Time filter

Source Type

Lu F.,China Academy of Tropical Agriculture science | Lu F.,Laboratory of Integrated Pest Management on Tropical Crops | Lu F.,Hainan Key Laboratory for Monitoring and Control of Tropical Agricultural Pests | Lu F.,Hainan Engineering Research Center for Biological Control of Tropical Crops Diseases and Insect Pests | And 18 more authors.
Experimental and Applied Acarology | Year: 2014

Mononychellus mcgregori is a pest mite of cassava. Since its invasion into China in 2008 it has spread rapidly. In order to determine the potential distribution and to analyze its invasion, diffusion and ecological adaptation mechanisms, we investigated the effect of high-temperature stress (30, 33, 36, 39 and 42 °C) on its development and reproduction, and the activity of protective enzymes in the mite. The results indicated significant influences: (1) adults could not lay eggs after they had been exposed to 42 °C for 4 h or longer; (2) egg development was slower and egg hatchability decreased after exposure of adults to 33-42 °C for 1 h; (3) offspring development (all stages) was slower after exposure of adults to 33-42 °C for 2 h or more; and (4) polyphenol oxidase (PPO), peroxidase (POD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and catalase (CAT) activities in the adults increased to high levels after exposure to 33-42 °C for 1 h, and superoxide dismutase activity increased only after exposure to 42 °C for 1 h. In conclusion, exposure to high temperatures for only 1 h probably has an important impact on the mite's population growth. The significant increase of PPO, POD, APX, and CAT activities in adults may partially explain how M. mcgregori survive exposure to a relatively high temperature. © 2014 Springer International Publishing Switzerland.


Lu F.,Chinese Academy of Sciences | Lu F.,Laboratory of Integrated Pest Management on Tropical Grops | Lu F.,Hainan Key Laboratory for Monitoring and Control of Tropical Agricultural Pests | Lu F.,Hainan Engineering Research Center for Biological Control of Tropical Crops Diseases and Insect Pests | And 24 more authors.
Experimental and Applied Acarology | Year: 2016

Systematic research or technical support regarding rubber germplasm resistance against mites was not performed yet. To develop a preliminary understanding of the mite-resistance mechanisms of rubber germplasms, stably resistant rubber germplasms were obtained, the development and reproduction of Eotetranychus sexmaculatus that fed on leaves of resistant and susceptible rubber germplasms were examined in the laboratory, and the activities of protective enzymes in this mite species were also compared. The results indicated that: (1) among the 23 rubber core germplasms identified, five (IRCI12, Reyan87-6-5, IAN717, RRIM600 and RRIC52) steadily developed resistance to E. sexmaculatus; (2) E. sexmaculatus that fed on the highly resistant germplasm IRCI12 did not complete development and reproduction—the female adults laid only 4.90 eggs on average, and none of these eggs hatched; (3) the resistant germplasms extended the duration of each developmental stage, reduced the fecundity, egg hatchability, and female offspring percentage, and significantly decreased the offspring survival rate compared with the susceptible germplasms; and (4) during each developmental stage of the mites that fed on resistant rubber germplasms, decreased activities (by 0.25-fold to 0.63-fold times) of the protective enzymes peroxidase, ascorbate peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase were observed compared with those in the mites that fed on susceptible rubber germplasms (P < 0.05). These findings may explain why E. sexmaculatus did not complete their development and reproduction on the resistant rubber germplasms. This study lays a foundation for elucidation of the mechanism of rubber resistance to mites and provides experimental material and technical support for the breeding of mite-resistant rubber plants. © 2016 Springer International Publishing Switzerland

Loading Hainan Engineering Research Center for Biological Control of Tropical Crops Diseases and Insect Pests collaborators
Loading Hainan Engineering Research Center for Biological Control of Tropical Crops Diseases and Insect Pests collaborators