Guru Nanak Institute for Research and Development

Mumbai, India

Guru Nanak Institute for Research and Development

Mumbai, India
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Pednekar P.P.,Guru Nanak Institute for Research and Development | Vakil B.V.,Guru Nanak Institute for Research and Development | Sane R.T.,Guru Nanak Institute for Research and Development | Datar A.G.,Guru Nanak Institute for Research and Development
International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences | Year: 2013

Objective: The present study was designed to evaluate the phytochemical composition and antioxidant activity of essential oil from Blumea eriantha DC collected from Seawoods, Navi Mumbai (Maharashtra, India). Methods: The essential oil was extracted by hydrodistillation using Clevenger type apparatus and subjected to GC-FID, GC-MS and HPTLC analysis. Furthermore antioxidant activity of essential oil was investigated by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay. Results: Total 72 compounds were identified representing 96.83% of the oil. The main components of the essential oil are Ocim-(4E,6Z)-ene (13.72%), Caryophyllene <(E)-> (9.71%), Caryophyllene oxide (5.76%), Carvotanacetone (5.36%), Pinene (3.90%), Eudesmol <7-epi-alpha-> (3.74%). HPTLC fingerprint of essential oil was also developed in order to carry out easy and fast identification of essential oil constituents. The oil showed activity as a radical scavenger at 437.92 ± 4.22 μg/ml. Conclusion: The present study describes the phytochemical profile and antioxidant activity of essential oil from Blumea eriantha DC. These findings will be helpful in further application of this plant in cosmetics as well as traditional medicines.


Mammen D.,M. S. University of Baroda | Daniel M.,M. S. University of Baroda | Sane R.T.,Guru Nanak Institute for Research and Development
International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research | Year: 2010

Leptadenia reticulata, often referred to as Jivanti, has been mentioned to have high therapeutic value in Ayurvedic texts. It has been used in several Ayurvedic preparations as well as a number of formulations such as Leptaden and Speman. The plant being a vital component in these formulations, its quality and consistency is of prime importance. The present study deals with the study of the presence of any major variation in the plant due to change in season or region. Simultaneous comparison of the fingerprints of the plant has been done using HPTLC technique. The aqueous extracts which is known to be most effective have been compared for the plant collected during three different seasons, as well as from three different regions. The technique is simple and cost effective since a number of samples can be screened at once on a single TLC plate. P-coumaric acid was used as reference standard with which the HPTLC chromatograms obtained for each sample were compared. P-coumaric acid present in each sample was quantified using a calibration graph of the reference standard. The relative standard deviation, limit of detection and limit of quantification were also calculated.


Pednekar P.P.,Guru Nanak Institute for Research and Development | Vakil B.V.,Guru Nanak Institute for Research and Development | Sane R.T.,Guru Nanak Institute for Research and Development | Datar A.G.,Guru Nanak Institute for Research and Development
International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences | Year: 2012

In the current research work we have evaluated the antibacterial potential of essential oil of Blumea eriantha. The antimicrobial activity is studied against skin pathogens, mainly acne causing bacteria. The essential oil was extracted by hydrodistillation using Clevenger type apparatus. The oil showed significant antimicrobial activity against Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. The antimicrobial activity was assessed by means of broth microdilution method and time kill analysis. The determined values of minimum inhibitory concentration and time kill analysis studies of the essential oil indicate that Streptococcus pyogenes is the most sensitive bacterium. The oil also showed significant activity against Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus aureus. The obtained data highlight the potential of Blumea eriantha essential oil as a natural antibiotic in the treatment of skin infections.


Mammen D.,M. S. University of Baroda | Daniel M.,M. S. University of Baroda | Sane R.T.,Guru Nanak Institute for Research and Development
Pharmacognosy Journal | Year: 2011

Leptadenia reticulata (Retz.) W&A. or Jivanti, an important rasayana drug of India, is often confused with another twiner Ichnocarpus frutescens R. Br., to which it shares a number of morphological characters and thus the latter plant is often used to adulterate the former drug. Micromorphological, pharmacognostic, phytochemical and HPTLC fingerprint variations were identified to locate biomarkers distinguishing these two plants which would help in the correct identification of the plant, as well as to detect adulteration. The study of stomata in fresh plants showed stomata to be anisocytic in Leptadenia reticulata and paracytic in Ichnocarpus frutescens. Microscopic studies of the powders of both plants showed cuboidal calcium oxalate crystals, sclereids and starch grains in the former plant which were absent from the latter. Trichomes were multicellular and uniseriate in L. reticulata, but unicellular in I.frutesens. Leptadenia contained five flavones and a single glycoflavone whereas two flavonols were located in Ichnocarpus. Phenolic acid content also varied in both plants. Only I.frutescens contained propelargonidin. The HPTLC fingerprints of both the plants showed enough variation for identification of adulteration.


