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Hakubaku Co. | Date: 2013-03-01

Fermented soybeans (Natto). Tea; oolong tea; black tea; tea of salty kelp powder (Konbu-cha); mugi-cha roasted barley tea; Japanese green tea; udon noodles (uncooked); oat flakes; oatmeal; dried cooked-rice; uncooked enriched rice; pasta-wrappings for gyoza; corn flakes; powder of sweetened bean jam (Sarashi-an); uncooked artificial rice; uncooked spaghetti; somen noodles; instant udon noodles; instant soba noodles; instant Chinese noodles; uncooked soba noodles; uncooked Chinese noodles; bean-starch noodles (Harusame, uncooked); bread crumb; uncooked Chinese rice noodles (Bifun); dried pieces of wheat gluten (Fu, uncooked); canned cooked rice; uncooked macaroni; pounded rice cakes (Mochi); cooked Chinese stuffed dumplings (Gyoza, cooked); Chinese steamed dumplings (Shumai, cooked); sushi; fried balls of batter mix with small pieces of octopus (Takoyaki); prepared box lunches consisting primarily of cereal products; ravioli; yeast powder; fermented rice for food (Koji); yeast; baking powder; husked barley; flour for food; Japanese arrowroot powder (Kudzu-ko, for food); wheat flour for food; rice flour for food; corn starch for food; sago palm starch for food; sweet potato starch for food; potato flour for food; buckwheat flour for food; tapioca flour for food; corn flour for food; pulse flour for food; barley flour for food; gluten additives for culinary purposes. Fresh vegetables; sugar crops, namely, sugar cane, unprocessed sugar beet; fresh fruits; unprocessed foxtail millet; unprocessed proso millet; unprocessed sesame seeds; unprocessed buckwheat; unprocessed corn; unprocessed Japanese barnyard millet; unprocessed wheat, barley and oats; unprocessed rice; unprocessed sorghum; seeds and bulbs; live trees; grass seed; natural turf; dried flowers; seedlings; saplings; natural flowers; pasture grass seed; potted dwarfed trees in the nature of bonsai.


Yokomichi H.,Yamanashi University | Matsuoka T.,Hakubaku Company Ltd | Ayuzawa N.,Hakubaku Company Ltd | Suzuki K.,Yamanashi University | And 4 more authors.
Japanese Pharmacology and Therapeutics | Year: 2015

Background Overeating is a common problem for humans in modern life. One option to decrease food intake is to consume plant-derived polyphenols during meals. Because studies have observed impaired digestion and absorption in farm animals fed sorghum, sorghum tea, containing rich polyphenols, may be suitable for this purpose at meals. We performed a randomized controlled trial to explore the utility of sorghum tea in lowering postprandial plasma triglyceride levels. Methods In a crossover manner, 22 participants were provided sorghum tea, water, or oolong tea while eating their breakfast soup. Plasma triglyceride levels were measured every hour at 0∼6 h after the meal. Mean triglyceride levels in the sorghum tea group were compared with those in the water and oolong tea groups. Results Mean triglyceride levels among the sorghum tea, water, and oolong tea groups were 75.9 mg/dL, 70.6 mg/dL, and 80.1 mg/dL at 4 h, respectively, and 66.8 mg/dL, 58.8 mg/dL, and 58.0 mg/dL at 6 h after breakfast, respectively. No statistically significant difference in triglyceride levels was observed between drinking sorghum tea and water/oolong tea at meals. Conclusions Sorghum contains rich polyphenols that prevent triglyceride digestion and absorption in the small intestine; thus, its utility as another functional food to help reduce weight should be further investigated. Source


Yokomichi H.,Yamanashi University | Matsuoka T.,Hakubaku Company Ltd | Ayuzawa N.,Hakubaku Company Ltd | Suzuki K.,Yamanashi University | And 4 more authors.
Japanese Pharmacology and Therapeutics | Year: 2015

Background Several health foods are available in the market for their ability to mitigate modern high-calorie diets. Coffee and many kinds of teas are expected to reduce calories and help control body weight because these beverages contain rich polyphenols (tannins, flavonoids and cate-chins). Sorghum tea is available in the market as such a beverage, but there is little literature about its health benefits. The aim of this study was to explore the favourable human health effects and to confirm the safety of drinking sorghum tea daily. Methods This study compared indexes about human health before and after a 90-day trial of drinking of 1 L of sorghum tea each day in five women and four men. Results The mean changes after the long-term intake of sorghum tea were -0.2kg/m2 (P= 0.45) for body mass index, -2.0% (P=0.01) for percent body fat and -6.6mg/dL (P<0.01) for fasting plasma glucose. No severe adverse events were reported. Conclusions We observed a statistically non-significant reduction in body mass index and statistically significant reductions in percent body fat and fasting plasma glucose levels after a 90-day trial of drinking sorghum tea daily. These results illuminate a new use for sorghum tea as a beverage to control body fat and plasma glucose. Source

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