Hewitt, MN, United States
Hewitt, MN, United States

Hamline University is an American private liberal arts college in Saint Paul, Minnesota, founded in 1854 and named after Bishop Leonidas Lent Hamline of the United Methodist Church. Hamline is the oldest institution of higher learning in Minnesota and one of five Associated Colleges of the Twin Cities.The university comprises five faculties, including Hamline University School of Law, and has an enrollment of 2,100 undergraduate and 2,800 postgraduate students. In 2011, Hamline was first in Minnesota and ninth in the U.S. in the Regional Universities—Midwest category of U.S. News and World Report's college rankings. Linda N. Hanson is the university's 19th president, inaugurated in 2005. Wikipedia.


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News Article | December 23, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The Biophysical Society has announced the winners of its Education Committee Travel Awards to attend the Biophysical Society's 61st Annual Meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana, February 11-15, 2017. The recipients of this competitive award, all of whom are students and postdoctoral fellows, are selected based on scientific merit. Each awardee will be presenting their research during the meeting, will receive a travel grant, and will be recognized at a reception on Saturday, February 11, at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. Mihai Azoitei, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NOVEL BIOSENSOR DESIGN REVEALS THE ROLE AND REGULATION OF GEF-H1 IN CELL MIGRATION. Mouhanad Babi, McMaster University, THE CHARACTERIZATION OF CELLULOSE NANOSTRUCTURE USING SUPER-RESOLUTION FLUORESCENCE MICROSCOPY. Curtis Balusek, Georgia Institute of Technology, CONSTRUCTING AN IN SILICO MODEL OF THE GRAM-NEGATIVE CELLULAR ENVELOPE. Paola Bisignano, University of California, San Francisco, STRUCTURAL INSIGHTS INTO SODIUM-DEPENDENT SUGAR TRANSPORTERS AND THEIR INHIBITION MECHANISM. Breane Budaitis, University of Michigan, THE ROLE OF THE COVER-NECK BUNDLE IN MULTI-MOTOR TRANSPORT AGAINST LOAD IN CELLS. Shirley Chen, University of Michigan, ENGINEERING INHIBITABLE KINESIN-3 MOTORS BY A NOVEL CHEMICAL-GENETIC APPROACH. Saikat Chowdhury, The Scripps Research Institute, USING CRYOEM TO UNDERSTAND HOW PHAGES EVADE BACTERIAL CRISPR DEFENSE SYSTEM. Alexander Chu, California Institute of Technology, TOWARDS A UNIVERSALCHARACTERIZATION OF THE MEMBRANE PROTEIN EXPRESSION LANDSCAPE. Miranda Collier, University of Oxford, EVIDENCE FOR CHAPERONE FUNCTION IN MECHANOSENSATION. Caitlin Cornell, University of Washington, DIRECT IMAGING OF LIQUID DOMAINS BY CRYOTEM IN SUBMICRON VESICLES. Yavuz Dagdas University of California, Berkeley, CONFORMATIONAL DYNAMICS OF CAS9 DURING DNA BINDING. Peter Dahl, University of Michigan, A SUPPORTED TUBULATED BILAYER SYSTEM SHOWS EFFECTS OF SYNAPTOTAGMIN-7 ON MEMBRANE CURVATURE. Russell Davidson, Colorado State University, MOLECULAR ALLOSTERY IN DENGUE NS3 HELICASE ALONG THE ATP HYDROLYSIS CYCLE. Melody Di Bona, Italian Institute of Technology, CHROMATIN ACCESSIBILITY STUDIED BY SLOW SCAN FCS IN THE EUKARYOTIC NUCLEUS. Matthew Dragovich, Lehigh University, INVESTIGATION OF THE RELIABILITY OF AFM NANOINDENTATION-DERIVED