Barbade K.D.,Guru Nanak Institute for Research and Development | Datar A.G.,Guru Nanak Institute for Research and Development
International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences | Year: 2015

Objective: To investigate in-vitro antibacterial and free radical scavenging potentials of Mesua ferrea L. stamens which are used in traditional medicinal preparations along with their phytochemical investigation and in-vivo toxicity studies Methods: Various extracts of M. ferrea stamens were prepared by kinetic maceration method using four organic solvents. Potent antibacterial n-hexane extract of stamens was selected in the preliminary screening for antibacterial activity which was performed by an agar diffusion method for further studies. Quantification of antibacterial activity of n-hexane extract was carried out using broth microdilution method as per CLSI guidelines. Phytochemical investigations of the same extract were performed using qualitative tests for the detection of various phytochemical groups and Libermann-Burchard colorimetric assay for determination of total terpenoid content. In-vivo safety of the extract was determined by acute oral toxicity studies in mice as per OECD guidelines test no. 420. Results: n-hexane extract of M. ferrea stamens was found most potent amongst other extracts studied for antibacterial activity; moreover it exhibited bactericidal activity against selected bacterial pathogens. The same extract exhibited good free radical scavenging activity in DPPH assay (IC 50 value = 66.3 ^ig/ml). Phytochemical investigation of extract revealed presence of sterols, terpenoids and volatile oil components and the total terpenoid content was estimated as 102.8 mg/ml of dried extract (in terms of lupeol equivalents). The extract was found safe in mice in acute oral toxicity studies. Conclusion: M. ferrea stamens exhibited broad spectrum antibacterial activity along with good free radical scavenging potential and in-vivo safety which encourage further studies in the area. © 2015, International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Science. All rights reserved.


Sane R.T.,Guru Nanak Institute for Research and Development
Indian Drugs | Year: 2010

Pods of Prosopis cineraria are rich source of dietary fibers and proteins. The pods were extracted successively and individually with solvents of increasing polarity. The extracts were evaluated for the presence of phytoconstituents using paper 2D chromatography and high performance thin layer chromatography. Further identification was done using LC-MS-MS. The extracts of the pods were also tested for their antibacterial activity against gram positive and gram negative organisms. Acute toxicity study of extracted pods on albino swiss mice was conducted. It was observed that no significant toxicity was caused upto a dose level of 1g/kg body weight. A pilot pharmacokinetic study on New Zealand strain albino rabbit was also performed and Tmax was observed at the second h using a phytomarker.


Denni M.,M. S. University of Baroda | Sandhya B.,Guru Nanak Institute for Research and Development | Ramesh S.,Guru Nanak Institute for Research and Development
International Journal of Pharma and Bio Sciences | Year: 2012

Fruits of Terminalia chebula Retz., or the chebulic myrobalan, hold an important place in Ayurveda, as an important constituent of Triphala. They are harvested at three different stages of maturity and are thus available in the market as three different varieties. The most mature fruit is referred to as Surwary harda and the intermediately mature fruit is referred to as Rangari harda. The least mature fruit is commonly referred to as Bal harda. In the present work the variation in constituents of these products is followed up. Harda is known for its tannin content, especially gallic and ellagic acid derivatives. Gallic acid was found only in the mature fruits, while ellagic acid was found in both young and intermediate fruits. Two methyl ether derivatives of quercetin i.e. 3'-Methoxy quercetin and 3', 4'-Dimethoxy quercetin, were identified in all the three fruits, whose contents were found to increase with maturity. Melilotic acid has been identified along with vanillic and p-coumaric acids. All the three phenolic acids were found present only in intermediate and mature fruits. Pro-pelargonidin has been isolated from the mature fruit, using paper chromatography and identified using spectral analysis. Quinones were found to be absent in the young fruit.


