Gyeongbuk Institute for Marine Bio Industry GIMB

South Korea

Gyeongbuk Institute for Marine Bio Industry GIMB

South Korea
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Moon J.-G.,Chungbuk National University | Jung M.-Y.,Chungbuk National University | Kim J.-G.,Chungbuk National University | Park S.-J.,Chungbuk National University | And 3 more authors.
Korean Journal of Microbiology | Year: 2013

Cave environment provides special ecosystems for evolution of lives distant from surface environments. We investigated bacterial and archaeal communities of wall biofilm obtained from of a volcanic cave (Daesubee) in Jeju, Republic of Korea. Bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes were PCR-amplified and sequenced using pyrosequencing technologies. Unique prokaryotic communities with low diversities were observed. The main bacterial sequences (ca. 83% of total reads) were affiliated with Pseudonocardia mongoliensis of phylum Actinobacteria and clustered with clones obtained from various caves. Reflection of light on the wall surface of cave might be caused by formation of beads of water caused by hydrophobic filaments of actinobacterial colonies. Main archaeal sequences (ca. 65.7% of total reads) were related with those of I.1a-Associated group of phylum Thaumarchaeota. The sequences were related with that of Candidatus Nitrosotalea devanaterra which was known to oxidize ammonia under acidic condition (ca. pH 5.0). Nutrients leached through volcanic soils contribute formation of unique microbial communities of wall biofilm of cave Daesubee. © 2013, The Microbiological Society of Korea.


Kim J.-S.,Gyeongbuk Institute for Marine Bio Industry GIMB | Woo J.-H.,Gyeongbuk Institute for Marine Bio Industry GIMB | Kim J.-T.,Gyeongbuk Institute for Marine Bio Industry GIMB | Park N.-H.,Gyeongbuk Institute for Marine Bio Industry GIMB | Kim C.-G.,Gyeongbuk Institute for Marine Bio Industry GIMB
Korean Journal of Microbiology | Year: 2010

New technologies are providing unprecedented knowledge into microbial community structure and functions. Even though nucleic acid based approaches provide a lot of information, metaproteomics could provide a high-resolution representation of genotypic and phenotypic traits of distinct microbial communities. Analyzing the metagenome from different microbial ecosystems, metaproteomics has been applied to seawater, human guts, activated sludge, acid mine drainage biofilm, and soil. Although these studies employed different approaches, they elucidated that metaproteomics could provide a link among microbial community structure, function, physiology, interaction, ecology, and evolution. These approaches are reviewed here to help gain insights into the function of microbial community in ecosystems. © 2010, The Microbiological Society of Korea.


Kwon T.-H.,Gyeongbuk Institute for Marine Bio Industry GIMB | Kim J.-T.,Gyeongbuk Institute for Marine Bio Industry GIMB | Kim J.-S.,Gyeongbuk Institute for Marine Bio Industry GIMB
Korean Journal of Microbiology | Year: 2010

Recent studies have described various microorganisms that can degrade PAH, however, there are currently limited methods available to screen for PAH-degrading microorganisms. To screen for PAH-degrading microorganisms, a sublimation method (Alley, Jeremy F. and Lewis R. Brown. 2000. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 66, 439-442) was modified to produce a simple screening system. In our results, there were several bacterial species capable of pyrene degradation including genera, Coryenbacterium, Gordonia, Rhodococcus, and Streptomyces, which have been screened from 350 bacterial isolates of commercial gasoline and oil-spilled sediment by the sublimation method. The main advantage of this method is that it (i) safely deposits an even, thin and visible layer of PAH onto the agar surface without the use of solvents and (ii) the quantity of PAH sublimed onto the agar can be easily controlled. Overall, this sublimation method may be an effective and simple technique to screen for PAH-degrading microorganisms. © 2010, The Microbiological Society of Korea.


Woo J.-H.,Gyeongbuk Institute for Marine Bio Industry GIMB | Lee E.Y.,Kyung Hee University
Biotechnology Letters | Year: 2014

(S)-Styrene oxide, (S)-2-chlorostyrene oxide (CSO), (S)-3-CSO and (S)-4-CSO with 99.9 %ee were obtained with a yield of 20.6, 39.3, 28.7 and 26.8 % from 4 mM corresponding racemic substrates using 10 mg cells of a newly-isolated Sphingopyxis sp. at pH 8.0 and 25 °C in 1 ml 100 mM Tris/HCl buffer after 420, 100, 120 and 55 min, respectively. For racemic 2CSO, well-known for one of the racemates that is difficult to obtained in enantiomerically pure form, (S)-2-CSO with 99.9 %ee, 39.3 % yield (theoretical yield 50 %) and enantiomeric ratio of 42.1 was obtained. The newly-isolated strain can thus be used as whole-cell biocatalyst in the production of various (S)-CSO with a chlorine group at different positions. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.


