Hamilton, Canada

Hamilton Health Sciences

www.hhsc.ca/
Hamilton, Canada

Hamilton Health science is a medical group of six unique hospitals and a cancer centre located in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Wikipedia.

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HAMILTON, ONTARIO--(Marketwired - Aug. 4, 2017) - Battered by years of provincial funding and care cuts and showing the obvious signs of system distress from overcapacity and not enough staff and ambulances, Hamilton hospitals announced recently that more services will be shed to balance budgets. $20 million will be cut from Hamilton Health Sciences' (HHS) budget and may mean dozens more care staff will be eliminated in 2017. Another $7 million will be chopped from the St. Joseph's Health Care budget. "Hamilton's hospitals are running at dangerously high levels of overcrowding, result of years of underfunding by the Wynne government," says Natalie Mehra, executive director of the Ontario Health Coalition (OHC). "We are hearing from patients who are waiting on stretchers in hallways and suffering cancelled surgeries because of the cuts that have already occurred. This community cannot take any more cuts and we will be organizing to rise up and stop them." Joining Mehra for a media conference on Tuesday, August 8, 2017 at 10 a.m. at 795 King Street East, Hamilton, are Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) 7800 president Dave Murphy and Michael Hurley, president of the Ontario Council of Hospital Unions (OCHU/CUPE). They will review the impact on Hamilton's patients of Ontario's purposeful shrinking of its hospital system and cutting beds and services, despite a growing and aging population. With not enough hospital beds, HHS currently has occupancy rates of over 110 per cent. Last winter OCHU/CUPE called on the Ontario government to fully fund additional permanent hospital beds to deal with the consistent surge in patients. CUPE polled people in Hamilton in January 2017 and asked them about their support for hospital cutbacks. 93 per cent opposed cuts to Hamilton hospitals. 91 per cent believed that the provincial government should increase funding for Hamilton hospitals. OHC is the largest public interest group on health care in Ontario. It has successfully stopped the closure of hospital birthing units and emergency departments across the province and rolled back user fees for patients. CUPE represents over 10,000 nurses, trades, administrative cleaning and support staff at hospitals in the Hamilton region.


News Article | July 18, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Beryl Institute announces 2017 Patient Experience Regional Roundtables to be held in Hamilton (Ontario, Canada), Palo Alto (California), Westchester (New York) and New Orleans (Louisiana). Expanding the dialogue around patient experience performance, the one-day events draw on the knowledge of the healthcare community to share insight supporting patient experience efforts at their own organizations to improve the experience of patients, their families and caregivers. In addition to hands-on learning opportunities, each roundtable offers inspiring keynote presentations to spark discussion and dialogue. New this year, each roundtable will have a panel of patient experience leaders from across the care continuum in discussion around a specific patient experience topic. The Ontario roundtable will be held September 15 at Hamilton Health Sciences and features Marcus Engel, author and founder of I’m Here Movement. After being blinded and severely injured by a drunk driver, Engel will share his dramatic story and inspire healthcare professionals to reignite their passion for providing excellent patient care. The Palo Alto roundtable will be held September 28 at Stanford Health Care and features Kristen Terlizzi, co-founder of the National Accreta Foundation and a survivor of Placenta Percret. As a speaker and advocate for maternal health and patient safety, Terlizzi will share her story and help participants recognize the value and healing impact of compassionate care. The Westchester roundtable will be held October 23 at The New Jewish Home and features Sven Gierlinger, chief experience officer of Northwell Health. As a previous Ritz-Carlton Hotel executive, Gierlinger brings a unique perspective to the patient experience dialogue. However, it was his personal patient experience spending three months in hospitals that motivates him to challenge the status quo in the continuum of care. The New Orleans roundtable will be held November 6 at Ochsner Medical Center and features Victoria Baskett, founder and president of the Victoria Baskett Patient Safety Foundation. As an advocate for patients and families serving as active and involved members of their healthcare team, Baskett will discuss the importance of shifting the dialogue of communication with compassion at the forefront. Each roundtable offers unique perspectives and lessons around improving patient experience for healthcare professionals at all levels. Participants will make connections with other patient experience leaders, be inspired to continue the journey to improve patient experience and take away new ideas to enhance their organization’s patient experience efforts. “The roundtable events reinforce the important point that we are all in this together. We may not have all the answers to the patient experience challenges we face, but, through this collaboration, people have the opportunity to think creatively and collectively in building practical strategies and solutions,” said Deanna Frings, Vice President, Learning and Professional Development of The Beryl Institute. To register and learn more about The Beryl Institute’s Patient Experience Regional Roundtables, visit: http://www.theberylinstitute.org/?page=RegRoundtables. About The Beryl Institute: The Beryl Institute is the global community of practice dedicated to improving the patient experience through collaboration and shared knowledge. We define the patient experience as the sum of all interactions, shaped by an organization’s culture, that influence patient perceptions across the continuum of care.