MEASUREMENTS OF CELL MECHANICS. Paige Engen, Hamline University, STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF TAU PEPTIDE INTERACTIONS WITH LIPID MEMBRANES USING FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY. CristianEscobar, Florida State University, CONFORMATION PLASTICITY ANDPEPTIDOGLYCAN CLEAVAGE BY THE N-TERMINAL INTRINSICALLY DISORDERED DOMAIN OF CHIZ. Gozde Eskici, University of Pennsylvania, MICROSECOND SIMULATIONS OF AMYLOID BETA FIBRIL NUCLEATION IN REVERSE MICELLES. Emmet Francis, University of California at Davis, SINGLE-CELL INVESTIGATION OFTHE ROLE OF CALCIUM BURSTS IN HUMAN IMMUNE CELLS. Wolfgang Gross, University of Bayreuth, MACROPHAGES ARE SENSITIVE TO SUBSTRATE ELASTICITY DURING PHAGOCYTOSIS. Shubhasis Haldar, Columbia University, TRIGGER FACTOR BOOSTS THE WORK DONE BY PROTEIN FOLDING UNDER FORCE. Alice Herneisen, Swarthmore College, SITE-DIRECTED SPIN LABELING EPR SPECTROSCOPY OF THE CYTOPLASMIC TAIL OF INFLUENZA A M2. Naoto Hori, University of Texas, MULTISTEP FOLDING KINETICS OF GROUP I INTRON RNA STUDIED BY Mg2+-CONCENTRATION JUMP SIMULATIONS. Jesse Howe, CSU San Marcos, EXPANDING THE SCOPE OF SINGLE MOLECULE FRET SPECTROSCOPY TOWARDS PRIMARILY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS. Abir Kabbani, Wayne State University, NANOSCALE MEMBRANE BUDS INDUCED BY CTXB-GM1 IN ONE COMPONENT BILAYER DETECTED BY POLARIZED LOCALIZATION MICROSCOPY (PLM). Shachi Katira, University of California, Berkeley, PRE-TRANSITION EFFECTS MEDIATE FORCES OF ASSEMBLY BETWEEN TRANSMEMBRANE PROTEINS: RECENT RESULTS ON THE ORDERPHOBIC EFFECT. Hema Chandra, Kotamarthi, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, SINGLE-MOLECULE DISSECTION OF THE ROLE OF DIRECTIONALITY IN PROTEIN DEGRADATION BY Clp PROTEOLYTIC MACHINES. Sudipta Lahiri, Wesleyan University, ELUCIDATION OF THE STRUCTURE-FUNCTION RELATIONSHIP OF S. CEREVISIAE MUTS HOMOLOG MSH4 AND MSH5 WITH THE HOLLIDAY JUNCTION. Ying Lai, Stanford University, MUNC13 AND MUNC18 COOPERATE TO PROPERLY ASSEMBLE SNARES FOR FAST NEUROTRANSMITTER RELEASE. Christopher Lee, University of California, San Diego, INVESTIGATING TRANSPORT PROPERTIES WITH MULTI-SCALE COMPUTABLE MESH MODELS FROM HETEROGENEOUS STRUCTURAL DATASETS. Maureen Leninger, New York University, INVESTIGATING THE STRUCTURE OF THE DRUG TRANSPORTER EMRE. Alyssa Lombardi Temple University School of Medicine, GENETIC ABLATION OFFIBROBLAST MITOCHONDRIAL CALCIUM UPTAKE INCREASES MYOFIBROBLASTTRANSDIFFERENTIATION AND EXACERBATES FIBROSIS IN MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION. Victor Pui-Yan Ma, Emory University, RATIOMETRIC TENSION PROBES FOR MAPPING RECEPTOR FORCES AND CLUSTERING AT INTERMEMBRANE JUNCTIONS. Mohammad Mehdi Maneshi, University at Buffalo, SHEAR STRESS STIMULATED MSC ACTIVITIES: DIRECT CHANGES OF MEMBRANE TENSION OR CYTOSKELETALSTRESS? Dipak Maskey, Institute of Medicine, DEGRADATION OF CALPONIN 2 IS REQUIRED FOR CYTOKINESIS. Isha Mehta, Texas Woman's University, PROTEIN ENERGY NETWORK MODELS TO CLASSIFY AND PREDICT FUNCTIONALLY LINKED INTERFACES OF PROTEINS FROM FUNCTIONALLY UNCORRELATED INTERFACES. Paula Morales, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, CONSTRUCTION OF A GPR3 HOMOLOGY MODEL USING CONFORMATIONAL MEMORIES. Medeea