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Kim S.M.,Korea University | Kim S.M.,Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center | Cho G.J.,Guro Gu Public Health Center | Yannakoulia M.,Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center | And 6 more authors.
Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental | Year: 2011

The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of a 10-month lifestyle intervention on the components of the metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) in Koreans with MetSyn as well as on blood concentrations of adiponectin and vaspin. One hundred thirty-eight patients with MetSyn, recruited from a community health care center, were consecutively enrolled in the study; 12 patients dropped of the intervention, leaving 126 subjects (76 men and 50 women; age, 65.3 ± 9.0 years). All participants followed a 10-month lifestyle modification interventional program, including dietary counseling, advice on increasing physical activity, and recommendations to stop or limit smoking and alcohol drinking. Anthropometric and biochemical parameters related to the components of the MetSyn, including blood concentrations of adiponectin and vaspin, were assessed pre- and postintervention. At baseline, adiponectin concentrations were moderately negatively correlated to insulin concentrations and insulin resistance evaluated by the homeostasis model assessment. In response to lifestyle modification, statistically significant changes were found in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, triglyceride, and insulin concentrations, as well as in homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. Adiponectin concentrations postintervention, compared with the preintervention levels, increased (7.2 ± 4.0 vs 6.8 ± 3.9 μg/mL, respectively; P <.05), whereas vaspin concentrations remained unchanged (0.25 ± 0.19 vs 0.26 ± 0.20 ng/mL, respectively; P =.64). A 10-month lifestyle modification program in Korean patients with MetSyn led to favorable changes in metabolic parameters and adiponectin but not vaspin concentrations. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Source


Lee S.H.,Korea University | Kim S.M.,Korea University | Park H.S.,University of Ulsan | Choi K.M.,Korea University | And 3 more authors.
Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases | Year: 2013

Background and Aim: Evidence of the relationship between serum vitamin D levels and cardiovascular risk factors in children is limited. We investigated the associations between serum vitamin D levels (25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]) and obesity and metabolic syndrome and its components in Korean children. Methods and Results: We recruited 1660, nine-year-old, Korean children (904 boys and 756 girls) who voluntarily participated in this study while being examined during school-based health examinations. We measured anthropometric variables (height and weight), metabolic parameters (blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, triglyceride, and HDL cholesterol levels) and serum vitamin D levels. We analyzed the data using multivariate logistic regression models. Mean 25(OH)D levels were lower in children defined as obese or abdominally obese (P < 0.001). When serum levels of 25(OH)D were divided into quartiles, BMI, waist circumference, and triglyceride levels were lower, and HDL cholesterol levels were higher, as vitamin D levels increased. Using children from the highest quartile of 25(OH)D levels as a referent, the adjusted ORs (95% CI) for obesity in those in the third, second, and lowest quartiles of 25(OH)D levels were 1.55 (1.01-2.40), 1.87 (1.22-2.85), and 2.59 (1.71-3.90), respectively (P for trend <0.001). For abdominal obesity the ORs (CI) were 2.08 (1.20-3.60), 2.32 (1.36-3.95), and 2.96 (1.75-5.00) (P for trend<0.001), and for metabolic syndrome they were 2.60 (1.08-6.30), 4.00 (1.73-9.26), and 4.25 (1.84-9.85), respectively (P for trend <0.05). Conclusions: We found low vitamin D levels in Korean children to be associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Insufficient serum vitamin D levels in children may be a risk factor of obesity and metabolic syndrome. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. Source


Choi K.M.,Korea University | Yannakoulia M.,Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center | Yannakoulia M.,Harokopio University | Park M.S.,Korea University | And 11 more authors.
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition | Year: 2011