News Article | July 27, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

HAMILTON, ONTARIO--(Marketwired - July 27, 2017) - $27 million in cuts will seriously undermine an already over-stretched hospital system. Cuts announced yesterday of $20 million at HHS (Hamilton Health Sciences) and $7 million at St. Joseph's Hospital corporations will seriously undermine hospitals already operating over capacity, CUPE charged today. "HHS is operating now at over 110 per cent capacity, which speaks to the need of a 10 per cent budget increase, not a $20 million funding cut," said Dave Murphy, president of CUPE Local 7800, which represents 4,000 staff at HHS. "There is no question that beds and staff will have to be cut to achieve this purely mathematical target set by the provincial government, which will be achieved on the backs of the Hamiltonians who won't get access to the acute care services they need." Hospitals in Ontario operate with the fewest beds and staff to population of any province in the country. They have the shortest length of stay. "The Hamilton hospitals are over-capacity at levels well beyond what would be considered dangerous and unsafe in Britain, where anything over 85 per cent is seen as heightening the risk of medical error and hospital acquired infection. HHS and St. Joseph's are seriously underfunded and have endured 8 years of cuts, during which their budgets have been reduced by 25 per cent in real terms. The community will not stand by while the government guts these hospitals. We will certainly do everything in our power to organize support for a special infusion of funding," said Michael Hurley, president of CUPE's Ontario Council of Hospital Unions.


The government's plan is to close 5 entire community hospitals in Niagara in the communities of Welland, Port Colborne, Fort Erie, Niagara-on-the-Lake and Niagara Falls. They claim that they will build one hospital to replace all five, on the southern outskirts of Niagara Falls. The Welland hospital services the medical needs of 100,000 Welland and area residents. Our campaigns have pushed back plans, but the currently-proposed ambulatory care centre to replace the hospital will not provide in-patient health care services, emergency care, nor complex and acute care. It will not be a hospital. In addition, plans to totally close the hospitals and a number of urgent care centres in South Niagara are still in the works. The Niagara-on-the-Lake hospital has already been closed as a hospital. Plans for any new hospital are not concrete and will take a decade or more, if they ever materialize. In addition, there are plans to close 2 entire hospitals in Hamilton and dramatically restructure all the hospitals around the Hamilton-to-Niagara region. The Grimsby hospital (West Lincoln Memorial) was swallowed up by Hamilton Health Sciences after the provincial government axed the new hospital in that community that it had previously approved. These changes along with the cuts in Niagara will dramatically impact access to care for millions of people in the Hamilton Niagara region. The hospital closures must be stopped and restructuring plans deserve full scrutiny and public debate. May 31, 2017: Media Event: At the Provincial Legislature, Queen's Park, Ontario (North Doorss)


The government's plan is to close 5 entire community hospitals in Niagara in the communities of Welland, Port Colborne, Fort Erie, Niagara-on-the-Lake and Niagara Falls. They claim that they will build one hospital to replace all five, on the southern outskirts of Niagara Falls. The Welland hospital services the medical needs of 100,000 Welland and area residents. Our campaigns have pushed back plans, but the currently-proposed ambulatory care centre to replace the hospital will not provide in-patient health care services, emergency care, nor complex and acute care. It will not be a hospital. In addition, plans to totally close the hospitals and a number of urgent care centres in South Niagara are still in the works. The Niagara-on-the-Lake hospital has already been closed as a hospital. Plans for any new hospital are not concrete and will take a decade or more, if they ever materialize. In addition, there are plans to close 2 entire hospitals in Hamilton and dramatically restructure all the hospitals around the Hamilton-to-Niagara region. The Grimsby hospital (West Lincoln Memorial) was swallowed up by Hamilton Health Sciences after the provincial government axed the new hospital in that community that it had previously approved. These changes along with the cuts in Niagara will dramatically impact access to care for millions of people in the Hamilton Niagara region. The hostipals closures must be stopped and restructuring plans deserve full scrutiny and public debate. May 31, 2017: Media Event: At the Provincial Legislature, Queen's Park, Ontario (North Doorss)