Popescu, Wellesley College, EXAMINING THE ROLE OF PHOSPHORYLATION ON INTERACTIONS BETWEEN THE CARDIAC POTASSIUM CHANNEL ALPHA-SUBUNITS HERG AND KVLQT1. Dana Reinemann, Vanderbilt University, SINGLE MOLECULE CHARACTERIZATION OF MITOTIC KIF15 REVEALS CAPABILITY TO GENERATE FORCE IN ANTI-PARALLEL MICROTUBULES. Talant Ruzmetov, Kent State University, EXPLORING THE ROLE OF FLEXIBILITY IN BINDING KINETICS AND AFFINITY OF PKID-KIX THROUGH COARSE GRAINED SIMULATIONS. Kristin Schimert, University of Michigan, INTRACELLULAR CARGO TRANSPORT BY SINGLE-HEADED KINESIN MONOMERS. Digvijay Singh, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, INVESTIGATION OF DNA BINDING, NUCLEOLYSIS AND PRODUCT RELEASE SPECIFICITY OF RNA GUIDED ENDONUCLEASE CRISPR-CPF1 FAMILY REVEALS IMPORTANT DIFFERENCES FROM CAS9-RNA. Kyle Smith, Northwestern University, THE TWO GTPASE DOMAINS OF THE OUTER MITOCHONDRIAL MEMBRANE PROTEIN MIRO HAVE NOVEL ACTIVE SITE CONFORMATIONS AND DISTINCT BIOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES. Kevin Votaw, Colorado State University, INSIGHTS INTO DAMAGED BASE DETECTION BY DNA GLYCOSYLASES: A COMPUTATIONAL STUDY OF ALKD. Sienna Wong, Wayne State University, ENGINEERING OF CHIMERIC PROTEINS TO ENHANCE IMMUNOGENICITY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF HIGH-AFFINITY SPECIFIC MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES. Riley Workman, Duquesne University, CHARACTERIZATION OF THE CONFORMATIONAL ENSEMBLE OF POLYGLUTAMINE PEPTIDES VIA METADYNAMICS MD SIMULATIONS AND UV RESONANCE RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY. Goli Yamini, The Catholic University of America, IMPACT OF DENDRIMER SURFACE CHEMISTRY ON ANTHRAX TOXIN CHANNEL BLOCKAGE: A SINGLE MOLECULE STUDY. Fan Yang, University of California, Davis, RATIONAL DESIGN AND VALIDATION OF A VANILLOID-SENSITIVE TRPV2 ION CHANNEL. Chen-Ching Yuan, University of Miami, DISTINCT LATTICE STRUCTURE ALTREATIONS IN DCM AND HCM MOUSE MODELS ASSOCIATED WITH MUTATIONS IN MYOSIN REGULATORY LIGHT CHAIN. Rebecca Zaunbrecher, University of Washington, GENETICALLY ENGINEERED HUMAN STEM CELL-DERIVED CARDIOMYOCYTES TO STUDY THE FUNCTIONALITY OF CRONOS TITIN. Zhenfu Zhang, University of Toronto, INTERPLAY AMONG BINDING, PHOSPHORYLATION AND DENATURATION IN DISORDERED 4E-BP2 AS PROBED BY SINGLE MOLECULE FLUORESCENCE. Yue Zhang, Mississippi State University, MODELING THE EARLY STAGES OF AGGREGATION IN DISORDERED ELASTIN-LIKE PROTEINS. Haiqing Zhao, University Of Maryland, PROMISCUOUS HISTONE MIS-ASSEMBLY IS ACTIVELY PREVENTED BY CHAPERONES. Chi Zhao, University of Texas at Austin, PLASMA MEMBRANE VESICLES WITH ENGINEERED TRANSMEMBRANE PROTEIN LIGANDS FOR HIGH-AFFINITY CELL TARGETING. The Biophysical Society, founded in 1958, is a professional, scientific Society established to encourage development and dissemination of knowledge in biophysics. The Society promotes growth in this expanding field through its annual meeting, monthly journal, and committee and outreach activities. Its 9000 members are located throughout the U.S. and the world, where they teach and conduct research in colleges, universities, laboratories, government agencies, and industry. For more information on these awards, the Society, or the 2017 Annual Meeting, visit http://www. .