Background: Adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (A-FABP), retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4), and adiponectin have been associated with insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome in adults. Objective: We evaluated the association of A-FABP, RBP4, and adiponectin with the metabolic syndrome in Korean boys. Design: In this prospective cohort study, 159 boys participated in a school-based health examination and were followed up after 3 y. The metabolic syndrome in children was defined by using the pediatric adaptation of the National Cholesterol Education Program criteria. Results: Compared with normal-weight participants, overweight children had significantly higher A-FABP (23.6 ± 8.2 compared with 12.8 ± 5.1 μg/L, P < 0.001) and RBP4 (69.3 ± 17.1 compared with 59.7 ± 15.3 μg/mL, P = 0.001) concentrations and significantly lower adiponectin concentrations (11.5 ± 5.4 compared with 18.1 ± 8.4 μg/mL, P < 0.001). Baseline A-FABP concentrations were significantly higher in children who developed the metabolic syndrome than in those who did not, whereas adiponectin concentrations were significantly lower. Baseline RBP4 concentrations were not significantly different between the 2 groups. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that only A-FABP was an independent predictor of the development of the metabolic syndrome after adjustment for Tanner stage, insulin resistance, body mass index, sleep duration, and physical activity (odds ratio: 17.3; 95% CI: 1.25, 239.76; highest compared with lowest tertile), whereas the significant association between adiponectin and the metabolic syndrome observed by using bivariate analysis reflects, in part, an underlying association with obesity. Conclusion: A-FABP predicts the development of the metabolic syndrome independently of pubertal status, adiposity, and insulin resistance in Korean boys. © 2011 American Society for Nutrition. Source


Ko B.-J.,Korea University | Lee M.,Sungshin Womens University | Park H.S.,University of Ulsan | Han K.,Catholic University of Korea | And 7 more authors.
Endocrine Journal | Year: 2013

Adipokines are associated with obesity. However, the relationships between adipokines, specifically vaspin, obesity, and obesity-related variables remain controversial, and only a few studies have been conducted which examines them in children. We investigated the relationships between obesity in prepubertal Korean children and three types of adipokines: vaspin, leptin, and visfatin. In this cross-sectional study, 168 nine-year-old boys and 176 nine-year-old girls participated in a school-based health examination program. Children were classified as overweight using the Korean Pediatric Society 2007 guidelines. Overweight boys and girls had higher leptin and vaspin levels than both boys and girls of normal weight, whereas only overweight boys had higher visfatin levels than normal weight boys. Leptin, visfatin and vaspin concentrations were correlated with obesity-related variables. A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that systolic blood pressure (SBP), total cholesterol (TC), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), leptin, and vaspin were associated with an increased risk of being overweight, whereas high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol was associated with a decreased risk of being overweight. Elevated vaspin and leptin levels are associated with obesity in prepubertal Korean children. © The Japan Endocrine Society. Source


Choi H.Y.,Korea University | Park J.W.,AdipoGen Inc. | Lee N.,AdipoGen Inc. | Hwang S.Y.,Korea University | And 9 more authors.
Diabetes Care | Year: 2013

Objective-To examine the effect of a combined exercise program on C1q/tumor necrosis factor-related protein (CTRP) 3 and CTRP-5 levels and novel adiponectin paralogs suggested to be links between metabolism and inflammation and to evaluate sex differences and association with cardiometabolic risk factors in humans with use of a newly developed ELISA. RESEARCH DESIGN ANDMETHODSdThis cross-sectional study explored the implications of CTRP-3 and CTRP-5 on cardiometabolic parameters in 453 nondiabetic Korean adults. In addition, we evaluated the impact of a 3-month combined exercise program on CTRP-3 and CTRP-5 levels in 76 obese women. The exercise program consisted of 45 min of aerobic exercise at an intensity of 60-75% of the age-predicted maximum heart rate (300 kcal/session) and 20 min of resistance training (100 kcal/session) five times per week. Results-Both CTRP-3 and CTRP-5 concentrations were significantly higher in women (P , 0.001) than in men (P = 0.030). In a multiple stepwise regression analysis, CTRP-3 levels were independently associated with age, sex, and triglyceride, LDL cholesterol, adiponectin, and retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) levels (R2 = 0.182). After 3 months of a combined exercise program, cardiometabolic risk factors, including components of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and RBP4 levels, decreased significantly. In particular, CTRP-3 levels decreased significantly (median [interquartile range] 444.3 [373.8-535.0] to 374.4 [297.2-435.9], P < 0.001), whereas CTRP-5 levels were slightly increased (34.1 [28.6-44.3] to 38.4 [29.8-55.1], P = 0.048). Conclusions-A 3-month combined exercise program significantly decreased CTRP-3 levels and modestly increased CTRP-5 levels in obese Korean women. © 2013 by the American Diabetes Association. Source

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