Mumbai, India
Mumbai, India

Time filter

Source Type

Sawant M.G.,Haffkine Institute
Indian Journal of Pharmacology | Year: 2015

Aim: This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of Vigna mungo hydroalcoholic extract (VMHA) by papain induced osteoarthritis (OA) in the rat model. Materials and Methods: OA was induced by intra-articular injection of papain (4% w/v) along with cysteine (0.03 M) on day 1, 4 and 7 in rats and VMHA was administered orally in three doses (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) after last papain injection. The anti-osteoarthritic activity was evaluated by measuring knee joint diameter, grip strength, locomotion activity and hanging time. Histopathological analysis and acute toxicity study were also performed. Results: VMHA improved inflammatory condition with all the doses, but significant (P < 0.05) attenuation of inflammation was present only with 400 mg/kg dose. The grip strength, locomotion activity and hanging time were also significantly (P < 0.05) improved at dose level of 100 mg/kg however other two doses (200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg) were not found to be effective. VMHA did not show any mortality or any toxic clinical signs after oral administration of 2 g/kg dose. Conclusion: VMHA improved arthritic condition by significantly reducing pain and inflammation. © 2015, Medknow Publications. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Haffkine Institute
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Indian journal of pharmacology | Year: 2015

This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of Vigna mungo hydroalcoholic extract (VMHA) by papain induced osteoarthritis (OA) in the rat model.OA was induced by intra-articular injection of papain (4% w/v) along with cysteine (0.03 M) on day 1, 4 and 7 in rats and VMHA was administered orally in three doses (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) after last papain injection. The anti-osteoarthritic activity was evaluated by measuring knee joint diameter, grip strength, locomotion activity and hanging time. Histopathological analysis and acute toxicity study were also performed.VMHA improved inflammatory condition with all the doses, but significant (P < 0.05) attenuation of inflammation was present only with 400 mg/kg dose. The grip strength, locomotion activity and hanging time were also significantly (P < 0.05) improved at dose level of 100 mg/kg however other two doses (200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg) were not found to be effective. VMHA did not show any mortality or any toxic clinical signs after oral administration of 2 g/kg dose.VMHA improved arthritic condition by significantly reducing pain and inflammation.


Metri K.G.,Bangalore University | Bhargav H.,Bangalore University | Chowdhury P.,Bangalore University | Koka P.S.,Haffkine Institute | Koka P.S.,Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies
Journal of Stem Cells | Year: 2013

Chemotherapy drugs and radiotherapy are highly toxic and both damage adjacent healthy cells. Side effects may be acute (occurring within few weeks after therapy), intermediate or late (occurring months or years after the therapy). Some important side effects of chemotherapy are: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, mucositis, alopecia, constipation etc; whereas radiation therapy though administered locally, can produce systemic side effects such as fatigue, anorexia, nausea, vomiting, alteration in the taste, sleep disturbance, headache, anemia, dry skin, constipation etc. Late complications of these therapies also include pharyngitis, esophagitis, laryngitis, persistent dysphagia, fatigue, hepatotoxicity, infertility and cognitive deficits. These arrays of side effects have a devastating effect on the quality of life of cancer survivors. Due to the inadequacy of most of the radio-protectors and chemo-protectors in controlling the side effects of conventional cancer therapy the complementary and alternative medicines have attracted the view of researchers and medical practitioners more recently. This review aims at providing a comprehensive management protocol of above mentioned chemo-radiotherapy induced side effects based on Ayurveda, which is an ancient system of traditional medicine practiced in Indian peninsula since 5000 BC. When the major side effects of chemoradiotherapy are looked through an ayurvedic perspective, it appears that they are the manifestations of aggravated pitta dosha, especially under the group of disorders called Raktapitta (haemorrhage) or Raktadushti (vascular inflammation). Based on comprehensive review of ancient vedic literature and modern scientific evidences, ayurveda based interventions are put forth. This manuscript should help clinicians and people suffering from cancer to combat serious chemo-radiotherapy related side effects through simple but effective home-based ayurveda remedies. The remedies described are commonly available and safe. These simple ayurveda based solutions may act as an important adjuvant to chemo-radiotherapy and enhance the quality of life of cancer patients. © Nova Science Publishers, Inc.