News Article | August 22, 2016
Site: phys.org

The researchers will present their work today at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS). ACS, the world's largest scientific society, is holding the meeting here through Thursday. It features more than 9,000 presentations on a wide range of science topics. "People who don't have access to the best-quality medicines also don't have as many resources to buy the analytical instrumentation to detect the quality problems," says Marya Lieberman, Ph.D. "Instead of a $30,000 instrument, we've developed a $1 paper card. We designed the card so it would be as easy and inexpensive to use as possible." Medications can be compromised in many different ways. For example, they may be bulked up with fillers, or they can degrade because they are stored improperly. Identifying poor-quality medications is challenging, as inspectors may not know in advance what chemical adulterants or degradation products they need to look for. Plus, bad-quality medications may contain at least some of the active ingredient, so simply detecting the presence of the real medication isn't enough to rule out issues. In this study, Lieberman of the University of Notre Dame, along with Hamline University undergraduate Sarah Bliese, developed a card to detect falsified or degraded antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin or ceftriaxone, both of which the World Health Organization lists as "essential." To screen for a variety of potential quality issues, the researchers included 12 lanes separated by wax barriers on the paper device. Each lane contained a different set of reagents to detect materials or functional groups found in active pharmaceutical ingredients, degradation products or common fillers. To run a sample, the researchers crush a pill and rub the resulting powder across all 12 lanes, and then dip the bottom of the paper card in water for three minutes. The water wicks up the lanes, bringing reagents into contact with the powder. Colors are formed when the reagents interact with the pharmaceutical, filler or degradation product. The researchers then compare the color pattern from the sample with the color patterns obtained from high-quality pharmaceutical products. The comparison can be done by eye or with an image-analysis program on a smartphone. Ceftriaxone is sensitive to heat and breaks down if storage temperatures climb too high. As an experiment, the researchers subjected ceftriaxone to high temperatures and ran the card test, simultaneously analyzing the degradation products via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. They verified that the colorimetric pattern for the degraded antibiotic was different from that of the correctly stored product. In addition to these tests on the pure active ingredient, Lieberman and Bliese analyzed dozens of real-world samples of ceftriaxone from Kenya and Uganda. Unscrupulous makers of falsified medication sometimes add colorants containing toxic heavy metals to their products to make the illicit pills more closely resemble their legitimate counterparts, Bliese says. So, in a related project at Hamline University, Bliese and Deanna O'Donnell, Ph.D., are exploring whether a portable X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy device can scan pills for these substances. In June, Lieberman and Bliese traveled to Kenya to test a new paper card which can detect substandard antibiotics. While Lieberman is currently focusing her work on the developing world, she says her cards could be applicable worldwide to perform, for example, the analysis of herbal medicines and nutritional supplements. "Sometimes those 'herbal products' are actually spiked with pharmaceuticals," she explains. "The paper test cards could be a defense against this." Bliese says her next project will be to develop a paper test card to help first responders identify drugs of abuse and differentiate them from household products or legitimate medicines. Explore further: New technology combats global pandemic of drug counterfeiting


Pope T.M.,Hamline University | Pope T.M.,Albany Medical College
Chest | Year: 2012

The four previous articles in this series have traced the history of patient autonomy and have identified its ethical and legal foundations. Patient autonomy is highly valued in the United States to the extent that the patient does not lose the right of self-determination when he or she loses the capacity to make health-care decisions for him or herself. The law has devised several tools to promote "prospective autonomy." One mechanism is the instructional advance directive or living will. But most of us do not write such directives. Another mechanism is the proxy directive or durable power of attorney for health care, designating another person, a surrogate, to direct the course of our medical treatment upon our incapacity. But most of us do not do that either. Therefore, the most common mechanism by which our prospective autonomy is protected and promoted is through the informal selection of surrogates based on statutory priority lists. These "default" surrogates are the most numerous type of surrogate. This article explains the importance and legal fundamentals of surrogate decision making. It first describes five basic types of surrogates. The article then looks at the role of these surrogates and how they are supposed to make decisions on the patient's behalf. Unfortunately, surrogate performance is often mediocre or poor. There are significant and persistent obstacles to good surrogate decision making. After explaining these problems, the article concludes by identifying several solutions. © 2012 American College of Chest Physicians.


