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The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome Dawn E. Huggins-Jones, MD, FACOG, OBGYN to their prestigious organization with her upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. Dr. Dawn E. Huggins-Jones is a highly trained and qualified gynecologist and women’s health care provider with an extensive expertise in all facets of her work. She has been in practice for more than three decades, and is currently serving patients within Family Medical Practitioners located in Virginia Beach, Virginia. Dr. Huggins-Jones’ career in medicine began when she graduated from Hahnemann University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Upon receiving her Medical Degree, she completed an internship at Long Island Jewish Medical Center, before undertaking her residency training at Long Island Jewish Medical Center with completion of her training at St. Vincent’s Medical Center of Richmond. Dr. Huggins-Jones is certified by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and has earned the coveted title of Fellow of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. She is well known in the Hampton Roads area of Virginia  as an expert in gynecology, women’s health and weight loss, and has previously shared her wealth of experience by training medical students and residents at Cornell University and Downstate University in New York City. Dr. Huggins-Jones attributes her success to loving what she does and using her vast experiences, including surviving breast cancer, in helping her patients. In her free time, she enjoys dancing and zumba as a means to being active and to stay fit. Learn more about Dr. Huggins-Jones here: http://www.familymedicalpractitioners.com/ and be sure to read her upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics.  Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit http://www.findatopdoc.com


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome Dr. M.L. Ray Kuretu, MD, Cardiothoracic Surgeon to their prestigious organization with his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. Dr. Kuretu holds close to 40 years of experience and a vast expertise in all facets of his work, especially thoracic surgery and adult cardiothoracic surgery. Dr. Kuretu is currently serving patients at Beebe Healthcare in Lewes, Delaware. Dr. Kuretu’s career in medicine began when he graduated with his Medical Degree from Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tenn. Following his graduation, Dr. Kuretu completed his residency at Youngstown HosptialAssocoation in Youngstown, Ohio,followed by Fellowships in cardiothoracic surgery at Shadyside Hosptial in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and Newark Beth Israel Hospital in Newark, New Jersey. He also did a residency in cardiothoracic surgery at Hahnemann University Hospital in Philadelphia Pennsylvania as well as completing a year of Senior Registrar at Brooke General Hospital and Guy’s Hospital in London, England. Dr. Kuretu is certified by the American Board of Thoracic Surgery, and keeps up to date with the latest advances and developments in his field through his professional membership with The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Dr. Kuretu has taught for 30 years, and attributes his great success to his attention to detail. When he is not attending to his patients, Dr. Kuretu dedicates his free time to playing golf. Learn more about Dr. Kuretu by reading his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics.  Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit http://www.findatopdoc.com


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome Democleia Panagou Gottesman, MD, Gastroenterologist, to their prestigious organization with her upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. Dr. Democleia Panagou Gottesman is a highly trained and qualified physician with an extensive expertise in all facets of her work. Dr. Gottesman has been in practice for more than 20 years and is currently serving patients within Star Medical Offices in Brooklyn, New York. She is also affiliated with New York Methodist Hospital and Queens Medical Center. Dr. Gottesman graduated Magna Cum Laude from Tarkio College, prior to completing her Master’s Degree in Biochemistry at the University of Iowa. She then attended Hahnemann University School of Medicine where she graduated with her Medical Degree, before completing her Internal Medicine residency and Gastroenterology fellowship at the Cabrini Medical Center. Dr. Gottesman is double board certified in Internal Medicine and in Gastroenterology, and maintains a professional membership with the American College of Physicians. Dr. Gottesman is dedicated to providing her patients with the highest level of quality and compassionate care. She provides general consultations, disease screenings, colonoscopy, endoscopy, and gastroscopy. Dr. Gottesman also provides treatment to her patients suffering from nausea, constipation, ulcers, hemorrhoids, acid reflux, and stomach pain. She attributes her success to her hard work, and when she is not working, Dr. Gottesman enjoys playing golf and traveling. Learn more about Dr. Gottesman here: http://www.starmedicaloffices.com/ and be sure to read her upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics.  Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit http://www.findatopdoc.com