Das M.,Haffkine Institute | Das M.,Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies | Sundell I.B.,Haffkine Institute | Sundell I.B.,Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Stem Cells | Year: 2013

Recent advances in the field of regenerative medicines manifested the unique properties of stem cells including the ability of self-renewal and differentiation to make them available for their replacement in tissue injury. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are important tools in treating immune disorders and in tissue repair due to their multipotency, immunosuppressive properties, and production of cytokines or growth factors. MSC-mediated therapy is a fast-growing field that has proven safe and effective in the treatment of various degenerative diseases and tissue injuries. Generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells holds a great promise for regenerative medicine and other aspects of clinical applications. The mechanisms governing multipotency in MSCs are not well understood. This review mainly throws light on the biology of MSCs, including their efficiency in treating several diseases and also the progress of the use of iPSC-derived MSC widely in the clinic. © Nova Science Publishers, Inc.


Ramdass B.,Poornaprajna Institute of Scientific Research | Chowdhary A.,Haffkine Institute | Koka P.S.,Poornaprajna Institute of Scientific Research | Koka P.S.,Haffkine Institute
Journal of Stem Cells | Year: 2013

Evidence suggests that there is a link between high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) and cervical cancer. Studies indicate that persistence of high risk HPVs may determine progression to more severe stages of cervical disease, while the majority of HPV infections are transient and do not seem to be important in cervical carcinogenesis. Earlier studies in different cancers have shown that tumor initiating cells TICs are responsible for tumor formation and progression and interestingly, they are endowed with stem/ progenitor cell properties. In particular, TICs share with stem cells the key feature of self-renewal. The most efficacious therapeutic intervention for cervical cancer is probably vaccination. This review gives an overview on cervical cancer and its potential therapeutic interventions. © Nova Science Publishers, Inc.


Mehta S.,Haffkine Institute | Mukherjee S.,Haffkine Institute | Balasubramanian D.,Haffkine Institute | Chowdhary A.,Haffkine Institute
NeuroImmunoModulation | Year: 2014

Objective: Recombinant human interferon (rhIFN)-α is a potent immunoregulator having a wide range of therapeutic applications. In the present study, rhIFN-α was evaluated for its neuroimmunomodulatory activity. Method: Dose-dependent gene expression of cytokines and chemokines in the brain of rhIFN-administered mice was studied using real-time SYBR green PCR. Results: Statistically significant increase in expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β and IFN-γ were observed. Conclusion: The findings indicate that rhIFN-α may be used at an optimized dose to cause appropriate neuromodulation of cytokine/chemokine secretion that can aid in the development of therapeutic approaches for many infectious diseases of the central nervous system for which therapies are lacking. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.


Patil D.,Haffkine Institute | Dahake R.,Haffkine Institute | Roy S.,Haffkine Institute | Mukherjee S.,Haffkine Institute | And 2 more authors.
Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology | Year: 2014

A total of 100 blood and 18 urine samples of rodents and suspected dogs were collected from Mumbai, India during 2006-2008. In order to determine the role of animals in transmission of the disease to humans, all the samples were screened retrospectively by real-time polymerase chain reaction for leptospiral DNA and antibodies were detected using microscopic agglutination test. Leptopsiral DNA was detected from two blood and five urine samples from rodents. Of a total of 71 rodent and dog samples investigated for anti-Leptospira antibodies, 14 (19.7%) were positive. Pyrogenes was the predominant serovar found in 100.0% (7/7) and 85.7% (6/7) from suspected canine cases and rodents, respectively; followed by Icterohemorrhagiae, which was found in one rodent sample 14.28% (1/7). The study proves that there is high prevalence of leptospirosis in rodents and dogs in this region, which proves possible role of these animals in transmission of leptospires to humans. Hence it is imperative to necessary control measures to prevent human leptospirosis.