Shaw R.G.,University of Minnesota | Shaw F.H.,Hamline University
Heredity | Year: 2014

The additive genetic variance with respect to absolute fitness, V A (W), divided by mean absolute fitness sets the rate of ongoing adaptation. Fisher's key insight yielding this quantitative prediction of adaptive evolution, known as the Fundamental Theorem of Natural Selection, is well appreciated by evolutionists. Nevertheless, extremely scant information about V A (W) is available for natural populations. Consequently, the capacity for fitness increase via natural selection is unknown. Particularly in the current context of rapid environmental change, which is likely to reduce fitness directly and, consequently, the size and persistence of populations, the urgency of advancing understanding of immediate adaptive capacity is extreme. We here explore reasons for the dearth of empirical information about V A (W), despite its theoretical renown and critical evolutionary role. Of these reasons, we suggest that expectations that V A (W) is negligible, in general, together with severe statistical challenges of estimating it, may largely account for the limited empirical emphasis on it. To develop insight into the dynamics of V A (W) in a changing environment, we have conducted individual-based genetically explicit simulations. We show that, as optimizing selection on a trait changes steadily over generations, V A (W) can grow considerably, supporting more rapid adaptation than would the V A (W) of the base population. We call for direct evaluation of V A (W) and in support of prediction of rates adaptive evolution, and we advocate for the use of aster modeling as a rigorous basis for achieving this goal. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved.


Kahn J.,Hamline University
Perspectives in Biology and Medicine | Year: 2011

C. P. Snow's famous Two Cultures essay has become a foil for decades of discussions over the relation between science and the humanities.The problem of the "two cultures" is often framed in terms of how the particular epistemological claims or general intellectual orientations of particular individuals on either side of this purported divide obstruct interdisciplinary dialogue or cooperation. This formulation, however, fails to consider the institutional frameworks within which such debates occur. This article examines the broader structural constraints that provide incentives, erect barriers, or otherwise shape the potential for interdisciplinary research and practice, with particular attention to work involving the life sciences. It argues that in order to understand the nature and scope of the problems facing interdisciplinary work, we must focus on the institutional constraints that shape how individuals frame questions, pursue investigations, develop careers, and collaborate. © 2011 by The Johns Hopkins University Press.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 54.95K | Year: 2014

With this award from the Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) Program and the Chemistry Research Instrumentation Program, Hamline University will acquire a portable X-Ray fluorescence spectrometer. An X-ray fluorescence spectrometer is an analytical tool used to determine the chemical elements in a sample. Because it is portable and hand held, it can be used to analyze samples away from a laboratory, for example in a classroom, at an archeological site, or to examine art objects or cultural heritage materials in museums. The instrument will be shared with researchers at Minnesota State University-Mankato and two non-profit organizations, the Minnesota Historical Society (MHS) and the Midwest Art Conservation Center (MACC). It will be used in undergraduate chemistry courses, a teacher education course and a forensics/anthropology course. It will also be used in high school courses and in elementary school demonstrations. This community outreach includes a large minority student population. The societal benefit includes understanding and preserving cultural artifacts.

The proposal is aimed at enhancing research and education at all levels, especially in areas such as (a) identifying the chemical composition of forensic samples, art and cultural heritage objects; (b) characterizing artifacts for provenience; (c) understanding the influence of the Golgi membrane on the formation of paired-helical fibers (PHFs) from the protein tau; (d) synthesizing aluminum oxide (alumina) nanoparticles; and (e) developing a searchable database for rapid and reliable field use of materials commonly found at crime scenes.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: CONDENSED MATTER & MAT THEORY | Award Amount: 79.99K | Year: 2011

TECHNICAL SUMMARY

This award made on an RUI proposal supports research and education aimed at integrating fundamental concepts in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, molecular biology and population dynamics with the practical skills of Monte Carlo simulations. Under the overarching theme of exploring biology-inspired systems with similar underlying physics, the projects are designed to bring students in contact with cutting edge research topics which exhibit originality, interdisciplinary relevance to their knowledge base and opportunities to hone their programming skills in the context of the study of physical systems.