News Article | August 10, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Study highlights the importance of public health messaging to South Asian women who are considering pregnancy Hamilton, ON (Aug. 10, 2017) - South Asian women in Ontario are at high risk for gestational diabetes, but a change in diet and pre-pregnancy weight could make a significant difference, according to a new study from McMaster University. The research study, called the South Asian Birth Cohort (START), is led by Sonia Anand, professor of medicine at McMaster's Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine and senior scientist at the Population Health Research Institute of Hamilton Health Sciences and McMaster University. The study revealed up to one-third of pregnant South Asian women in Ontario develop gestational diabetes. As well, pre-pregnancy weight and low-quality diet accounted for 37 per cent of the risk of gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is an issue as it may cause type 2 diabetes in the mother and baby, and newborns have increased birthweight, higher body fat and lower insulin sensitivity. The study results were published on August 10 in CMAJ Open. "Our study suggests that if South Asian women could achieve an optimal pre-pregnancy weight and improve their diet quality, approximately one-third of gestational diabetes in this demographic could be prevented," said Anand, who is also a cardiologist and director of the Chanchlani Research Centre at McMaster. Research was based on data from the START Birth Cohort study, which includes more than 1,000 women in their second trimester of pregnancy from Ontario's Region of Peel. The START Study collected health information, physical measurements and a glucose tolerance test from the women. Birth weight, skinfold thickness and cord blood glucose and insulin were obtained from the newborns. Major determinants for gestational diabetes among this group of women included both factors such as age, family history of type 2 diabetes and maternal height, as well as modifiable factors like pre-pregnancy weight and low-diet quality. A low-quality diet was characterized by higher consumption of meat (red, chicken and processed), rice and fried foods, and was lower in raw or cooked vegetables. A high-quality diet was associated with higher consumption of vegetables, legumes and whole grain breads. Anand says the study highlights the importance of public health messaging to South Asian women who are considering pregnancy. "To our knowledge, such messaging regarding pre-pregnancy weight and diet quality is not routinely provided by primary care physicians or public health specialists, and requires an integrated approach involving primary health-care sector and policy initiatives," she said. "Intervention studies are needed to determine if lowering pre-pregnancy weight and optimizing diet quality during pregnancy can reduce the high rates of gestational diabetes in this high-risk population." START data was collected as part of a research program funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the Indian Council for Medical Research (ICMR) and the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada. Editors: Attached is a photo of Sonia Anand, professor of medicine at McMaster's Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine and senior scientist at the Population Health Research Institute of Hamilton Health Sciences and McMaster University. Anand is also a cardiologist and director of the Chanchlani Research Centre at McMaster.