Patil N.,Guru Nanak Institute for Research and Development | Datar A.,Guru Nanak Institute for Research and Development
International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences | Year: 2015

Objective: In the present study, a new, simple and an efficient microwave oven extraction method was developed for maximum yield of colorant from Ixora coccinea flowers. The preliminary stability study of colorant was carried out to provide reliable data for application of the plant. Methods: The comparison of cold extraction and microwave oven extraction method was carried out. The crude anthocyanin content was estimated by using pH differential method. The stability of color extract was evaluated for the period of one month by using UV- Visible spectroscopy. An attempt was made to separate color components of the extract by developing HPTLC method. Results: The yield of microwave oven extraction of colorant is found to be 13.26% under the optimized conditions set at the temperature of 70˚C, 50 minutes time, 0.1% HCl concentration in solvent and 1:60 ratio of sample to solvent. The result indicated that the anthocyanin content is 704.73 mg/100 g to 662.79 mg/100g in fresh material. The study demonstrated that the pinkish red extract of the flowers is stable under low pH values (≤4) and unstable under alkaline conditions. It is also found to be sensitive to high temperature and light. The HPTLC profile of color showed the presence of pink and violet color major components at Rf values 0.17, 0.33, 0.37, 0.56, 0.67 and 0.83. Conclusion: The experimental work on Ixora coccinea provides enough information to tap its potential as a colorant in acidic foods or cosmetics. © 2015, International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Science. All rights reserved.


Barbade K.D.,Guru Nanak Institute for Research and Development | Datar A.G.,Guru Nanak Institute for Research and Development
Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research | Year: 2015

Objective: Present extensive study on medicinal plant Embelia basaal (R. & S.) A. DC. was undertaken for evaluation and quantification of broad spectrum antibacterial activity, free radical scavenging potential, phytochemical investigation, development of high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) fingerprint profile and in-vivo safety of the plant. Methods: Dried fruits of the plant were powdered and macerated in variety of solvents to obtain four extracts of different polarities. Antibacterial activity was evaluated using agar well diffusion assay. Most potent antibacterial extract of E. basaal was selected for further extensive studies. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of the potent antibacterial extract were determined using broth macrodilution method as per Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Free radical scavenging activity was evaluated using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay. Qualitative phytochemical tests, quantification of total phenolic contents and HPTLC fingerprint analysis were carried out for phytochemical investigation. The in-vivo safety of the plant was determined by conducting acute oral toxicity studies in mice as per Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development guidelines test no. 420. Results: Ethanol extract of E. basaal was found potent bactericidal against selected pathogens and chosen for further extensive studies. The extract exhibited significant free radical scavenging activity (inhibitory concentration 50 value=50 µg/mL). Phytochemical investigation revealed presence of phenolic compounds, terpenoids, tannins and alkaloids in the test extract and it was found safe in-vivo at a dose level of 2000 mg/kg body weight of an animal. Conclusion: E. basaal was found medicinally active in the present study. Its broad spectrum antibacterial activity, significant free radical scavenging potential and in-vivo safety will provide a platform for advance studies in the area. © 2015, Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research. All rights reserved.


Patil N.N.,Guru Nanak Institute for Research and Development | Datar A.G.,Guru Nanak Institute for Research and Development
Coloration Technology | Year: 2016

In the present study an attempt has been made to propose the application of natural dye from Ixora coccinea L., commonly known as Jungle geranium, in the field of textiles and cosmetics. Dyeing with I. coccinea colourant with different combinations of mordants resulted in different shades, such as pink, lilac, and grey shades. The dyed samples were tested according to ISO standard test methods. The samples dyed with combinations of stannous chloride/ferrous sulphate and stannous chloride/ammonium ferrous sulphate were found to have good wash, rubbing, and light fastness properties. Moreover, an effort was made to formulate lip balm. The formulation was evaluated for its stability at 25 and 40 °C for 90 days. The colour of the product was assessed by measuring the L*a*b* values. The product offers excellent properties of smoothness, spreadability, and stability at 25 °C. © 2016 Society of Dyers and Colourists.

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