presented in Boston at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting. "The seagrass appear to combat bacteria, and this is the first research to assess whether that coastal ecosystem can alleviate disease associated with marine organisms," said lead author Joleah Lamb of Cornell University. The idea for the study began when senior author Drew Harvell, a Cornell professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, was leading an international workshop to examine the health of underwater corals at Spermonde Archipelago in Indonesia. Within days, the entire research team fell ill with dysentery, and one scientist came down with typhoid. "I experienced firsthand how threats to both human health and coral health were linked," Harvell told reporters at the AAAS conference. "It occurred to me that if we could show that humans as well as corals are at risk from wastewater pollution, and show the role of seagrass ecosystems services in cleanup, it would help create incentives to preserve these valuable ecosystems." So researchers returned to test the waters in the same area, a region where freshwater is sparse and solid waste, sewage and wastewater pollution are rampant along the coasts because people do not have septic systems. Researchers tested for Enterococcus bacteria, a standard for assessing health risk established by the US Environmental Protection Agency. "In shorewaters, the researchers found the presence of the bacteria Enterococcus to exceed the US EPA recommended human health risk exposure level by 10-fold," said the study. But in water collected from within seagrass meadows, researchers found levels of Enterococcus were reduced three-fold. "The beautiful oceanside water looked blue-green, but truly it was filled with dangerous pollution - some really bad stuff in the water close to shore," said Harvell. Additionally, field surveys of over 8,000 reef-building corals near seagrass meadows showed two-fold reductions in disease compared to corals without seagrass neighbors, said the study. Globally, seagrass meadows are declining by about seven percent each year since 1990, researchers said. "It is a bit ironic that in a seagrass bed -- although beds have great powers to clean the water -- they cannot filter a pathogen that actually kills them," Harvell said. Although some conservationists have made efforts to re-plant lost seagrass, such projects are difficult and don't work well, researchers said. Lamb said the only way to really protect these vital underwater meadows is to reduce the human-driven threats that cause them to die, including global warming, pollution, sewage and development. "Hopefully this research will provide a clear message about the benefits of seagrasses for human and marine health that will resonate globally," said Lamb. Co-authors on the study came from the Centre Scientifique de Monaco, the Australian Institute of Marine Science, James Cook University in Australia and Hasanuddin University in Indonesia.


Syafaruddin,Hasanuddin University | Karatepe E.,Ege University | Hiyama T.,Kumamoto University
Energy Conversion and Management | Year: 2012

Mismatching losses reduction of photovoltaic (PV) array has been intensively discussed through the increasing penetration of residential and commercial PV systems. Many causes of mismatching losses have been identified and plenty of proposed methods to solve this problem have been recently proposed. This paper deals with reducing method of mismatching losses due to the non-uniform irradiance conditions. It is well-known that a certain number of multiple peaks occur on the power-voltage curve as the number of PV modules in one-string increases under non-uniform operating conditions. Since the conventional control method only drives the operating points of PV system to the local maxima close to open circuit voltage, only small portion of power can be extracted from the PV system. In this study, a radial basis function neural network (RBF-ANN) based intelligent control method is utilized to map the global operating voltage and non-irradiance operating condition in string and central based MPPT systems. The proposed method has been tested on 10 × 3 (2.2 kW), 15 × 3 (2.5 kW) and 20 × 3 (3.3 kW) of series-parallel PV array configuration under random-shaded and continuous-shaded patterns. The proposed method is compared with the ideal case and conventional method through a simple power-voltage curve of PV arrays. The simulation results show that there are significant increases of about 30-60% of the extracted power in one operating condition when the proposed method is able to shift the operating voltage of modules to their optimum voltages. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Tahir D.,Hasanuddin University | Tougaard S.,University of Southern Denmark
Journal of Physics Condensed Matter | Year: 2012

The electronic and optical properties of Cu, CuO and Cu 2O were studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS). We report detailed Cu2p, Cu LVV, O1s and O KLL spectra which are in good agreement with previous results. REELS spectra, recorded for primary energies in the range from 150 to 2000eV, were corrected for multiple inelastically scattered electrons to determine the effective inelastic scattering cross section. The dielectric functions and optical properties were determined by comparing the experimental inelastic electron scattering cross section with a simulated cross section calculated within the semi-classical dielectric response model in which the only input is Im(1/ε) by using the QUEELS-ε(k,ω)-REELS software package. By KramersKronig transformation of the determined Im(1/ε), the real and imaginary parts (ε 1 and ε 2) of the dielectric function, and the refractive index n and extinction coefficient k were determined for Cu, CuO, and Cu 2O in the 0100eV energy range. Observed differences between Cu, CuO and Cu 2O are mainly due to modifications of the 3d and O2p electron configurations. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.


