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Wombourne, United Kingdom

Wang J.,Loughborough University | Gabe D.R.,Loughborough University | Hart A.C.,Hart Materials Ltd | Crouch P.C.,Hart Materials Ltd
Transactions of the Institute of Metal Finishing | Year: 2013

This paper describes work to determine the nature of the cationic species present in the type of nickel solutions used for commercial electroplating and electroforming. The three nickel salts examined - sulphate, chloride and sulphamate - are the ones most commonly used in these processes. Despite the fact that nickel plating was first invented in 1837 and has become an extremely useful part of high technology applications the nature of the species in solution has never been investigated. The purpose of this study is to discover if the differences in deposit properties - particularly internal stress - produced by the three types of nickel salt is determined by the structure of the cationic species and the effect, if any, that the different anionic species have upon the structure of the nickel ions in aqueous solution. © 2013 Institute of Metal Finishing. Source


Dong M.,Loughborough University | Gabe D.R.,Loughborough University | Hart A.C.,Hart Materials Ltd | Crouch P.C.,Hart Materials Ltd
Transactions of the Institute of Metal Finishing | Year: 2014

Measurements of ion conductivity have been made for four nickel solutions used in metal finishing processes but not all commonly for electroplating: chloride, nitrate, acetate and nickel methanesulphonic acid (MSA). Using criteria such as conductivity and Arrhenius plots to compare them with sulphate, chloride and acetate appear to be normal whereas nitrate and MSA have distinct differences. © 2014 Institute of Materials Finishing. Source

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