The specific projects explore:
1.) Protein synthesis in bacteria. During protein synthesis in bacteria, a chain of amino acids is formed when ribosomes move along the mRNA template, translating genetic information from the sequence to functioning proteins. Due to the degeneracy in the genetic code, however, the same protein can be produced by different mRNA sequences with a range of sequence-dependent rates. This process can be studied using a lattice gas model: The totally asymmetric simple exclusion process. The totally asymmetric simple exclusion process is one of the paradigms in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics; it is well suited to be introduced to undergraduate students as their first exposure to this field. The PI plans to explore over 4000 gene sequences in E. coli and the limits on their protein production rates first through Monte Carlo simulations. Using analytic methods, the PI will investigate these rates by mean field theory. The intellectual merits include but are not limited to: Insights on the existence of non-optimal sequences; effects of quenched randomness on the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process; and guidance to experimentalists on fine-tuning mRNA sequence for optimal protein production.
2.) Host-parasite dynamics. Contrary to the ubiquitous applications of the predator-prey model, the host-parasite dynamics model is less systematically explored and fundamentally different. In a simple model, parasites conduct a random walk on a square lattice and reproduce only when encountering a host at the same lattice site. The parasite population is not conserved in the system. As the frequency at which they find the host controls their population, the spatial and temporal distributions of the parasites are intricately connected to that of the host. The PI plans to study the relation between host and parasites in a methodical manner. Preliminary simulations by one of the PIs students suggest that elucidating a non-trivial phase transition from unstable to steady state parasite population may be possible. The other avenues of study include a comprehensive description on the host-parasite-like interactions and potential applications in epidemics control.

The PI intends to establish a quality research program in a primarily undergraduate institution. This award supports eight undergraduate students and creates an ideal backdrop for them to learn a number of subjects, including: cell biology, non-equilibrium statistical physics, formulation of mathematical models, and high performance computation, that are absent from traditional physics curricula.


NON-TECHNICAL SUMMARY

This award made on an RUI proposal supports theoretical research and education at the interface of the statistical mechanics of systems that are far from the balance of equilibrium, molecular biology and population dynamics while integrating the practical skills of Monte Carlo computer simulations. Under the overarching theme of exploring biology-inspired systems with similar underlying physics, the projects are designed to bring students in contact with cutting edge research topics which exhibit originality, interdisciplinary relevance to their knowledge base and opportunities to hone their computer programming skills in the context of the study of familiar physical systems.

The specific projects use the quantitative tools of statistical physics to explore: a) the protein synthesis process in bacteria, for example E.Coli, through a particle transport model, and b) the host-parasite dynamics, inspired by flea infestation in household pets, using Monte Carlo simulations and analytical approaches. Focused on examples of microscopic and macroscopic systems in biology respectively, both projects share a unifying theme: each involves the study of a complex system of many components and rich features that may be illuminated by applying the tools of statistical physics. In the process, the theory of statistical mechanics for systems far from the balance of equilibrium is advance. Such a theory will have wide applicability from biological systems to materials processing. The former project is expected to provide insights into the existence of non-optimal gene coding sequences in bacteria. The latter is intended to provide a comprehensive description of some host-parasite-like interactions and may have potential applications in epidemics control.

The PI intends to establish a quality research program in a primarily undergraduate institution. This award supports eight undergraduate students and creates an ideal backdrop for them to learn a number of subjects, including: cell biology, non-equilibrium statistical physics, formulation of mathematical models, and high performance computation, that are absent from traditional physics curricula.


