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Augusta, GA, United States

Ferris D.,Gynecologic Cancer Prevention Center | Horn L.,Georgia Regents University
Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine | Year: 2010

Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine factors that influence parent's acceptance of a mandatory school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program. Methods: A convenience sample of 325 parents, with children aged 9 to 17 years old, completed a 53-item survey. Survey questions targeted their opinions about HPV, the HPV vaccine, and a mandatory HPV vaccination program. χ2 tests were used to examine relationships between survey items. Results: Characteristics of parents who believed the HPV vaccine should be mandated included limited financial resources (P = .03), history of HPV-related disease (P = .04), understanding their child's susceptibility (P = .03), interest in HPV vaccination for their child (P = .0001), and knowledge that the vaccine reduces the risk of cervical cancer (P = .001). Parents of children aged 12 to 14 years old (P = .02) or who knew the vaccine reduced their child's risk of developing genital warts (P = .02) and cervical cancer (P = .001) would be more likely to comply with a mandatory HPV vaccine program. Conclusions: Certain characteristics define parents who support a mandatory HPV vaccination program. Greater education of parents and health care providers should improve vaccination uptake, which ultimately reduces morbidity and mortality from HPV related diseases. Source


Ferris D.,Gynecologic Cancer Prevention Center | Ferris D.,University of Georgia | Lambert R.,Gynecologic Cancer Prevention Center | Dickens P.,University of Georgia | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease | Year: 2013

OBJECTIVE: The objectives of this study were to determine women's knowledge of human papillomavirus (HPV) and anal cancer and knowledge and attitudes toward the anal Pap test. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A convenience sample of 370 women from the general population 21 years or older completed a 48-question preintervention survey; read an informational pamphlet about anal cancer, HPV, and anal Pap tests; and then completed a 21-question postintervention survey in Augusta, Atlanta, and Savannah, GA. The survey assessed their knowledge about anal cancer, HPV, and the anal Pap test and determined their attitudes toward the anal Pap test. Only preintervention results were considered in this article. Descriptive statistics were determined for all variables. RESULTS: Only 17.6% of women had previously heard of anal Pap tests, and the majority knew nothing (48.9%) or only a little (38.5%) about anal cancer. Yet, most women (78.6%) knew that anal Pap tests help to prevent anal cancer, and 86.2% knew that anal Pap tests are not only for people who have anal sex. Only a minority of women recognized known risk factors for anal cancer. Lack of knowledge about anal Pap tests (43.8%), pain or discomfort (41.3%), cost (24.0%), and embarrassment (21.2%) were the main reasons cited for not wanting an anal Pap test. CONCLUSIONS: Although most women had limited knowledge about anal cancer and anal Pap tests and few recognized known risk factors for anal cancer, women were receptive to screening. Further implementation of anal Pap testing for women may be improved by understanding women's limited knowledge and concerns. © 2013, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology. Source


Horn L.,Georgia Regents University | Howard C.,Georgia Regents University | Waller J.,Gynecologic Cancer Prevention Center | Ferris D.G.,Gynecologic Cancer Prevention Center
Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease | Year: 2010

OBJECTIVE. To determine parents' opinions about school-entry mandates for the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. MATERIALS AND METHODS.: During the summer of 2008, 325 parents, with children 9 to 17 years old, completed a 53-question survey that evaluated their opinions about vaccines, HPV and the HPV vaccine, and mandatory childhood vaccination programs. Descriptive statistics were calculated for all survey items. RESULTS. Although 89% of parents supported mandatory vaccination programs in general, only 43% thought that the HPV vaccine should be included. The main reasons for nonsupport included that it would infringe on their rights (57%), that the vaccine had not been well studied (33%), and that it had too many adverse effects (29%). Of all parents, 13% said their children had already received the HPV vaccine and 81% wanted their children to receive it. CONCLUSIONS. At this point, although most parents want their children to receive the HPV vaccine, most do not support it being mandated. The provision of more safety data to parents should help improve overall HPV vaccination rates. © 2009 American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology. Source

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