St. Louis, MO, United States
St. Louis, MO, United States

Harris–Stowe State University is a historically black, public university located in midtown St. Louis, in the U.S. state of Missouri. The University is a member-school of the Thurgood Marshall College Fund. Wikipedia.


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INDIANAPOLIS, IN--(Marketwired - February 08, 2017) - Student Connections(SM), a nonprofit affiliate of USA Funds®, is considering additional colleges and universities for participation in a partnership program that is helping to optimize its latest product, Success Center. The partnership program marks the final development phase of the app-based solution for strengthening nonacademic skills that support college persistence and completion. A diverse group of institutions has joined the program, including Indiana University, Harris-Stowe State University, the University of Missouri - Kansas City, and cuLearn, a division of Thrivent. However, limited positions remain in the innovation partnership program, which affords participating institutions discounted, early access to Success Center. This includes distribution of the "virtual personal assistant" interactive learning app, WhichWay, to members of their student populations. Administrators should contact Stephen Queisser, vice president of Strategic Partnerships for Student Connections, at steve.q@studentconnections.org or (317) 806-0215 for more information about participating. The Success Center concept is based on research conducted with postsecondary institutions around the country. This research was driven by advisory boards of students and academic experts from schools that include Indiana University, Ball State University, Marian University, Western Michigan University, and the University of Dayton. "Understanding the diverse needs of students is imperative in creating meaningful and effective student engagement," said Daniel J. Elsener, president of Marian University. "Success Center offers a novel approach to developing nonacademic skills important to student persistence and graduation, and it is our pleasure to help shape its development." "As college students, we loved being a part of something that will aid and educate other college students in their academic and professional careers," said Nadine Hashem, president of Pi Sigma Epsilon at Ball State University. "Being able to see and participate in the expansion of the WhichWay app from just an idea to an actual digital application is a very rewarding experience, and we cannot wait to see WhichWay in active use." "Our work in helping schools address issues like loan management and default, which can become formidable barriers to the lifetime of opportunities sought by students of higher education, underscores the need for continual innovation," said Craig P. Anderson, president of Student Connections. "We know dropout rates correlate with default rates, so we wanted to create a powerful retention and engagement tool that institutions can use to support student success more proactively than ever before." Success Center offers an interactive, modular approach to developing nonacademic skills, like financial literacy, that are important to academic success. Its technology includes a student engagement app that will function as a "virtual personal assistant" for students, offering dynamic content that is continuously optimized according to their individual needs. For institutions, Success Center creates a cloud-based platform that integrates seamlessly with traditional student outreach while generating the usage data needed for ROI measurement and improvement. Currently available modules focus on helping students successfully manage the demands placed on their personal finances and time. Innovation partner schools will have access to student survey results and other data that yield valuable insights about challenges and opportunities related to nonacademic barriers to successful completion. Administrators will have the opportunity to test prototypes, including new modules, and shape the ongoing development of the program. Recognizing that students follow a variety of paths and encounter different obstacles in their quest for a higher education, Student Connections offers innovative solutions, developed in collaboration with higher education institutions and students, to provide relevant and engaging resources throughout the student life cycle. Student Connections partners with postsecondary institutions to support the success of more than 2.2 million current and former students across more than 900 campuses throughout the U.S. Student Connections is an affiliate of USA Funds and directly supports its nonprofit focus on Completion With a Purpose®, enhancing student success in college and career. For more information about Student Connections, visit studentconnections.org, or follow Student Connections on Twitter at @StuConnections, on Facebook and on LinkedIn.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has analyzed more than a dozen metrics to rank Missouri’s best universities and colleges for 2017. Of the 40 four-year schools on the list, Washington University in St. Louis, Saint Louis University, Maryville University of Saint Louis, William Jewell College and Rockhurst University were the top five. 14 two-year schools also made the list, and State Fair Community College, Crowder College, Jefferson College, East Central College and State Technical College of Missouri were ranked as the best five. A full list of the winning schools is included below. “The schools on our list have created high-quality learning experiences for students in Missouri, with career outcomes in mind,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.Org. “They’ve shown this through the certificates and degrees that they offer, paired with excellent employment services and a record of strong post-college earnings for grads.” To be included on the “Best Colleges in Missouri” list, schools must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also appraised on additional data that includes annual alumni salaries 10 years after entering college, employment services, student/teacher ratio, graduation rate and the availability of financial aid. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Missouri” list, visit: The Best Four-Year Colleges in Missouri for 2017 include: Avila University Baptist Bible College Calvary Bible College and Theological Seminary Central Methodist University-College of Liberal Arts and Sciences College of the Ozarks Columbia College Culver-Stockton College Drury University Evangel University Fontbonne University Hannibal-LaGrange University Harris-Stowe State University Kansas City Art Institute Lincoln University Lindenwood University Maryville University of Saint Louis Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary Missouri Baptist University Missouri Southern State University Missouri State University-Springfield Missouri University of Science and Technology Missouri Valley College Missouri Western State University Northwest Missouri State University Park University Rockhurst University Saint Louis University Southeast Missouri State University Southwest Baptist University Stephens College Truman State University University of Central Missouri University of Missouri-Columbia University of Missouri-Kansas City University of Missouri-St Louis Washington University in St Louis Webster University Westminster College William Jewell College William Woods University Missouri’s Best Two-Year Colleges for 2017 include: Crowder College East Central College Jefferson College Lake Career and Technical Center Mineral Area College Missouri State University - West Plains Moberly Area Community College North Central Missouri College Ozarks Technical Community College St. Charles Community College State Fair Community College State Technical College of Missouri Texas County Technical College Three Rivers Community College About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