News Article | October 29, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Hamline University Political Science Professor David Schultz contends that the presidential election may be over no later than 7:30 eastern time on election day. Professor Schultz, author of Presidential Swing States: Why Only Ten Matter, argues that the 2016 election will be decided by a handful of swing voters in about 15 counties located in 10 states. According to Schultz: “There are very few competitive states in presidential elections and among those in 2016, some of them will see their polls close early on election night. What happens in three states in particular–Florida, North Carolina, and Ohio–will tell us who the next president of the United States will be.” According to Schultz, for Donald Trump to win the presidency, he has to win all of the states Mitt Romney won in 2012, which included North Carolina. But in addition, Trump has to win Florida and Ohio to win the presidency. All three of these states have early poll closings, with Florida at 7:00 PM eastern, followed by North Carolina and Ohio at 7:30. Trump effectively needs to win all three of these states to become president. If he loses any of them he probably cannot win, but if he loses two or even all three the race is effectively over. But Schultz argues that even within these three states there are three counties that can tell us a lot about what will happen, even before election day as early voting occurs. In Florida, whoever wins Hillsborough Country (Tampa area) likely wins Florida. In Ohio, Hamilton County (Cincinnati area) results will predict the winner in Ohio, and in North Carolina, Wake County (Raleigh area) results will determine North Carolina. Generally over the last few elections, whoever wins in those counties wins those states. “Look to see how swing voters go in those swing counties in those three states. They will tell us how the election is breaking in those states and across the country,” says Schultz. “If they are breaking for Clinton in early voting and on Election Day, then early on election night we will know whether Trump has any chance of winning. If they do not break for him there then his chances of winning are nearly impossible.” David Schultz is a professor of political science at Hamline University in St Paul, Minnesota. He has taught classes on American government and election law for more than 25 years. Schultz, a three time Fulbright scholar and winner of the Leslie A. Whittington national award for excellence in public affairs teaching, is the author and editor of 30 books and 100 articles on American politics and law.


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: marketersmedia.com

EDEN PRAIRIE, MN / ACCESSWIRE / November 15, 2016 / ECA Marketing announced its recent hire of Mark Eide, who will join the ECA Marketing team as General Counsel and Chief Compliance Officer working from our office in Eden Prairie, MN. Within these roles, Eide will assist agent producers with annuity suitability review, provide general compliance consulting, create and implement policies and procedures and provide advertising review. Eide came to ECA Marketing as an industry leader in suitability procedures. Prior to accepting the roles as General Counsel, Mark maintained a private law practice where he focused on consulting for SEC exams and investment advisory compliance programs and representation of registered representatives at FINRA arbitrations. Before private practice, Mark held a series of compliance and operational positions at several major Broker Dealers and Registered Investment Advisors including the position of Chief Compliance Officer at one of the largest independent retail Broker Dealers and federally registered Investment Advisors in the United States. In additional to his prior experience, Mark has been a member or leader of major securities compliance roundtables and has been a national speaker and panelist on the topics of ERISA and general securities compliance. Mark has a degree in Finance from St. Cloud State University and Juris Doctorate from Hamline University School of Law. While in law school, Mark was a two-time national moot court competitor on the topic of civil rights. Joe Spillman, President of ECA Marketing says, "I am excited to welcome Mark to our team here at ECA Marketing. His compliance and legal experience is wonderful but to find someone with such a great understanding of sales and marketing in the insurance and financial services world made him a perfect fit for ECA. As our company works hard to create new and unique marketing and sales initiatives for our producers we believe Mark's skillset will not only help ensure compliance requirements are met, but also preserve our business friendly nature." ECA Marketing has roots dating back to 1985. Since 2006, ECA Marketing has produced over $10 Billion in Fixed Annuity and Target Life Premium. Joe Spillman became president of ECA Marketing in December 2011. He started as a marketing consultant in 1999. ECA Mission is to create quality sales platforms and systems for producers to help them write more business and select the best products to fit within that system. ECA is dedicated to giving superior service, as well as devoted to developing and attaining industry tools specifically designed to help our producers save time and effort by offering valuable insurance resources. EDEN PRAIRIE, MN / ACCESSWIRE / November 15, 2016 / ECA Marketing announced its recent hire of Mark Eide, who will join the ECA Marketing team as General Counsel and Chief Compliance Officer working from our office in Eden Prairie, MN. Within these roles, Eide will assist agent producers with annuity suitability review, provide general compliance consulting, create and implement policies and procedures and provide advertising review. Eide came to ECA Marketing as an industry leader in suitability procedures. Prior to accepting the roles as General Counsel, Mark maintained a private law practice where he focused on consulting for SEC exams and investment advisory compliance programs and representation of registered representatives at FINRA arbitrations. Before private practice, Mark held a series of compliance and operational positions at several major Broker Dealers and Registered Investment Advisors including the position of Chief Compliance Officer at one of the largest independent retail Broker Dealers and federally registered Investment Advisors in the United States. In additional to his prior experience, Mark has been a member or leader of major securities compliance roundtables and has been a national speaker and panelist on the topics of ERISA and general securities compliance. Mark has a degree in Finance from St. Cloud State University and Juris Doctorate from Hamline University School of Law. While in law school, Mark was a two-time national moot court competitor on the topic of civil rights. Joe Spillman, President of ECA Marketing says, "I am excited to welcome Mark to our team here at ECA Marketing. His compliance and legal experience is wonderful but to find someone with such a great understanding of sales and marketing in the insurance and financial services world made him a perfect fit for ECA. As our company works hard to create new and unique marketing and sales initiatives for our producers we believe Mark's skillset will not only help ensure compliance requirements are met, but also preserve our business friendly nature." ECA Marketing has roots dating back to 1985. Since 2006, ECA Marketing has produced over $10 Billion in Fixed Annuity and Target Life Premium. Joe Spillman became president of ECA Marketing in December 2011. He started as a marketing consultant in 1999. ECA Mission is to create quality sales platforms and systems for producers to help them write more business and select the best products to fit within that system. ECA is dedicated to giving superior service, as well as devoted to developing and attaining industry tools specifically designed to help our producers save time and effort by offering valuable insurance resources.