News Article | August 10, 2017
Site: www.realwire.com

Washington D.C, August 2017: Hamilton Health Sciences (HHS), the only hospital system in Ontario, Canada, providing specialty care to people throughout the entire life cycle, from pre-birth to old age, have chosen to strategically partner with Axios Systems by selecting their leading IT Service Management (ITSM) tool, assyst. Headquartered in Hamilton, Ontario, HHS has five hospital sites and five specialized healthcare facilities across the Hamilton and West Niagara region. HHS has one of the largest hospital-based workforces in Ontario with 15,000 staff, physicians and volunteers and is the largest single employer in the Hamilton region. For the past several years, HHS has been highly-ranked on the Research Infosource's Top 40 Hospitals in Canada list.[1] In late 2016, HHS determined their ITSM solution was no longer meeting their requirements. They needed a tool that was more intuitive and easier to use for staff and clients, allowing for increased end user flexibility and less administrative overhead. Unavoidable customizations, a lack of a clear process implementation roadmap and complex upgrades were also highlighted pain points. Hamilton Health Sciences’ decision to choose assyst was based on the product’s capacity to provide an intuitive, ease-of-use experience, as well as its ability to configure versus customize, provide a clear implementation roadmap and schedule seamless upgrades. Axios’s demonstrated success as a strategic ITSM partner with their existing customers was also vital in the decision process. Kareem Toni, ‎Director, HITS Client Services at Hamilton Health Sciences said: “As HHS had partnered with our previous ITSM vendor for 18 years, we were looking for a strong and lasting relationship with our vendor of choice. Axios Systems demonstrated their strong partnership capabilities through their long-standing customer relationships and Customer Success Program. We look forward to working with them for many years to come.” Markos Symeonides, Executive Vice President at Axios Systems commented: “We are delighted to welcome Hamilton Health Sciences to the Axios family, as well as expand our footprint in Canada and the healthcare sector. Having similar business values, I have no doubt we will build a successful and long-term partnership with this prestigious organization.” About Hamilton Health Sciences Hamilton Health Sciences is Ontario’s most comprehensive healthcare system with five hospital sites and five specialized facilities in Hamilton and West Niagara. HHS operates McMaster Children’s Hospital (located within McMaster University Medical Centre, which also includes women's health and adult outpatient care), Hamilton General Hospital, Juravinski Hospital and Cancer Centre, St. Peter's Hospital and West Lincoln Memorial Hospital. Hamilton Health Sciences’ 15,000 staff, physicians, researchers and volunteers serve the health needs of approximately 2.3 million residents of Hamilton, Central South and Central West Ontario, from pre-birth to end-of-life. HHS is both a community hospital as well as a regional center for an array of acute care services, including: cardiac, stroke, cancer, trauma, burns, neurosciences and pediatrics. HHS is the largest employer in the Hamilton area. As an academic teaching hospital with more than 1,100 beds and an affiliation with McMaster University and Mohawk College, HHS is committed to providing exemplary health care while advancing excellence in education and health research. Hamilton Health Sciences has earned recognition as one of the world’s leading health sciences research organizations. About Axios Systems For almost 30 years, Axios Systems has been committed to delivering innovative IT Service Management (ITSM) and IT Asset Management (ITAM) solutions that help customers not only improve their infrastructure operations, but also enhance service delivery across business functions, including HR, Facilities Management and Finance. Axios is recognized as a world leader by leading analysts and their global client base, with a 100% focus on service management technologies. Axios’s enterprise software, assyst, is purpose-built to transform IT departments into profitable business-focused customer service teams. assyst adds tangible value to each client’s organization by building on the ITIL® framework to help solve their business challenges. assyst is accredited for all 16 PinkVERIFY™ ITIL® processes, and Axios was the first vendor to achieve this within a single solution. For more information, please visit our website at http://www.axiossystems.com


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Hamilton, ON (May 23, 2017) - Probiotics may relieve symptoms of depression, as well as help gastrointestinal upset, research from McMaster University has found. In a study published in the medical journal Gastroenterology (May 2), researchers of the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute found that twice as many adults with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) reported improvements from co-existing depression when they took a specific probiotic than adults with IBS who took a placebo. The study provides further evidence of the microbiota environment in the intestines being in direct communication with the brain said senior author Dr. Premysl Bercik, an associate professor of medicine at McMaster and a gastroenterologist for Hamilton Health Sciences. "This study shows that consumption of a specific probiotic can improve both gut symptoms and psychological issues in IBS. This opens new avenues not only for the treatment of patients with functional bowel disorders but also for patients with primary psychiatric diseases," he said. IBS is the most common gastrointestinal disorder in the world, and is highly prevalent in Canada. It affects the large intestine and patients suffer from abdominal pain and altered bowel habits like diarrhea and constipation. They are also frequently affected by chronic anxiety or depression. The pilot study involved 44 adults with IBS and mild to moderate anxiety or depression. They were followed for 10 weeks, as half took a daily dose of the probiotic Bifidobacterium longum NCC3001, while the others had a placebo. At six weeks, 14 of 22, or 64%, of the patients taking the probiotic had decreased depression scores, compared to seven of 22 (or 32%) of patients given placebo. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) showed that the improvement in depression scores was associated with changes in multiple brain areas involved in mood control. "This is the result of a decade long journey - from identifying the probiotic, testing it in preclinical models and investigating the pathways through which the signals from the gut reach the brain," said Bercik. "The results of this pilot study are very promising but they have to be confirmed in a future, larger scale trial," said Dr. Maria Pinto Sanchez, the first author and a McMaster clinical research fellow. The study was performed in collaboration with scientists from Nestlé. For more information: Veronica McGuire Media Relations Faculty of Health Sciences McMaster University vmcguir@mcmaster.ca 905-525-9140, ext. 22169