Woo J.-H.,Gyeongbuk Institute for Marine Bio Industry GIMB | Kang K.-M.,Gyeongbuk Institute for Marine Bio Industry GIMB | Kwon T.-H.,Gyeongbuk Institute for Marine Bio Industry GIMB | Park N.-H.,Gyeongbuk Institute for Marine Bio Industry GIMB | Lee E.Y.,Kyung Hee University
Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry | Year: 2015

Marine bacteria possessing epoxide hydrolase (EH) activity were isolated from the oil-spilled foreshore of South Korea. While the isolated Rhodococcus sp. YSMI04 and YSNA32 showed different enantioselectivities to racemic styrene oxide (SO), two strains exhibited same enantiopreference to 3-chlorostyrene oxide (3-CSO) and 4-CSO. In the case of 3-CSO, Rhodococcus sp. YSMI04 and YSNA32 exhibited (. R)-3-CSO preferred hydrolysis activity, whereas Roseobacter sp. TSBP12 showed a preference for (. S)-3-CSO. In the case of 4-CSO, Rhodococcus sp. YSMI04 and YSNA32 showed enantiopreference to (. S)-4-CSO, Roseobacter sp. TSBP12 exhibited (. R)-4-CSO preferred activity. (. S)-4-CSO was obtained with 35% yield (theoretically 50%) using Roseobacter sp. TSBP12. © 2015 The Korean Society of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry.


Woo J.-H.,Gyeongbuk Institute for Marine Bio Industry GIMB | Kwon T.-H.,Gyeongbuk Institute for Marine Bio Industry GIMB | Kim J.-T.,Gyeongbuk Institute for Marine Bio Industry GIMB | Kim C.-G.,Gyeongbuk Institute for Marine Bio Industry GIMB | Lee E.Y.,Kyung Hee University
Biotechnology Letters | Year: 2013

A novel epoxide hydrolase (EHase) from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria was identified and characterized. EHase activity was identified in four strains of PAH-degrading bacteria isolated from commercial gasoline and oil-contaminated sediment based on their growth on styrene oxide and its derivatives, such as 2,3- and 4-chlorostyrene oxides, as a sole carbon source. Gordonia sp. H37 exhibited high enantioselective hydrolysis activity for 4-chlorostyrene oxide with an enantiomeric ratio of 27. Gordonia sp. H37 preferentially hydrolyzed the (R)-enantiomer of styrene oxide derivatives resulting in the preparation of a (S)-enantiomer with enantiomeric excess greater than 99. 9 %. The enantioselective EHase activity was identified and characterized in various PAH-degrading bacteria, and whole cell Gordonia sp. H37 was employed as a biocatalyst for preparing enantiopure (S)-styrene oxide derivatives. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.


PubMed | Gyeongbuk Institute for Marine Bio Industry GIMB
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Biotechnology letters | Year: 2014

(S)-Styrene oxide, (S)-2-chlorostyrene oxide (CSO), (S)-3-CSO and (S)-4-CSO with 99.9%ee were obtained with a yield of 20.6, 39.3, 28.7 and 26.8% from 4mM corresponding racemic substrates using 10mg cells of a newly-isolated Sphingopyxis sp. at pH 8.0 and 25C in 1ml 100mM Tris/HCl buffer after 420, 100, 120 and 55min, respectively. For racemic 2CSO, well-known for one of the racemates that is difficult to obtained in enantiomerically pure form, (S)-2-CSO with 99.9%ee, 39.3% yield (theoretical yield 50%) and enantiomeric ratio of 42.1 was obtained. The newly-isolated strain can thus be used as whole-cell biocatalyst in the production of various (S)-CSO with a chlorine group at different positions.


A novel epoxide hydrolase (EHase) from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria was identified and characterized. EHase activity was identified in four strains of PAH-degrading bacteria isolated from commercial gasoline and oil-contaminated sediment based on their growth on styrene oxide and its derivatives, such as 2,3- and 4-chlorostyrene oxides, as a sole carbon source. Gordonia sp. H37 exhibited high enantioselective hydrolysis activity for 4-chlorostyrene oxide with an enantiomeric ratio of 27. Gordonia sp. H37 preferentially hydrolyzed the (R)-enantiomer of styrene oxide derivatives resulting in the preparation of a (S)-enantiomer with enantiomeric excess greater than 99.9 %. The enantioselective EHase activity was identified and characterized in various PAH-degrading bacteria, and whole cell Gordonia sp. H37 was employed as a biocatalyst for preparing enantiopure (S)-styrene oxide derivatives.

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