News Article | December 22, 2016
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

NEW YORK, NY, December 22, 2016-- Rosemary A. Stevens has been included in Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.Recognized for more than five and a half decades of invaluable contributions to her field, Dr. Stevens parlays her extensive knowledge into her role with the University of Pennsylvania, where she has been professor emeritus since 2002. Prior to entering the field in a professional capacity, she earned a Bachelor of Arts from Oxford University and a diploma in social administration from Manchester University. After graduating, she transitioned between various hospital administrative positions in England until 1961. The next year, she started a six-year stint as a research associate for Yale University Medical School, during which time she earned a Master of Public Health and a Ph.D. from the university. Dr. Stevens proceeded to spend three years as an assistant professor at Yale, before taking on the role of associate professor for an additional three years. In 1974, she assumed her final role with Yale University Medical School as a professor of public health.Starting in 1976, Dr. Stevens transferred her academic role to Tulane University, where she worked for two years as a professor in the department of health systems management and political science and as a chairman of the department of health systems management. Since 1979, she has worked in a plethora of roles with the University of Pennsylvania, including professor of history and sociology of science, chairman of the department, UPS Foundation professor, dean of the School of Arts and Sciences, and Stanley I. Sheerr professor. During her time there, she earned two honorary doctorates from Hahnemann University and Northeastern Ohio University College of Medicine, as well as a Doctor of Science from Rutgers University.A member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Dr. Stevens has parlayed her knowledge into an array of creative works. Notably, she authored two different editions of , "Medical Practice in Modern England: The Impact of Specialization and State Medicine," as well as "American Medicine and the Public Interest," and "In Sickness and In Wealth: American Hospitals in the Twentieth Century." This December, she will be releasing another book called, "A Time of Scandal." As a testament to her stellar work, Dr. Stevens received a number of accolades, including the Frohlich Medal from the Royal Society of Medicine, the James A. Hamilton Book Award from the American College of Healthcare Executives, and the Arthur Viseltear Award from the American Public Health Association. In addition, she had the honor of being named to Who's Who Among Human Service Professionals, Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare, and Who's Who of American Women. Looking ahead, Dr. Stevens intends to experience continued growth and success.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis now publishes many Who's Who titles, including Who's Who in America , Who's Who in the World , Who's Who in American Law , Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare , Who's Who in Science and Engineering , and Who's Who in Asia . Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome Henrietta Fridman, MD, Internist, to their prestigious organization with her upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. She is a highly trained and qualified internist with a vast expertise in all facets of her work, especially general internal medicine and geriatrics. Dr. Fridman has been in practice for more than 26 years and is currently serving patients at Doylestown Health in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. Furthermore, she is affiliated with Doylestown Hospital. Dr. Henrietta Fridman received her Medical Degree in 1990 from the Kaunas Medical Institute of the Lithuanian University of Health Sciences in Kaunas, Lithuania. An internship then followed at Allegheny University of the Health Sciences in Philadelphia, prior to completing residencies at Drexel University College of Medicine and Hahnemann University Hospital. Dr. Fridman is certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine, and maintains a professional memberships with the American Medical Association. She attributes her success to her love of medicine, as it has always been her dream to work in medicine. When she is not assisting patients, Dr. Fridman enjoys listening to music, playing the piano, and singing. Learn more about Dr. Fridman by reading her upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics.  Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit http://www.findatopdoc.com


News Article | March 31, 2016
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

