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PubMed | Hangzhou Institute of Dermatology and Venereology
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology : JEADV | Year: 2011

Transplantation of autologous cultured pure melanocytes is a well-established procedure for the treatment of refractory and stabilized vitiligo. However, there was no report specifically comparing the efficacy with the regard to defined age groups (children-adolescence-adult). We analysed the efficacy of this procedure in the treatment of vitiligo in children and adolescents and compare it with the results in adults treated during the same period and using identical procedures.Melanocytes were isolated from the roof of suction blister, cultured and expanded with Hu16 medium in vitro, and transplanted to laser-denuded receipt area. A total of 12 children (8-12 years), 20 adolescents (13-17 years) and 70 adults with vitiligo were treated using this procedure.The patients obtained satisfactory results (repigmentation of 50% or more) results in children, adolescents and adults were 83.3%, 95.0% and 84.0% respectively. The mean extent of repigmentation in children, adolescents and adults was 80.7%, 78.9% and 76.6% respectively. There was no statistical difference in repigmentation among these three groups. After adjusting for all factors (gender, type of vitiligo, period of stability, location of the lesion or transplanted cell density) individually or totally using multiple regression analysis, age still did not correlate to the extent of repigmentation.The satisfactory results obtained in the treatment of vitiligo in children and adolescents by transplantation of cultured autologous pure melanocytes are comparable with the results in adults. Therefore, this procedure can be considered in refractory and stable vitiligo in children and adolescents, especially in patients with large vitiliginous lesions.

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