Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Chūō-ku, Japan

Ohashi I.,Hannan Chuo Hospital
Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy | Year: 2011

We report a rare case of esophageal cancer resection in which lung metastases was resected after chemotherapy with paclitaxel. A 59-year-old man with epigastralgia as a chief concern was referred to our hospital and was diagnosed with esophageal cancer by gastrointestinal fiber. In June 2007, the cancer was resected and followed by 3 courses of weekly chemotherapy with paclitaxel. In January 2009, chest computed tomography showed lung nodules (Rt-S1 and Rt-S5), and positron emission tomography (PET) showed uptake (Rt-S1); a final diagnosis of multiple lung metastases was made. Thereafter, the patient underwent 8 courses of weekly chemotherapy with paclitaxel. In December 2009, the growing Rt-S1 nodule was detected but no other lesion. The patient underwent a resection of lung metastases followed by 5 courses of weekly chemotherapy with paclitaxel. As of June 2011, the patient was alive and disease free. In conclusion, the resection of solitary lung metastases derived from esophageal cancer should be considered because it may improve survival.


We report a rare case of a patient with multiple liver metastases of gastric and rectal cancers after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy, who responded completely to S-1 therapy followed by open gastrectomy. A 72-year-old man with a chief complaint of occult blood in the feces was referred to our hospital and was diagnosed with rectal cancer by colonoscopy. In addition, we found concomitant gastric cancer by gastrointestinal fiberscopy. Abdominal plain computed tomography showed no liver metastasis. In August 2010, we performed laparoscopic resection of the rectal cancer. However, at the time of discharge, abdominal enhanced computed tomography showed multiple liver metastases. Then, we administered 4 courses of S-1 therapy. In December 2010, abdominal enhanced computed tomography showed no liver metastasis. In March 2011, because no other lesion without residual gastric cancer was detected, the patient underwent gastrectomy followed by S-1 therapy. As of January 2012, the patient is alive and disease free. S-1 therapy with laparoscopic resection for rectal cancer and gastrectomy may help prolong the survival of patients with multiple liver metastases of gastric and rectal cancers.


Mizushima T.,Osaka University | Ide Y.,Suita Municipal Hospital | Murata K.,Suita Municipal Hospital | Ohashi I.,Hannan Chuo Hospital | And 13 more authors.
Oncology (Switzerland) | Year: 2013

Objective: Combined chemotherapy with S-1 and irinotecan (IRIS) for metastatic colorectal cancer has been reported to be effective and safe. However, there are only a few studies on the effects of adding bevacizumab to IRIS. We conducted a clinical study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of IRIS plus bevacizumab as first-line therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer. Methods: Forty metastatic colorectal cancer patients were enrolled in this phase II study. All patients received irinotecan (80 mg/m2) and bevacizumab (7 mg/kg) on days 1 and 15 and S-1 (40-60 mg twice daily) on days 1-21 of a 5-week repeated cycle. Results: The response rate was 47.4% [95% confidence interval (CI) 31.5-63.2], progression-free survival was 11.9 months (95% CI 9.4-16.8), and overall survival was 23.4 months (95% CI 19.0-inf). The only grade 3 hematological toxicity was neutropenia (16%) and the incidences of grade 3 nonhematological toxicity were low at <10%, other than diarrhea (10.9%). Conclusion: In this clinical study, we revealed IRIS plus bevacizumab to be a promising first-line regimen for metastatic colorectal cancer with a low incidence of serious toxicities, in which favorable response rates and extension of survival time can be expected. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.


Fukaya M.,Tsurumai Kouen Clinic | Sato K.,Hannan Chuo Hospital | Sato M.,Sato Pediatric Clinic | Kimata H.,Kimata Hajime Clinic | And 3 more authors.
Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety | Year: 2014

The American Academy of Dermatology published a new guideline regarding topical therapy in atopic dermatitis in May 2014. Although topical steroid addiction or red burning skin syndrome had been mentioned as possible side effects of topical steroids in a 2006 review article in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, no statement was made regarding this illness in the new guidelines. This suggests that there are still controversies regarding this illness. Here, we describe the clinical features of topical steroid addiction or red burning skin syndrome, based on the treatment of many cases of the illness. Because there have been few articles in the medical literature regarding this illness, the description in this article will be of some benefit to better understand the illness and to spur discussion regarding topical steroid addiction or red burning skin syndrome. © 2014 Fukaya et al.


Fukaya M.,Tsurumai Kouen Clinic | Sato K.,Hannan Chuo Hospital | Yamada T.,Hannan Chuo Hospital | Sato M.,Sato Pediatric Clinic | And 3 more authors.
Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology | Year: 2016

Topical corticosteroids (TCS) are regarded as the mainstay treatment for atopic dermatitis (AD). As AD has a tendency to heal naturally, the long-term efficacy of TCS in AD management should be compared with the outcomes seen in patients with AD not using TCS. However, there are few long-term studies that consider patients with AD not using TCS. We designed a prospective multicenter cohort study to assess the clinical outcomes in patients with AD who did not use TCS for 6 months and then compared our results with an earlier study by Furue et al which considered AD patients using TCS over 6 months. Our patients’ clinical improvement was comparable with the patients described in Furue’s research. In light of this, it is reasonable for physicians to manage AD patients who decline TCS, as the expected long-term prognosis is similar whether they use TCS or not. © 2016 Fukaya et al.

Discover hidden collaborations