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Corazzelli G.,Haematology Oncology and Stem Cell Transplantation Unit | Angrilli F.,Santo Spirito Hospital | D'Arco A.,Umberto I Hospital | Ferrara F.,Cardarelli Hospital | And 13 more authors.
British Journal of Haematology | Year: 2013

The management of patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) recurring after stem cell transplantation (SCT) and multiply relapsed disease remains challenging. We report on 41 such patients who received bendamustine hydrochloride, a bifunctional mechlorethamine derivative mechanistically unrelated to traditional alkylators, after a median of four prior chemotherapy lines, including SCT in 85% of cases. Bendamustine was given at doses of 90-120 mg/m2 every 21 or 28 d. At first assessment (2-4 cycles), the overall response rate (ORR) was 78% with 12 (29%) complete (CR) and 20 (49%) partial responses (PR). Upon treatment prolongation to 6-8 courses, 40% of PRs progressed, yielding a final ORR of 58% with 31% of CRs. Eight patients (two CRs, six PRs) were subsequently allotransplanted. Median progression-free and overall survival exceeded 11 and 21 months respectively; complete responders displayed a median disease-free survival above 9 months with a relapse rate of only 30%. Outcomes were independent of disease chemosensitivity, previous transplant and bendamustine dose-intensity. No life-threatening or unexpected adverse events occurred. Within the limits of a retrospective analysis and schedule heterogeneity, these results appear very encouraging and prompt prospective trials to confirm bendamustine as a valuable option in the palliative setting and in cytoreductive strategies before allotransplantation. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.


Corazzelli G.,Haematology Oncology and Stem Cell Transplantation Unit | Frigeri F.,Haematology Oncology and Stem Cell Transplantation Unit | Russo F.,Haematology Oncology and Stem Cell Transplantation Unit | Frairia C.,Haematology | And 13 more authors.
British Journal of Haematology | Year: 2012

Specific trials on adult Burkitt lymphoma (BL) and 'unclassifiable' lymphomas with features intermediate between BL and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (BL/DLBCL) are advocated which include substantial numbers of older patients, to improve treatment feasibility, while countering risks of systemic and central nervous system (CNS) recurrences. We prospectively evaluated a modified CODOX-M/IVAC (CODOX-M: cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, high-dose methotrexate; IVAC: ifosfamide, etoposide and high-dose cytarabine) regimen by the addition of rituximab (R) and liposome-encapsulated cytarabine (D) to increase antitumour activity and halve the number of intrathecal treatments. Thirty adults (40% >60years) with BL (n=15) and BL/DLBCL (n=15) were accrued. Primary endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS), CNS recurrence, and liposomal cytarabine-associated toxicity. Eighty percent of patients received the whole treatment programme, the remaining cases received at least three full courses. Application of the RD-CODOX-M/IVAC regimen resulted in remarkable 4-year PFS (78%) and complete remission (CR) rates (93%). However, PFS was significantly lower in patients older than 60years as compared to younger ones (49%vs 93%, P=0·03; median, 36months), despite high actual dose-intensity, CR rate and tolerability. Reduced-intensity intratechal prophylaxis through liposomal cytarabine was effective because the CNS failure rate was low (3·4%) and without severe neurological toxicities. The RD-CODOX-M/IVAC strategy is feasible and highly effective, but improving outcomes in elderly patients remains a priority. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.


PubMed | Haematology Oncology and Stem Cell Transplantation Unit
Type: Clinical Trial, Phase II | Journal: British journal of haematology | Year: 2011

Specific trials on adult Burkitt lymphoma (BL) and unclassifiable lymphomas with features intermediate between BL and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (BL/DLBCL) are advocated which include substantial numbers of older patients, to improve treatment feasibility, while countering risks of systemic and central nervous system (CNS) recurrences. We prospectively evaluated a modified CODOX-M/IVAC (CODOX-M: cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, high-dose methotrexate; IVAC: ifosfamide, etoposide and high-dose cytarabine) regimen by the addition of rituximab (R) and liposome-encapsulated cytarabine (D) to increase antitumour activity and halve the number of intrathecal treatments. Thirty adults (40% >60years) with BL (n=15) and BL/DLBCL (n=15) were accrued. Primary endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS), CNS recurrence, and liposomal cytarabine-associated toxicity. Eighty percent of patients received the whole treatment programme, the remaining cases received at least three full courses. Application of the RD-CODOX-M/IVAC regimen resulted in remarkable 4-year PFS (78%) and complete remission (CR) rates (93%). However, PFS was significantly lower in patients older than 60years as compared to younger ones (49%vs 93%, P=003; median, 36months), despite high actual dose-intensity, CR rate and tolerability. Reduced-intensity intratechal prophylaxis through liposomal cytarabine was effective because the CNS failure rate was low (34%) and without severe neurological toxicities. The RD-CODOX-M/IVAC strategy is feasible and highly effective, but improving outcomes in elderly patients remains a priority.

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