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DUBLIN, OH, United States

Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2014

The long term goal of the project is to use malaria parasite specific low-molecular-weight metabolites as biomarkers for development of sensitive, low-cost, simple, battery-operated field-deployable urine or saliva diagnostic biosensor for detection of malaria infection. Four malaria parasite-specific metabolites (3-Methylindole, Succinylacetone, S-Methyl-L-thiocitrulline, O-Arachidonoyl Glycidol) recently identified by our metabolome analysis can potentially be used in the development of inexpensive and simple biosensor platforms for malaria diagnosis. This contract seeks to support CDC/MB studies by 1) generating biopolymer receptors against four malaria parasite-specific metabolites (3-Methylindole, Succinylacetone, S-Methyl-L-thiocitrulline, O-Arachidonoyl Glycidol) and 2) providing proof of concept in the use of inexpensive and simple biosensor platforms for detection of the target compounds. The detection of the above four malaria parasite-specific metabolites requires generation of biopolymer receptors, aptamers or antibodies, specific for the assay of these compounds. Once the receptors against the four compounds are ready, they should be respectively applied to various simple and inexpensive biosensors for detection of these compounds.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.89K | Year: 2014

Current methods of species-specific bacterial detection and identification are complex, time-consuming, and often require expensive specialized equipment and highly trained personnel. There is a growing need for developing fieldable devices to combat both naturally occurring, and deliberate outbreaks of biothreat agents. Building upon Guild BioSciences previous research on phage-mediated pathogen detection and lateral flow paper-microfluidic devices (uPADs), we propose to develop a fieldable pathogen diagnostic tool that synergistically combines the advantages of bacteriophages, fluorescent quantum dots (QDS) with the simplicity and portability of uPADs. The proposed device will have the capability to rapidly detect and identify multiple biodefense relevant pathogens in a field setting. Specifically, in the phase I project, we will: 1) generate affinity-tagged bacteriophages, 2) design and fabricate uPADs, 3) demonstrate the multiplexed and sensitive detection of B. anthracis and Y. pestis by phage-amplification assay via incorporating QDs as signal readout, 4) determine the assay sensitivity and limit-of-detection (LoD) in simulated clinical samples, and 5) validate the uPADs detection with in-house developed bioluminescent-phage-based pathogen detection. Phase II will optimize the assay process and reagents, generate the preclinical data required for FDA-approval, design a prototype fieldable kit, and expand the technology to enable the detection of additional bacterial pathogens.


The present invention is directed to an improved process for removing siloxanes from a biogas feed comprising (i) passing a gas feed through an adsorbent bed having an adsorbent having an inert surface to adsorb onto the adsorbent at least a portion of the siloxanes in the gas feed; and (ii) regenerating the adsorbent by removing siloxanes from the adsorbent. The adsorbent surface is rendered inert or nearly inert preferably via calcination.


Patent
Guild Associates | Date: 2015-03-25

The present disclosure relates to compositions, methods, systems and kits for the detection of microorganisms of the


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 223.74K | Year: 2015

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