Surgeons in Baltimore for the first time have transplanted organs between an HIV-positive donor and HIV-positive recipients, a long-awaited new option for patients with the AIDS virus whose kidneys or livers also are failing. Johns Hopkins University announced Wednesday that both recipients are recovering well after one received a kidney and the other a liver from a deceased donor - organs that ordinarily would have been thrown away because of the HIV infection. Doctors in South Africa have reported successfully transplanting HIV-positive kidneys but Hopkins said the HIV-positive liver transplant is the first worldwide. Hopkins didn't identify its patients, but said the kidney recipient is recuperating at home and the liver recipient is expected to be discharged soon. "This could mean a new chance at life," said Dr. Dorry Segev, a Hopkins transplant specialist who pushed for legislation lifting a 25-year U.S. ban on the approach and estimates that hundreds of HIV-positive patients may benefit. For patients who don't already have the AIDS virus, nothing changes - they wouldn't be offered HIV-positive organs. Instead, the surgeries, performed earlier this month, are part of research to determine if HIV-to-HIV transplants really help. The reason: Modern anti-AIDS medications have turned HIV from a quick killer into a chronic disease - meaning patients may live long enough to suffer organ failure, either because of the HIV or for some other reason. In the U.S., HIV-positive patients already are eligible to receive transplants from HIV-negative donors just like anyone else on the waiting list. That list is long - for kidneys, more than 100,000 people are in line - and thousands die waiting each year. There's no count of how many of those waiting have HIV, but Segev said it increases the risk of death while waiting. If the new approach works, one hope is that it could free up space on the waiting list as HIV-positive patients take advantage of organs available only to them. Segev estimated that 300 to 500 would-be donors who are HIV-positive die each year, potentially enough kidneys and livers for 1,000 additional transplants. "It increases the pool of potential organ donors and allows more people to be transplanted. That's the advantage of this whole thing, but it is a research project so we are going to monitor it very carefully," said Dr. David Klassen of the United Network for Organ Sharing, which oversees the nation's transplant system. Hopkins is the first hospital given permission for HIV-to-HIV transplant research. Two others - Hahnemann University Hospital in Philadelphia and Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York - also are approved for studies, according to the UNOS. Segev helped spur a 2013 law - the HIV Organ Policy Equity, or HOPE, Act - that lifted a federal ban on any use of HIV-infected organs and paved the way for that research. UNOS says at least 1,376 people with HIV have undergone transplants using HIV-negative organs since 2005. Special expertise is required to coordinate both the anti-HIV medications and anti-rejection drugs those patients require, but large studies have shown that HIV patients fare well after transplant. Using an HIV-positive organ adds an extra concern: Transplant recipients are exposed to a second strain of the virus from the donor, explained Dr. Christine Durand, a Hopkins infectious disease specialist. Doctors have to consider what anti-AIDS medications the donor took to avoid introducing HIV drug resistance. Hopkins' first HIV-to-HIV transplants were possible thanks to a deceased donor. The New England Organ Bank, which arranged for that donation, issued a statement from the unidentified woman's family expressing gratitude that someone who fought HIV's stigma was able to donate and help others. But Segev said his team also is exploring how to safely attempt kidney transplants using living donors who have HIV. And advocates said it's time for more people to ask about becoming organ donors. "If you have considered donation but think that no one would want your organs, let the doctors decide that," said Morris Murray, an HIV-positive Maryland man who waited years before receiving an HIV-negative liver transplant in 2013.


Reich D.J.,Hahnemann University
Current Opinion in Organ Transplantation | Year: 2013

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Healthcare reform and the national quality strategy is increasingly impacting transplant practice, as exemplified by quality assessment and performance improvement (QAPI) regulations for pretransplant and posttransplant care. Transplant providers consider not just patient comorbidities, donor quality, and business constraints, but also regulatory mandates when deciding how to care for transplant candidates and recipients. This review describes transplant quality oversight agencies and regulations, and explores recent literature on the pros and cons of transplant QAPI. RECENT FINDINGS: Transplant's heavily regulated system of care and remuneration involves extensive QAPI process and outcome requirements, and assessment of lifelong, risk-adjusted data from the national, audited, publicly reported, electronic registry. Transplant is a model-integrated delivery system, with payment bundling and accountability for equitable access to high quality, efficient, cost-sensitive, and multidisciplinary care. However, transplant QAPI requires expensive resources and, to bolster wise risk-taking, novel treatments, and access to care, more nuanced risk adjustment, public reporting, and attention to geographic competitive variability. However, transplant QAPI requires expensive resources. In order to bolster wise risk-taking, novel treatments, and access to care, QAPI also requires more nuance in the areas of risk adjustment, public reporting, and attention to geographic competitive variability. SUMMARY: With its focus on innovation and on clinical outcomes, transplantation is poised to continue providing outstanding clinical care and to pioneering systems that advance patient safety, satisfaction, and resource utilization, leading in the field of QAPI and healthcare reform. © 2013 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Chauhan V.,Hahnemann University
Postgraduate medicine | Year: 2012