NPower officially celebrates the opening of their St. Louis regional office and IT training center today, located on the campus of Harris-Stowe State University, for their renowned technology training and job placement program. The inaugural class of 27 young adults from the St. Louis metropolitan area recently began the accelerated training program which is designed to result in placement in career-track technology jobs. The program has run since 2002 in other markets and has resulted in the placement of thousands of young adults from underserved communities and veterans in jobs in technology. The decision to scale to the St. Louis market was initiated as a result of a substantial financial contribution by Fund II Foundation (F2F) as part of a multi-city development partnership with NPower. NPower St. Louis has also partnered with St. Louis-based technology giant, World Wide Technology (WWT), an NPower National Corporate Underwriter since 2011 to get the program off the ground. “Giving is an integral part of how we operate and how we serve our communities,” said David Steward, Chairman and Founder of WWT. “NPower is a collaborative IT partner, helping ease the burden of recruitment on the business end and giving overlooked young adults the tools to become technology professionals with a great deal of potential for success.” Matt Horner, Vice President and General Manager, US East, Europe & Asia Pacific at WWT, serves as Vice Chairman of NPower’s Board of Directors. St. Louis native, Trina Clark James, was appointed Regional Director of NPower St. Louis in late 2016. “We have worked hard to establish the training program in St. Louis and our partners have been instrumental in helping us recruit staff and students, source equipment and be introduced to other local partners,” said James. She continued, “it truly takes a village to do what we do and we welcome anyone or any organization to join us as we empower the untapped potential that exists in under-resourced and under-represented portions of our community and prepare these exceptional individuals for promising careers in technology.” Staff in St. Louis have been working on building local partnerships with community organizations and leaders to help with recruitment efforts for future program participants and job placement resources for those who will graduate from this first stream in July 2017. As a result of said efforts, NPower St. Louis recently aligned with the St. Louis Regional Business Council (RBC). “A key initiative of the Regional Business Council is to attract and retain diverse professionals in the St. Louis business community,” said Kathy Osborn of the RBC. “We are thrilled that NPower has established a presence in our city in order to provide targeted training to young adults interested in IT careers. The specialized programs that NPower provides not only address the technology skills gaps but also the employment gaps in St. Louis. The creation of career pathways for underserved young adults will benefit those most in need but it will also create a local talent pool that our companies can draw from to meet their hiring needs. NPower is just the right program for today's business needs." NPower St. Louis has also received support from The Rio Vista Fund, Centene Charitable Foundation and Wells Fargo Advisors. The NPower training program is provided free of charge to qualified students. To qualify, individuals must reside in the greater St. Louis area, be between the ages of 18-25, have earned a high school degree or equivalent and be available for 15 weeks of in-class instruction followed by 7 weeks of paid internship work. For direct access to St. Louis recruitment personnel, potential students should email http://mailto:AdmissionsStLouis@NPower.org or visit npower.org for more information. NPower creates pathways to economic prosperity by launching digital careers for military veterans and young adults from underserved communities. We empower under-represented talent to pursue tech futures by teaching the digital and professional skills demanded by the marketplace, and engaging corporations, volunteers and nonprofits in the long-term success of our students. Over 80% of NPower graduates are employed full time or enrolled in higher education within one year of completing our program, which is offered at no cost to qualified students. NPower envisions a future where our domestic technology workforce is diverse, and clear pathways exist for all people regardless of ethnicity, gender, or socio-economic background to succeed in our digital economy. For more information, visit NPower.org and follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. World Wide Technology (WWT) is a technology solution provider with more than $9 billion in annual revenue that provides innovative technology and supply chain solutions to large public and private organizations around the globe. While most companies talk about delivering business and technology outcomes, WWT does it. Based in St. Louis, WWT employs more than 4,000 people and operates over 2 million square feet of warehousing, distribution and integration space in more than 20 facilities throughout the world. For more, visit wwt.com. The Regional Business Council is a consortium of Presidents and Chief Executive Officers representing some of the region’s largest companies. The mission of the RBC is to unite and engage members to act on high-impact business, civic and philanthropic affairs for the betterment of the St. Louis region.


Lundgren A.P.,Syracuse University | Bondarescu M.,University of Mississippi | Bondarescu R.,Pennsylvania State University | Balakrishna J.,Harris-Stowe State University
Astrophysical Journal Letters | Year: 2010

We discuss the thermal evolution and Bose-Einstein condensation of ultralight dark matter particles at finite, realistic cosmological temperatures. We find that if these particles decouple from regular matter before Standard Model particles annihilate, their temperature will be about 0.9 K. This temperature is substantially lower than the temperature of cosmic microwave background neutrinos and thus big bang nucleosynthesis remains unaffected. In addition, the temperature is consistent with WMAP 7-year+BAO+H0 observations without fine-tuning. We focus on particles of mass of m ∼ 10-23 eV, which have Compton wavelength of galactic scales. Agglomerations of these particles can form stable halos and naturally prohibit small-scale structure. They avoid over-abundance of dwarf galaxies and may be favored by observations of dark matter distributions. We present numerical as well as approximate analytical solutions of the Friedmann-Klein-Gordon equations and study the cosmological evolution of this scalar field dark matter from the early universe to the era of matter domination. Today, the particles in the ground state mimic pressureless matter, while the excited state particles are radiation like. © 2010 The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.

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