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Probiotics may relieve symptoms of depression, as well as help gastrointestinal upset, research from McMaster University has found. In a study published in the medical journal Gastroenterology, researchers of the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute found that twice as many adults with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) reported improvements from co-existing depression when they took a specific probiotic than adults with IBS who took a placebo. The study provides further evidence of the microbiota environment in the intestines being in direct communication with the brain said senior author Dr. Premysl Bercik, an associate professor of medicine at McMaster and a gastroenterologist for Hamilton Health Sciences. "This study shows that consumption of a specific probiotic can improve both gut symptoms and psychological issues in IBS. This opens new avenues not only for the treatment of patients with functional bowel disorders but also for patients with primary psychiatric diseases," he said. IBS is the most common gastrointestinal disorder in the world, and is highly prevalent in Canada. It affects the large intestine and patients suffer from abdominal pain and altered bowel habits like diarrhea and constipation. They are also frequently affected by chronic anxiety or depression. The pilot study involved 44 adults with IBS and mild to moderate anxiety or depression. They were followed for 10 weeks, as half took a daily dose of the probiotic Bifidobacterium longum NCC3001, while the others had a placebo. At six weeks, 14 of 22, or 64%, of the patients taking the probiotic had decreased depression scores, compared to seven of 22 (or 32%) of patients given placebo. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) showed that the improvement in depression scores was associated with changes in multiple brain areas involved in mood control. "This is the result of a decade long journey -- from identifying the probiotic, testing it in preclinical models and investigating the pathways through which the signals from the gut reach the brain," said Bercik. "The results of this pilot study are very promising but they have to be confirmed in a future, larger scale trial," said Dr. Maria Pinto Sanchez, the first author and a McMaster clinical research fellow.


Connolly B.S.,Hamilton Health Sciences | Lang A.E.,Toronto Western Hospital | Lang A.E.,University of Toronto
JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association | Year: 2014

IMPORTANCE: Parkinson disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease worldwide. Although no available therapies alter the underlying neurodegenerative process, symptomatic therapies can improve patient quality of life. OBJECTIVE: To provide an evidence-based review of the initial pharmacological management of the classic motor symptoms of Parkinson disease; describe management of medication-related motor complications (such as motor fluctuations and dyskinesia), and other medication adverse effects (nausea, psychosis, and impulse control disorders and related behaviors); and discuss the management of selected nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson disease, including rapid eyemovement sleep behavior disorder, cognitive impairment, depression, orthostatic hypotension, and sialorrhea. EVIDENCE REVIEW: References were identified using searches of PubMed between January 1985 and February 2014 for English-language human studies and the full database of the Cochrane Library. The classification of studies by quality (classes I-IV) was assessed using the levels of evidence guidelines from the American Academy of Neurology and the highest-quality data for each topic. RESULTS: Although levodopa is the most effective medication available for treating the motor symptoms of Parkinson disease, in certain instances (eg, mild symptoms, tremor as the only or most prominent symptom, aged <60 years) other medications (eg, monoamine oxidase type B inhibitors [MAOBIs], amantadine, anticholinergics, β-blockers, or dopamine agonists) may be initiated first to avoid levodopa-related motor complications. Motor fluctuations may be managed by modifying the levodopa dosing regimen or by adding several other medications, such as MAOBIs, catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors, or dopamine agonists. Impulse control disorders are typically managed by reducing or withdrawing dopaminergic medication, particularly dopamine agonists. Evidence-based management of some nonmotor symptoms is limited by a paucity of high-quality positive studies. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Strong evidence supports using levodopa and dopamine agonists for motor symptoms at all stages of Parkinson disease. Dopamine agonists and drugs that block dopamine metabolism are effective for motor fluctuations and clozapine is effective for hallucinations. Cholinesterase inhibitors may improve symptoms of dementia and antidepressants and pramipexole may improve depression. Evidence supporting other therapies for motor and nonmotor features is less well established. Copyright 2014 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.

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