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Patent
Guided Interventions | Date: 2016-09-21

A guide wire has a distal end incorporating a coil and a capacitive element that form a resonance circuit with a resonance frequency that is responsive to the pressure of blood external to the guide wire. The resonance frequency can be detected wirelessly, or through two contacts at the proximal wire end, or through one brush contact located inside an insertion sheath and a ground electrode. Wireless detection can be implemented via a second resonance circuit, and electronics for determining the frequency when the first and second circuits are in resonance with each other.


Chapman S.,U.S. National Cancer Institute | Dobrovolskaia M.,SAIC | Farahani K.,Guided Interventions | Goodwin A.,University of Colorado at Boulder | And 12 more authors.
Nano Today | Year: 2013

Recent advances in molecular imaging and nanotechnology are providing new opportunities for biomedical imaging with great promise for the development of novel imaging agents. The unique optical, magnetic, and chemical properties of materials at the scale of nanometers allow the creation of imaging probes with better contrast enhancement, increased sensitivity, controlled biodistribution, better spatial and temporal information, multi-functionality and multi-modal imaging across MRI, PET, SPECT, and ultrasound. These features could ultimately translate to clinical advantages such as earlier detection, real time assessment of disease progression and personalized medicine. However, several years of investigation into the application of these materials to cancer research has revealed challenges that have delayed the successful application of these agents to the field of biomedical imaging. Understanding these challenges is critical to take full advantage of the benefits offered by nano-sized imaging agents. Therefore, this article presents the lessons learned and challenges encountered by a group of leading researchers in this field, and suggests ways forward to develop nanoparticle probes for cancer imaging. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Duncan C.,University of Pennsylvania | Duncan C.,Guided Interventions | Trerotola S.O.,University of Pennsylvania
Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology | Year: 2016

Central venous port catheters that are too long are typically removed or revised. The subcutaneous position of port reservoirs precludes standard over-the-wire exchange techniques, and a method of percutaneous revision using an intravascular loop snare technique has been previously described. A retrospective review was conducted of 38 procedures that were performed at a single academic institution between 2005 and 2015. Technical success was 100%, without immediate or delayed complications with follow-up until port removal or death in 94% of patients. Percutaneous revision is an effective method for shortening too-long port catheters, allowing uninterrupted use of the port. © 2016 SIR.


Penet M.-F.,Johns Hopkins University | Artemov D.,Johns Hopkins University | Farahani K.,Guided Interventions | Bhujwalla Z.M.,Johns Hopkins University
NMR in Biomedicine | Year: 2013

Probe development is a critical component in cancer imaging, and novel probes are making major inroads in several aspects of cancer detection and image-guided treatments. Intrinsic MR probes such as signals from metabolites and their chemical shifts have been used for more than a decade to understand cancer physiology and metabolism. Through the integration of technology, molecular biology, and chemistry, the last few years have witnessed an explosion of extrinsic probes for molecular and functional imaging of cancer that, together with techniques such as CEST and hyperpolarization, have significantly expanded the repertoire of MR techniques in basic and translational investigations of many different aspects of cancer. Furthermore, incorporation of MR probes into multifunctional nanoparticles and multimodality imaging platforms have opened new opportunities for MR in image-guided diagnosis and therapy of cancer. Here we have provided an overview of recent innovations that have occurred in the development of MRI probes for molecular and functional imaging of cancer. Although most of these novel probes are not clinically available, they offer significant promise for future translational applications. In this review, we have highlighted the areas of future development that are likely to have a profound impact on cancer detection and treatment. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Probe development is a critical component in cancer imaging, and novel probes are making major inroads in several aspects of cancer detection and image-guided treatments. In this review, we have provided an overview of recent innovations that have occurred in the development of MRI probes for molecular and functional imaging of cancer. Although most of these novel probes are not clinically available, they offer significant promise for future translational applications. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd..


Patent
Guided Interventions | Date: 2014-03-11

A system for detection of blood pressure in a blood vessel includes a guide wire and a LC resonance circuit provided at a distal end of the guide wire. The resonance circuit may be a non-LC resonance circuit responsive to changes in pressure of fluid external to the guide wire such that the resonance circuit has a resonance frequency that varies in accordance with changes in pressure of the external fluid.


A system having a catheter having a distal pressure sensitive capacitive element providing an impedance and phase shift which varies responsive to the amount of pressure from blood external the catheter, a detector having electronics for determining the impedance and/or phase shift. This impedance and or phase shift corresponds to the pressure of the blood about the distal end of the catheter. When the catheter is inserted into a patients body, the impedance or phase shift is detected quasi wirelessly without special signal communication means like optical fibers or electrical wires from outside the patients body utilizing the patient as a ground path and the catheter shaft as an electrical conductor.


Apparatus and methods for deactivating bronchial nerves and smooth muscle extending along a bronchial branch of a mammalian subject to treat asthma and related conditions. An electromechanical transducer (11) is inserted into the bronchus as, for example, by advancing the distal end of a catheter (10) bearing the transducer into the bronchial section to be treated. The electromechanical transducer emits unfocused mechanical vibratory energy of one or more ultrasonic frequencies so as to heat tissues throughout a relatively large target region (13) as, for example, at least about 1 cm^(3 )encompassing the bronchus to a temperature sufficient to inactivate nerves but insufficient to cause rapid ablation or necrosis of organic tissues. The treatment can be performed without locating or focusing on individual bronchial nerves.


A guide wire has a distal end incorporating a coil and a capacitive element that form a resonance circuit with a resonance frequency that is responsive to the pressure of blood external to the guide wire. The resonance frequency can be detected wirelessly, or through two contacts at the proximal wire end, or through one brush contact located inside an insertion sheath and a ground electrode. Wireless detection can be implemented via a second resonance circuit, and electronics for determining the frequency when the first and second circuits are in resonance with each other.


Intra-organ ultrasound images are obtained by integrating ultrasound array configurations at the distal region of a sheath or guiding catheter integral to any catheter based intervention. A dual mode ablation/imaging circular ultrasound array is used to create circular or partial circular lesions. The sites of the individual lesion segments are identified in an ultrasound 2D image. In the case of PV isolation the process of ablating individual segments identified in the ultrasound image is repeated until a circumferential, continuous lesion has been achieved and PV isolation has been confirmed with the coaxial loop sensing catheter which also serves as a guide wire.


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