Hospital Habib Bourguiba

Sfax, Tunisia

Hospital Habib Bourguiba

Sfax, Tunisia
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Hammouda O.,Research Laboratory Sport Performance Optimization | Hammouda O.,University of Sfax | Chtourou H.,Research Laboratory Sport Performance Optimization | Chahed H.,Biochemistry Laboratory | And 6 more authors.
Chronobiology International | Year: 2011

The aim of this study was (i) to evaluate whether homocysteine (Hcy), total antioxidant status (TAS), and biological markers of muscle injury would be affected by time of day (TOD) in football players and (ii) to establish a relationship between diurnal variation of these biomarkers and the daytime rhythm of power and muscle fatigue during repeated sprint ability (RSA) exercise. In counterbalanced order, 12 football (soccer) players performed an RSA test (5×[6 s of maximal cycling sprint+24 s of rest]) on two different occasions: 07:0008:30h and 17:0018:30h. Fasting blood samples were collected from a forearm vein before and 35min after each RSA test. Core temperature, rating of perceived exertion, and performances (i.e., Sprint 1, Sprint 2, and power decrease) during the RSA test were significantly higher at 17:00 than 07:00h (p<.001, p<.05, and p<.05, respectively). The results also showed significant diurnal variation of resting Hcy levels and all biological markers of muscle injury with acrophases (peak times) observed at 17:00h. These fluctuations persisted after the RSA test. However, biomarkers of antioxidant status' resting levels (i.e., total antioxidant status, uric acid, and total bilirubin) were higher in the morning. This TOD effect was suppressed after exercise for TAS and uric acid. In conclusion, the present study confirms diurnal variation of Hcy, selected biological markers of cellular damage, and antioxidant status in young football players. Also, the higher performances and muscle fatigue showed in the evening during RSA exercise might be due to higher levels of biological markers of muscle injury and lower antioxidant status at this TOD. © Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.


PubMed | Hospital of Hedi Chaker and Hospital Habib Bourguiba
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Clinics and practice | Year: 2014

The incidence of myositis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is low among different series. Here we attempt to describe the main features of SLE/myositis overlap syndrome. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 174 patients with SLE seen over 15-year period. All the patients fulfilled the revised American Rheumatology Association criteria for SLE. Patients who met The Bohan and Peter criteria for definite myositis were included in this study. Among those patients, six patients had an associated myositis (3.4% overall). They were 6 women with a mean age of 29 years (20-41 years). At the initial evaluation, 3 patients (50%) were complained from myalgia, and all patients had symmetrical muscle weakness (proximal muscle weakness in 6 cases with distal muscle weakness in 2 cases). The muscle disease was severe in 1 case. Involvements of muscles of the pharynx and upper esophagus were noted in 4 patients (66.6%). The creatine kinase (CK) levels were elevated in 4 cases with a mean rate of 2153.5 UI/L. The electromyogram (EMG) revealed signs of myositis in 5 cases. Muscle biopsy, performed in 5 patients, revealed an inflammatory myopathy changes in 4 cases. Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) were positive in all cases. All our patients were treated with high doses of corticosteroids with favorable outcome. Relapse of SLE disease had occurred in 2 patients. The association SLE-myositis is rare with heterogeneous presentation. Through our observations and literature data we will specify the characteristics of this association.

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