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Jung H.-R.,Gyeonggi do Institute of Health and Environment | Lee M.-J.,Gyeonggi do Institute of Health and Environment | Kim K.-C.,Gyeonggi do Institute of Health and Environment | Kim J.-B.,Gyeonggi do Institute of Health and Environment | And 6 more authors.
Journal of the Korean Society of Food Science and Nutrition | Year: 2010

The prevalence rate for chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, hypertension etc. caused by the increment of national income and the change of food life according to the globalization in Korea have been increased. Especially excess sodium intake may contribute to the development of hypertension, increasing cardiovascular disease risk. The objective of this study was to investigate sodium intake of nursery school meals in Gyeonggi-Do, and to construct database for lesser sodium intake policy. Survey consisted of 601 sample intakes of sodium in summer and in winter. A food weighed record method was used for measuring food intakes. Average intakes of ten children per nursery school were measured. The sodium contents of meals were analyzed by ICP-OES (inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer) after acid digestion by microwave. The sodium contents on food groups showed that sources (693 mg/100 g), grilled foods (689 mg/100 g) and kimchies (643 mg/100 g) had respectively higher sodium contents and the average sodium intake per meal was 582±204 mg. The sodium contents of soups & hot soups and kimchies had 37.5% and 15.8% of total sodium intakes per meal, respectively. Sodium intakes per meal in summer and winter showed 572.3 mg and 592.3 mg, respectively. Regional ranking of sodium intakes showed the ascending order of apartment (514.3 mg/meal), rural region (540.5 mg/meal), multiplex house (635.9 mg/meal) and industrial complex (696.4 mg/ meal). A habit of excessive sodium intakes in childhood will threaten their health when they grow up to be adults; thus lesser intake of sodium per meal is needed for children in nursery school. Source


Jung H.R.,Health Research Planning Team | Park Y.-B.,Health Research Planning Team | Lee M.-J.,Health Research Planning Team | Kim K.-C.,Health Research Planning Team | And 7 more authors.
Korean Journal of Food Science and Technology | Year: 2011

Excess sugar intake by food consumption may contribute to the development of diabetes, dental caries, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and cardiovascular disease. The objective of this study was to investigate the sugar intake from meals at nursery schools in Gyeonggi-Do, and to construct a database for reduction policies sugar intake. A total of 601 samples were analyzed for sugar intake in summer and winter, respectively. The average sugar intake from food service was 2.22 g/meal, which was 5% of the Recommended Daily Intake (RDI). Furthermore, the analysis results of sugar content were in the decreasing order of fruits (5.05 g/100 g), fried food (2.92 g/100 g), and braised food (2.31 g/ 100 g). The habit of excessive sugar intake in childhood can be threaten health in adulthood. Thus, it is necessary for nursery school children to consume schoolmeals that contain less sugar. © The Korean Society of Food Science and Technology. Source


Lee J.,South Korea National institute of Food and Drug Safety Evaluation | Kang Y.,South Korea National institute of Food and Drug Safety Evaluation | Jeong J.,Gyeongin Regional KFDA | Noh M.,Gyeongin Regional KFDA | And 3 more authors.
Korean Journal of Food Science and Technology | Year: 2012

This research was conducted to monitor ochratoxin A in wine, beer, makgeolli and fermented alcoholic beverages to estimate the exposure to ochratoxin A in the assorted alcoholic beverages. The analytical method for ochratoxin A was based on immuno-affinity column clean up followed by HPLC-FLD. Ochratoxin A was detected in 30 samples of 177 wine (17%), 25 samples of 106 beer (23.6%), 11 samples of 74 makgeolli (14.9%), and 7 samples of 74 fermented alcoholic beverages (9.5%). The average levels of ochratoxin A were 0.039 ng/mL in wine, 0.010 ng/mL in beer, 0.023 ng/mL in makgeolli , and 0.014 ng/mL in fermented alcoholic beverages. The daily dietary exposure level of ochratoxin A estimated by using the report on national health and nutrition survey were 0.039 ng/b.w.day from wine, 0.010 ng/b.w.day from beer, 0.023 ng/b.w.day from makgeolli , and 0.014 ng/b.w.day from fermented alcoholic beverage. © The Korean Society of Food Science and Technology. Source


Kang Y.W.,NIFDS | Joo H.J.,Gyeongin Regional KFDA | Kim Y.S.,Gyeongin Regional KFDA | Cho Y.J.,Gyeongin Regional KFDA | And 3 more authors.
Korean Journal of Food Science and Technology | Year: 2011

It is possible that veterinary medicines remain in livestock food products, according to the use of many and various veterinary medicines to protect against disease when livestock animals are breed in limited space. Concentrated and continuous monitoring of residues is needed due to increases in resistance to antibiotics and side effects by eating livestock food products. We developed an analysis method for detecting streptomycin, dihydrostreptomycin, neomycin, gentamicin and spectinomycin in meat using LC/MS/MS and measured sensitivity, precision, accuracy, linearity and recovery according to CODEX guidelines to acquire confidence in the analysis method. Based on the results, we acquired good sensitivity compared to the maximum residue limit (MRL) as limits of detection (LOD) were 0.002-0.016 mg/kg and limits of quantification (LOQ) were 0.006-0.050 mg/kg. The analysis method satisfied the CODEX guidelines. The linearity (r2) values of aminoglycoside antibiotics were 0.9936-0.9980, recoveries were 60-110% and relative standard deviations (RSD) were within 15%. As a result of monitoring for residues in a total 250 samples of livestock foods such as pork, chicken, and beef by the confirmed method, dihydrostreptomycin and gentamicin were detected in 5 pork samples. The residues of these antibiotics were within the MRLs. Thus, the detection ratio was 2% as 5 samples were identified from 250 samples. © The Korean Society of Food Science and Technology. Source

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