Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Verma C.,Institute of Foreign Trade and Management | Nanda S.,P.A. College | Singh R.K.,Uttarakhand Technical University | Singh R.B.,Halberg Hospital and Research Center | And 2 more authors.
Open Nutraceuticals Journal | Year: 2011

Biotechnology offers a variety of potential benefits and risks. It has enhanced food production by making plants less vulnerable to drought, frost, insects, and viruses and by enabling plants to compete more effectively against weeds for soil nutrients. In a few cases, it has also improved the quality and nutrition of foods by altering their composition. However, the use of biotechnology has also raised concerns about its potential risks to the environment and people. For example, some people fear that common plant pests could develop resistance to the introduced pesticides in GM crops that were supposed to combat them. Genetic engineering provides a means to introduce genes into plants via mechanisms that are different in some respects from classical breeding. A number of commercialized, genetically engineered (GE) varieties, most notably canola, cotton, maize and soybean, were created using this technology, and at present the traits introduced are herbicide and/or pest tolerance. Gene technology enables the increase of production in plants, as well as the rise of resistance to pests, viruses, frost, etc. Gene transfer is used to modify the physical and chemical composition and nutritional value of food. Gene transfer in animals will play a part in boundless possibilities of improving qualitative and quantitative traits. The yield, carcass composition and meat characteristics the use of nutritive substances? not sure what is being said here?, and resistance to diseases can be improved. On the other hand, negative effects of gene technology on animals, human, and environment should be considered. The present review article is the compilation of various studies that present both positive and negative impacts of genetically modified food on human health. © Verma et al.; Licensee Bentham Open. Source


Mishra S.,IFTM University | Singh R.B.,Halberg Hospital and Research Center
Open Nutraceuticals Journal | Year: 2013

Biotechnological discoveries and inventions have been observed to improve food production qualitatively as well as quantitatively. In certain specific cases, the improvement in the quality and nutrition of foods by altering their composition were also monitored. However, the practice of biotechnology has also upraised concerns about its potential risks to the environment as well as human being. Genetic Engineering provides resources to host genes into plants via mechanisms, different in some respects from classical breeding. A number of genetically engineered variety of foods have been developed, which have become important nutraceuticals; most notably canola, cotton, maize and soybean, were developed employing this modern technology, and at present the traits introduced are herbicide and/or pest tolerance. Gene technology leads to increase the production in plants, as well as the elevation of resistance to pests, viruses, frost, etc. Gene transfer technology is employed to alter the physical and chemical composition with nutraceutical worth. The present review article is the compilation of various physiological and biochemical studies reflecting both positive and negative ecological concerns of genetically modified foods. © Mishra and Singh; Licensee Bentham Open. Source


Srivastava R.,IFTM | Srivastava R.,Integral University | Sharma R.,Integral University | Mishra S.,IFTM | And 2 more authors.
Open Nutraceuticals Journal | Year: 2011

Oral cancer is the cancerous tissue growth located in the oral cavity. It may arise as a primary lesion originating in any of the oral tissues, by metastasis from a distant site of origin, or by extension from a neighboring anatomic structure, such as the nasal cavity or the maxillary sinus. Smoking and other tobacco use are associated with about 75 percent of oral cancer cases. Alcohol use is another high-risk activity associated with oral cancer. Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV), particularly type 16 (there are over 120 types), is a known risk factor and independent causative factor for oral cancer. Oncogenes, gain-of-function mutations of highly regulated normal cellular counterparts (proto-oncogenes), are likely involved in the initiation and progression of oral neoplasia. Cellular oncogenes were initially discovered by the ability of tumor cell DNA to induce transformation in gene transfer assays. Mechanisms of activation of these cellular oncogenes include point mutations and DNA re-arrangements. Several of these cellular oncogenes are homologs of retroviral oncogenes (e.g., the ras genes); others are new oncogenes. Tumor suppressor genes or anti-oncogenes have been documented to confer potent negative regulatory controls which are lost due to chromosomal alterations during tumor formation. Functional loss of multiple tumor suppressor genes is believed to be the major event leading to the development of malignancy. Treatment is done till date with the help of radiation therapy, considering the removal of tumor which proceeds with the surgery. Chemotherapy is also used but not to a wide extent and that too has to be done with radiation and research work is still going on the drug discovery for this disease, hence looking towards this fact we opted for the work in this area looking into the successful way of the treatment for oral cancer. The present review is compilation of the data pertaining to biochemistry and molecular biology of oral carcinoma and would certainly provide new insights to explore the development of nutraceuticals based on the hypothesis projected by future studies on computational biotechnology of oral carcinoma. Source


Srivastava R.,IFTM University | Srivastava R.,Integral University | Sharma R.,Integral University | Singh R.B.,Halberg Hospital and Research Center | And 2 more authors.
Open Nutraceuticals Journal | Year: 2012

Oral cancer is the uncontrolled tissue growth observed in the oral cavity. It may arise as a consequence of metastasis and/or by extension from a neighboring anatomic structure, such as the nasal cavity or the maxillary sinus. In view of putative biochemical exploration on oral carcinoma and development of certain nutraceuticals viz. omega 3 versus 6 fatty acids, cancer protective vitamins, probiotics, antioxidants, oral enzymes and mineral mainly selenium based on the hypothesis projected by non-conventional laboratory study, the present work on molecular dynamics of oral cancer was undertaken. The data thus obtained provide new insights into exploring major biochemical and/or molecular markers probably involved in diagnostics as well as therapeutics concerned with the oral carcinoma. © Srivastava et al. Source


Dwivedi N.,Institute of Engineering and Technology | Dwivedi N.,Indian Council of Medical Research | Mishra B.N.,Institute of Engineering and Technology | Singh R.B.,Halberg Hospital and Research Center | Katoch V.M.,Indian Council of Medical Research
Open Nutraceuticals Journal | Year: 2011

The comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) based on three dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies were carried out employing, natural terpenes as potent antimycobacterial agents. The best prediction were obtained with a CoMFA standard model (q2 = 0.569, r2 = 0.999) using steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic and hydrogen bond donor fields. In the current study, a 3D QSAR model of natural product terpenes and their related derivative as antimycobacterial agents was developed. The resulted model exhibits wide-ranging in vitro potency towards Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) from 0.25 μg/ml saringosterol through 200 μg/ml diaporthein A. In order to establish structure-activity relationships, 3D-QSAR studies were carried out using CoMFA for natural terpenes (secondary metabolite of plant origin products) as potent antitubercular agents. The in vitro Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) data against M. tuberculosis (Mtb) were used. The study was conducted using twenty four compounds. A QSAR model was developed using a training set of sixteen compounds and the predictive ability of the QSAR model was assessed employing a test set of eight compounds. The resulting contour maps produced by the best CoMFA models were used to identify the structural features relevant to the biological activity in this series of natural terpenes. © Dwivedi et al.; Licensee Bentham Open. Source

Discover hidden collaborations