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Hamilton, Canada

Hamilton Health science is a medical group of six unique hospitals and a cancer centre located in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Wikipedia.


Warkentin T.E.,McMaster University | Warkentin T.E.,Hamilton Health Sciences
Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis | Year: 2015

Many critically ill patients receive heparin, either before intensive care unit (ICU) admission (e.g., postcardiac surgery), for prophylaxis/treatment of thrombosis, for hemodialysis/filtration, or even incidentally (e.g., flushing of intravascular catheters), and are therefore at risk for developing immune heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT), a prothrombotic drug reaction caused by platelet-activating antiplatelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin antibodies. However, HIT explains at most 1 in 100 thrombocytopenic ICU patients (HIT frequency 0.3-0.5% vs. 30-50% background frequency of ICU-associated thrombocytopenia), and most patients who form anti-PF4/heparin antibodies do not develop HIT; hence, HIT overdiagnosis often occurs. This review discusses HIT-related issues relevant to ICU patients, including how to (1) distinguish HIT both clinically and serologically from non-HIT-related thrombocytopenia; (2) recognize HIT-mimicking disorders, such as the acute disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)/liver necrosis-limb necrosis syndrome; (3) prevent HIT in the ICU through use of low-molecular-weight heparin; and (4) treat HIT, including awareness of PTT confounding when anticoagulating patients with DIC. Copyright © 2015 by Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc., 333 Seventh Avenue, New York. Source


Vege S.S.,Mayo Medical School | Ziring B.,Thomas Jefferson University | Jain R.,Texas Digestive Disease Consultants | Moayyedi P.,Hamilton Health Sciences
Gastroenterology | Year: 2015

This article has an accompanying continuing medical education activity on page e12. Learning Objective: At the conclusion of this exercise, the learner will understand the approach to counseling patients regarding the optimal method and frequency of radiologic imaging, indications for invasive tests like endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) and surgery, select patients for follow-up after surgery, decide the duration of such follow-up, and decide when to stop surveillance for those with and without surgery. © 2015 by the AGA Institute. Source


Nunes M.C.P.,Federal University of Minas Gerais | Dones W.,Ryder Memorial Hospital | Morillo C.A.,Hamilton Health Sciences | Encina J.J.,Hospital Universitario Japones | Ribeiro A.L.,Federal University of Minas Gerais
Journal of the American College of Cardiology | Year: 2013

Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is a serious health problem in Latin America and is an emerging disease in non-endemic countries. In recent decades, the epidemiological profile of the disease has changed due to new patterns of immigration and successful control in its transmission, leading to the urbanization and globalization of the disease. Dilated cardiomyopathy is the most important and severe manifestation of human chronic Chagas disease and is characterized by heart failure, ventricular arrhythmias, heart blocks, thromboembolic phenomena, and sudden death. This article will present an overview of the clinical and epidemiological aspects of Chagas disease. It will focus on several clinical aspects of the disease, such as chronic Chagas disease without detectable cardiac pathology, as well as dysautonomia, some specific features, and the principles of treatment of chronic cardiomyopathy. © 2013 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation Published by Elsevier Inc. Source


Connolly B.,Hamilton Health Sciences | Fox S.H.,University of Toronto
Neurotherapeutics | Year: 2014

Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and add significantly to the burden of disease. These symptoms are most commonly part of the disease spectrum owing to pathological changes within relevant brain regions. Neuropsychiatric problems include disorders of cognition, ranging from mild cognitive impairment to dementia, psychotic symptoms, including, most commonly, well-formed visual hallucinations and paranoid delusions, and mood disorders, such as depression and anxiety. The other common cause of neuropsychiatric problem is secondary to use of dopaminergic drugs. Some PD patients may develop behavioral disorders, including impulse control disorders (ICDs) and addictive symptoms. Psychosis can be due to a mixture of underlying pathology, with triggering or worsening of symptoms with changes to PD medications. Currently, management of these disorders primarily uses therapies developed for general psychiatry and cognitive neurology, rather than specifically for PD. However, significant adverse effects, such as worsening of the motor symptoms of PD, can limit use of some drug therapies. Identification of drug-induced symptoms, such as ICDs, enables withdrawal of the offending drug as the principal management strategy. Research is ongoing in an effort to develop more specific therapies for PD-related neuropsychiatric symptoms. © 2013 The American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics, Inc. Source


Connolly B.S.,Hamilton Health Sciences | Lang A.E.,Morton and Gloria Movement Disorders Center | Lang A.E.,University of Toronto
JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association | Year: 2014

IMPORTANCE: Parkinson disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease worldwide. Although no available therapies alter the underlying neurodegenerative process, symptomatic therapies can improve patient quality of life. OBJECTIVE: To provide an evidence-based review of the initial pharmacological management of the classic motor symptoms of Parkinson disease; describe management of medication-related motor complications (such as motor fluctuations and dyskinesia), and other medication adverse effects (nausea, psychosis, and impulse control disorders and related behaviors); and discuss the management of selected nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson disease, including rapid eyemovement sleep behavior disorder, cognitive impairment, depression, orthostatic hypotension, and sialorrhea. EVIDENCE REVIEW: References were identified using searches of PubMed between January 1985 and February 2014 for English-language human studies and the full database of the Cochrane Library. The classification of studies by quality (classes I-IV) was assessed using the levels of evidence guidelines from the American Academy of Neurology and the highest-quality data for each topic. RESULTS: Although levodopa is the most effective medication available for treating the motor symptoms of Parkinson disease, in certain instances (eg, mild symptoms, tremor as the only or most prominent symptom, aged <60 years) other medications (eg, monoamine oxidase type B inhibitors [MAOBIs], amantadine, anticholinergics, β-blockers, or dopamine agonists) may be initiated first to avoid levodopa-related motor complications. Motor fluctuations may be managed by modifying the levodopa dosing regimen or by adding several other medications, such as MAOBIs, catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors, or dopamine agonists. Impulse control disorders are typically managed by reducing or withdrawing dopaminergic medication, particularly dopamine agonists. Evidence-based management of some nonmotor symptoms is limited by a paucity of high-quality positive studies. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Strong evidence supports using levodopa and dopamine agonists for motor symptoms at all stages of Parkinson disease. Dopamine agonists and drugs that block dopamine metabolism are effective for motor fluctuations and clozapine is effective for hallucinations. Cholinesterase inhibitors may improve symptoms of dementia and antidepressants and pramipexole may improve depression. Evidence supporting other therapies for motor and nonmotor features is less well established. Copyright 2014 American Medical Association. All rights reserved. Source

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