Findlay, OH, United States
Findlay, OH, United States

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Rossi W.,Texas A&M University | Newcomb M.,Hamlet Protein Inc. | Gatlin D.M.,Texas A&M University
Aquaculture | Year: 2016

We assessed the nutritional value of an enzymatically processed soybean meal (HP300, Hamlet Protein Inc., Findlay, Ohio, USA; hereafter ESBM) in the diet of red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus. A digestibility and two growth trials (Trials I and II) were conducted to: i) assess the in vivo digestibility of ESBM and commodity soybean meal (SBM); ii) assess the maximum replacement of the digestible protein (DP) from fishmeal (FM) with ESBM (MAX REPLESBM); iii) validate the estimated MAX REPLESBM and compare it against SBM. All experimental diets were formulated to contain 32% DP, 12% lipid, and an estimated 13.8kJg-1 digestible energy. Seven experimental diets were designed in Trial I: a FM reference diet (FM-100), designed to contain all its protein from Special Select menhaden FM; and six test diets designed to replace the DP from FM in the FM-100 diet on a isonitrogenous basis, at 15% incremental levels (ESBM-15 to ESBM-90). Each diet was fed to juvenile red drum (5.72g) in duplicate aquaria connected as a closed recirculating system. After 6weeks of feeding, responses of red drum fed the various diets differed considerably, with survival ranging from 78 to 95%, final weight from 24.5 to 40.0g, weight gain (% of initial) from 330 to 597%, and feed efficiency (FE) from 0.7 to 1.0. Second order polynomial regression analysis of weight gain and FE data indicated a MAX REPLESBM of 72 and 63%, respectively. After feeding the FM-100, ESBM-70, and a SBM-70 diets to juvenile red drum (1.7g) in Trial II (8weeks, n=3), no differences in production performance of fish were found among treatments. These results indicated that either ESBM or SBM can replace up to 70% of FM DP in the diet of early juvenile red drum without detrimental effects on production performance. Statement of relevance: The currently study represents an addition to the increasing number of studies evaluating alternative protein sources in the diet of carnivorous fish species. We used red drum as a model and demonstrated the applicability of soybean products as partial substitutes for dietary fishmeal. Once replicated under commercial production settings, our results will contribute for a more sustainable aquaculture industry. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.


Beloshapka A.N.,Urbana University | de Godoy M.R.C.,Urbana University | Detweiler K.B.,Urbana University | Newcomb M.,Hamlet Protein Inc. | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Animal Science | Year: 2016

Animal proteins are commonly used in extruded dog foods. Plant-based proteins have a more consistent nutrient profile than animal sources but may contain antinutritional factors, including trypsin inhibitors and oligosaccharides. Bioprocessed soy protein (SP; HP-300; Hamlet Protein, Inc., Findlay, OH) is a processed soy-based product with low antinutritional factor concentrations and high protein quality. The objective was to evaluate the effects of SP on apparent total tract macronutrient digestibility, fecal characteristics, and fecal fermentative end products. Furthermore, this study aimed to identify if SP can be a replacement for poultry byproduct meal (PBPM) in dog food and determine if there are practical limits to its use. Three palatability experiments were conducted to evaluate 1) 0 vs. 12% SP, 2) 0 vs. 48% SP, and 3) 12 vs. 48% SP. For digestibility, 48 healthy adult Beagle dogs (20 females and 28 males; 3.4 yr mean age and 10.0 kg mean BW) were randomly allotted to 1 of 6 dietary treatments, 0 (control), 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48% SP, in a completely randomized design. All diets were formulated to meet Association of American Feed Control Officials nutrient profiles and contained approximately 30% CP and 16% fat. The treatment period consisted of a 10-d diet adaptation phase followed by a 4-d fresh and total fecal collection phase. The palatability results suggest that of the 3 inclusion levels tested (0, 12, or 48% SP), the best inclusion of SP is 12%, which was preferred over 0 and 48% SP. Digestibility and fecal data were evaluated for linear and quadratic effects using SAS. Stool output (on both an as-is and a DM basis) did not differ from the control except for the 48% SP treatment (P < 0.01). Fecal output per unit food intake differed (P < 0.01) from the control only at the 24 and 48% SP inclusion rates. No significant effects of feeding SP were found on stool consistency scores. Digestibility of DM, OM, and energy did not differ from the control at any inclusion rate, except for a decrease (P < 0.01) at 48% SP. Apparent total tract CP digestibility was not affected by treatment and ranged from 82.9 to 86.2%. Fecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations were greater (P < 0.01) in dogs fed 24 and 48% SP compared with the control. Conversely, branched-chain fatty acid concentrations were lower (P < 0.01) in dogs fed 8 to 48% SP compared with the control. These data suggest that SP is a suitable replacement for PBPM in dog diets up to a 24% inclusion level. © 2016 American Society of Animal Science. All rights reserved.

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