Ramdass B.,Haffkine Institute | Koka P.S.,Haffkine Institute
Current Stem Cell Research and Therapy | Year: 2015

One of Nature’s gifts to mankind is mesenchymal stem cells (MSC’s). They are multipotent in nature and are present literally in every tissue. Since, they possess certain characteristics of stem cells such as self-renewal and differentiation they are known to be one of the key players in normal tissue homeostasis. This novel function of mesenchymal stem cells has been explored by scientists in the field of regenerative medicine. This review gives an insight of the various sources of mesenchymal stem cells available for tissue engineering with regard to tendon and ligament and the mechanism involved during regeneration. © 2015 Bentham Science Publishers.


Patil D.,Haffkine Institute | Roy S.,Haffkine Institute | Dahake R.,Haffkine Institute | Rajopadhye S.,Haffkine Institute | And 3 more authors.
Indian Journal of Virology | Year: 2013

Influenza is a serious respiratory illness which can be debilitating and cause complications that lead to hospitalization and death. Although influenza vaccine can prevent influenza virus infection, the only therapeutic options to treat influenza virus infection are antiviral agents. Given temporal and geographic changes and the shifts in antiviral drug resistance among influenza viruses, it is time to consider natural antiviral agents against influenza virus. Jatropha curcas is known for various medicinal uses. Its antimicrobial, anti-cancer and anti-HIV activity has been well recognized. Because of its broad-spectrum activity, we investigated aqueous and methanol leaf extracts for cytotoxicity and its potential to inhibit hemagglutinin protein of influenza virus. The bioactive compounds from leaf extracts were characterized by high-performance thinlayer chromatography which revealed the presence of major phytochemicals including flavonoids, saponins and tannins. The cytotoxic concentration 50 for aqueous and methanol extracts were determined using trypan blue dye exclusion assay. Inhibition of hemagglutinin protein was assessed using minimal cytotoxic concentrations of the extracts and 102.5 TCID50 (64 HA titre) of the Influenza A (H1N1) virus with different exposure studies using hemagglutination assay. Aqueous and methanol extracts were found to be non toxic to Madin darby canine kidney cells below concentration of 15.57 and 33.62 mg/mL for respectively. Inhibition of hemagglutinin was studied using reducing hemagglutination titre which confirmed that the J. curcas extracts have direct effect on the process of virus adsorption leading to its inhibition. Our results provide the information which shows the potential of Jatropha extracts in the treatment of influenza A (H1N1) virus infection. With an established reduced toxicity and prevention of infection by inhibiting hemagglutinin protein, these extracts and its derivatives may be further developed as broad spectrum anti-influenza drugs for prevention and treatment of infections by different types of influenza viruses with further mechanistic studies on anti-influenza. © 2013 Indian Virological Society.


PubMed | Haffkine Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Virusdisease | Year: 2015

The present study was carried out to monitor influenza viruses by identifying the virus and studying the seasonal variation during 2007-2009 in Mumbai. A total of 193 clinical respiratory samples (nasal and throat swab) were collected from patients having influenza like illness in Mumbai region. One-step real-time reverse-transcriptase PCR (rRTPCR) was used to detect Influenza type A (H1 and H3) and Influenza type B virus. Isolation of the virus was carried out using in vitro system which was further confirmed and typed by hemagglutination assay and hemagglutination inhibition assay. Out of 193 samples 24 (12.4 3%) samples tested positive for influenza virus, of which 13 (6.73 %) were influenza type A virus and 10 (5.18 %) were influenza type B virus, while 1 sample (0.51 %) was positive for both. By culture methods, 3 (1.55 %) viral isolates were obtained. All the three isolates were found to be Influenza type B/Malaysia (Victoria lineage) by Hemagglutination Inhibition Assay. The data generated from the present study reveals that both Influenza type A and B are prevalent in Mumbai with considerable activity. The peak activity was observed during monsoon season.

Loading Haffkine Institute collaborators
Loading Haffkine Institute collaborators