Bone disease is common in recipients of kidney, heart, lung, liver, and bone marrow transplants, and causes debilitating complications, such as osteoporosis, osteonecrosis, bone pain, and fractures. The frequency of fractures ranges from 6% to 45% for kidney transplant recipients to 22% to 42% for heart, lung, and liver transplant recipients. Bone disease in transplant patients is the sum of complex mechanisms that involve both preexisting bone disease before transplant and post-transplant bone loss due to the effects of immunosuppressive medications. Evaluation of bone disease should preferably start before the transplant or in the early post-transplant period and include assessment of bone mineral density and other metabolic factors that influence bone health. This requires close coordination between the primary care physician and transplant team. Patients should be stratified based on their fracture risk. Prevention and treatment include risk factor reduction, antiresorptive medications, such as bisphosphonates and calcitonin, calcitriol, and/or gonadal hormone replacement. A steroid-avoidance protocol may be considered.


There has been an emergence of reduced port techniques for laparoscopic surgery over the past three years. Although growing in presentations and papers, few scientific studies have yet to be published demonstrating benefits and risks of these techniques. In particular, very little is mentioned regarding the increased costs. This brings to the forefront the concept that the development of new surgical techniques should adhere to safe standards of surgery and undergo continued evaluation during development to ensure they maintain safety, and are able to be reproduced by our colleagues. Evaluation also needs to focus on costs, both economical and ecological. A review of our first three years experience of single port access surgery has been done. Costs in terms of both the potential economic and environmental impact have also been evaluated as compared with multiport procedures. In the first 36 months of this evolving technique, we were able to mimic multiport procedures with similar results. The costs of single port access are less than comparable multiport procedures, both in terms of dollars as well as medical waste. We are able to now offer "proof of concept" of a novel reduced port procedure from four important aspects in the development of new surgical techniques. We demonstrate comparable results in terms of outcomes and safety, improvement in financial and environmental costs, as well as showing initial success with training and application of the procedure by our colleagues.


Kuczkowski K.M.,Hahnemann University
Current Opinion in Obstetrics and Gynecology | Year: 2011

Purpose of review: Peripartum hemorrhage still remains a significant source of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Abnormal placentation is one of the leading causes of peripartum hemorrhage. Recent findings: The incidence of abnormal placentation is increasing secondary to the increased incidence of cesarean section. The main forms of abnormal placentation include placenta accreta, placenta previa and low-lying placenta. Historically placenta accreta was an incidental finding at the time of delivery and was associated with high maternal morbidity and mortality. The development of new imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and transvaginal color Doppler sonography has allowed antenatal diagnosis of this condition and elective preoperative planning of the obstetric and anesthetic management of these patients. Optimum management for most cases requires elective cesarean hysterectomy, performed ideally at about 34 weeks' gestation. Summary: The present article is an update on the state-of-the art multidisciplinary management of parturients undergoing cesarean hysterectomy with special emphasis on anesthetic considerations. It summarizes the prevention, management and treatment of obstetric hemorrhages in parturients with abnormal placentation and highlights recent advances and developments. The obstetrician and the obstetric anesthesiologist must know, on the spot, how to deal with abnormal placentation-related peripartum bleeding. A multidisciplinary approach results in best outcomes. © 2011 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

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