Jalaluddin,Saga University | Jalaluddin,Hasanuddin University | Miyara A.,Saga University
Applied Thermal Engineering | Year: 2012

The thermal performances of several types of vertical ground heat exchangers (GHEs) for ground source heat pump system have been investigated with different operation mode. Short time period of operation, discontinuous of 6 and 12 h operations in a day, and continuous operation modes were applied in the GHE system. The short time period of operation includes discontinuous 2 h operation in cooling mode and alternative operation mode with operating the GHE in cooling process and heating process to provide hot water supply. The models of three types of vertical GHEs, including U-tube, double-tube, and multi-tube GHEs, were built and simulated using the commercial computational fluid dynamics software FLUENT. The heat exchange rates of the GHEs have been investigated. The numerical results show the reasonable agreement with the experimental results. The off-time period in the discontinuous operation and extracting heat from the ground in the heating process in the alternative operation mode contributed significantly to the increasing the heat exchange rate. Operating the GHEs with different operation mode shows the different characteristic in their heat exchange rates. It can be constructive information for design of the GHE system in practical engineering. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Umar H.,Hasanuddin University
Acta medica Indonesiana | Year: 2010

Both Graves' disease and chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's thyroiditis) are autoimmune diseases of thyroid gland. Graves' disease is caused by stimulation of TSH receptor located on the thyroid gland by an antibody, which is known as TSH receptor antibody (TRAb). Furthermore, this may lead to hyperplasia and hyperfunction of the thyroid gland. On the contrary, the cause of Hashimoto's thyroiditis is thought due to a TSH stimulation-blocking antibody (TSBAb) which blocks the action of TSH hormone and subsequently brings damage and atrophy to thyroid gland. Approximately 15-20% of patients with Graves' disease had been reported to have spontaneous hypothyroidism resulting from the chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease). Pathogenesis for chronic thyroiditis following anti-thyroid drug treatment in patients with Graves' disease remains unclear. It has been estimated that chronic thyroiditis or Hashimoto's disease, which occurs following the Graves' disease episode is due to extended immune response in Graves' disease. It includes the immune response to endogenous thyroid antigens, i.e. thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin, which may enhance lymphocyte infiltration and finally causes Hashimoto's thyroiditis. We report four cases of chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease) in patients who have been previously diagnosed with Graves' hyperthyroidism. In three cases, Hashimoto's thyroiditis occurs in 7 to 25 years after the treatment of Grave's disease; while the other case has it only after few months of Grave's disease treatment. The diagnosis of Hashimoto's disease (chronic thyroiditis) was based on clinical manifestation, high TSHs level, positive thyroid peroxidase antibody and thyroglobulin antibody, and supported by positive results of fine needle aspiration biopsy. Moreover, the result of histopathological test has also confirmed the diagnosis in two cases. All cases have been successfully treated by levothyroxine treatment.


to investigate the potential association between the ACE gene polymorphism, essential hypertension and pulse pressure. the study included 99 non-hypertensive and 104 hypertensive subjects. Hypertension is defined as systolic blood pressure 140 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure 90 mmHg. Pulse pressure refers to the differences between the systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure. DNA amplication to examine ACE I/D polymorphism was conducted by Rigat-modification PCR method. this study showed no significant difference in genotype distribution and allele frequency between two groups. We found PP >60 mmHg is different between ACE gene genotype. Genotype DD has a risk of 1.8 times of having PP >60 mmHg than ID genotype while DD genotype has a risk of 4.4 times of having PP >60mg than II genotype. this study does not support that the I/D polymorphism at ACE gene locus associated with hypertension in Makassar, South-Sulawesi, Indonesia. However, there were a significant correlation with pulse pressure independent from blood pressure.


Zatalia S.R.,Hasanuddin University
Acta medica Indonesiana | Year: 2013

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder that remains a major health problem in the world. It is characterized by relative or absolute deficiency of insulin secretion and/or insulin resistance that causes chronic hyperglycemia and impaired carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins metabolism. Diabetes has been known as an oxidative stress disorder caused by imbalance between free radical formation and the ability of the body's natural antioxidants. Many studies have suggested that oxidative stress play a role in systemic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, impaired secretion of pancreatic cells and impaired glucose utilization in peripheral tissues. In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who are at risk, intensive intervention with multiple drug combinations and lifestyle modifications showed a beneficial effect on vascular complications and reduce mortality rate due to cardiovascular disease and other causes. There has also been shown that neutralization of reactive molecules can significantly inhibit the development of endothelial dysfunction, cardiomyopathy, retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy in patients with DM. Recently the use of antioxidants still remains a controversy, but its use as a therapy for DM can be considered because its demonstrated effectiveness in lowering the risk of developing diabetes and its complications. Various antioxidants have been developed for oxidative stress treatment in DM, including the use of vitamins and supplements as well as the use of some components of plants and fresh fruits which have demonstrated antioxidant effect in DM patients. In some recent studies, some drugs routinely used in the treatment of DM also demonstrated antioxidant effects.

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