News Article | December 14, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Minnesota court reporting firm Depo International has had a busy couple of weeks and is entering the new year with multiple events planned as part of their commitment to serving clients to the best of their ability and remaining active across the area. The Minnesota Paralegal Association held its December Litigation Sectional at the firm of Nilan Johnson Lewis on Wednesday, December 7 with Stephen Arnott, Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Legal Education at Hamline University, who spoke on Advanced Legal Research. The insightful presentation gave way to valuable conversations about the value of checking sources. Depo International also connected with the area community with another December event as they partnered with NightOwl Litigation Services to host the Hennepin County Bar Association wine event on Wednesday, December 7 at Henry & Son. This was an excellent opportunity to connect with local attorneys while tasting unique Spanish wines. On December 13, Depo International took part in the Twin Cities Legal Employees Education Association’s holiday event at The Dakota Jazz Club, enjoying festive music and conversations with area professionals. On December 20th, Depo International will be back out in the community networking with administrative legal professionals in NALS at the annual Holiday Lunch and Ornament Exchange at the Oak Grill. The Women in eDiscovery (WiE) holiday party and silent auction is January 25, 2017, at the Shindig Event Space. The theme this year is Snow & Sparkles and a silent auction will help fund the various community service activities of the group in 2017. If you would like to donate an item to the auction, please contact the Community Service Chair, DeAnne Brooks, at deanne(at)depointernational(dot)com. Depo International, with offices in Minneapolis, Chicago, Las Vegas and Houston, has a strong reputation for court reporting and video services throughout the United States and abroad. Services include legal videography, web video conferencing, international scheduling, realtime court reporting writing to iPads, and comprehensive deposition assistance. Making use of their extensive experience in the field of court reporting, all deposition needs are addressed seamlessly for the best possible experience for the attorneys involved, including features such as paperless exhibits, an online repository, 5-day transcript turnaround, audio transcription, on-call reporters for those last minute needs, and an in-house video studio. Depo International has been recognized across the country as the Trial Lawyer’s Choice for legal support, legal videography services, and court reporting. Working with professional staff all dedicated to a high level of customer service, Depo International works hard to provide timely and accurate solutions for those needing deposition help. To learn more about the services they offer, visit http://depointernational.com/.

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